Dentist’s Therapy Dog Is So Proud When He Does A Good Job

At a Zanesville, Ohio, dental practice, one member of the staff makes people actually look forward to their appointments. 

A few days a week, a 1-year-old Labradoodle named Dwight goes to work with his mom, a dental hygenist, at Sulens Dental Studio. The mild-tempered pup greets anxious patients and helps take their mind off their fears. 

Dwight the therapy dog comforts a patient
Jensen McVey

Dwight began his training as a therapy dog at 12 weeks old and continues to practice with trainers twice a week at his puppy school and the dental office. But from the moment his mom brought him home, she knew he’d be perfect for the job.

“Dwight was definitely born to be a therapy dog,” Jensen McVey, Dwight’s trainer, told The Dodo. “He is extremely sweet and has never met a stranger!”

Therapy dog helps out at dentist's office
Jensen McVey

“Dwight can definitely get excited and play when the time calls for it but otherwise he is a calm cuddle bug,” he added. “Dwight is so much fun to work with and every one of my employees loves working with him and loves seeing him come in.”

Jensen McVey

According to one study, as many as 36 percent of people suffer from dental fear. But Dwight is doing everything he can to help change people’s perception of sitting in the dentist’s chair. Therapy dogs can positively change people’s mood and anxiety — even reducing their perception of pain.

Dwight’s job starts as soon as the patient walks in. He runs to greet them at the door with a big smile and a wagging tail. If the patient needs a little extra help, Dwight is happy to comfort them during their cleaning or procedure.

Jensen McVey

“He helps to create a fun experience for scared children coming in and provides overall comfort for those in the office,” McVey said. “He is also trained to gently lay and apply pressure for nervous patients or to gently place his paws up so people can pet him and take their mind off of being at the dentist.”

Jensen McVey

For all his hard work, Dwight gets paid in treats and a monthly BarkBox. But the pup is happiest when he can spend time with his dental family — helping people feel a little bit better every day.

Source Article

Read more

‘Dentist Dog’ Is So Proud When He Does A Good Job



a dog wearing a costume



At a Zanesville, Ohio, dental practice, one member of the staff makes people actually look forward to their appointments. 

A few days a week, a 1-year-old Labradoodle named Dwight goes to work with his mom, a dental hygenist, at Sulens Dental Studio. The mild-tempered pup greets anxious patients and helps take their mind off their fears. 


a dog holding a stuffed animal


© Jensen McVey



Dwight began his training as a therapy dog at 12 weeks old and continues to practice with trainers twice a week at his puppy school and the dental office. But from the moment his mom brought him home, she knew he’d be perfect for the job.

“Dwight was definitely born to be a therapy dog,” Jensen McVey, Dwight’s trainer, told The Dodo. “He is extremely sweet and has never met a stranger!”




© Jensen McVey



“Dwight can definitely get excited and play when the time calls for it but otherwise he is a calm cuddle bug,” he added. “Dwight is so much fun to work with and every one of my employees loves working with him and loves seeing him come in.”


a person holding a dog


© Jensen McVey



According to one study, as many as 36 percent of people suffer from dental fear. But Dwight is doing everything he can to help change people’s perception of sitting in the dentist’s chair. Therapy dogs can positively change people’s mood and anxiety — even reducing their perception of pain.

Dwight’s job starts as soon as the patient walks in. He runs to greet them at the door with a big smile and a wagging tail. If the patient needs a little extra help, Dwight is happy to comfort them during their cleaning or procedure.


a person holding a dog


© Jensen McVey



“He helps to create a fun experience for scared children coming in and provides overall comfort for those in the office,” McVey said. “He is also trained to gently lay and apply pressure for nervous patients or to gently place his paws up so people can pet him and take their mind off of being at the dentist.”


a dog sitting on a table


© Jensen McVey



For all his hard work, Dwight gets paid in treats and a monthly BarkBox. But the pup is happiest when he can spend time with his dental family — helping people feel a little bit better every day.

Continue Reading

Source Article

Read more

Covid leaves some with medical bills, job insecurity, lingering isssues

Welcome to the Covid Economy, CNBC Make It’s deep dive into how the coronavirus pandemic is impacting all areas of our lives, from food to housing, health care to small business. We’re focusing on North Carolina, a swing state that has seen rapid economic growth — and growing inequality — since the last recession to learn how residents are weathering the economic consequences of this once-in-a-lifetime health crisis.

Ann only let her guard down for an afternoon. After months of being careful and following social distancing guidelines, she got together with a friend over the Fourth of July weekend. The next day, that friend let her know they were feeling sick. Four days after that, Ann began developing symptoms, too. 

An HR manager based in the Charlotte, North Carolina, area, Ann, who agreed to speak to CNBC Make It on the condition that she be identified only by her middle name to protect her privacy, scheduled a Covid-19 test on July 15. She received a positive result two days later. 

It’s been more than four months, and Ann’s still struggling to fully recover from the virus. But it’s not just her health that’s been impacted. She’s had to take an unpaid leave of absence from work, and despite having health insurance, she’s worried about the mounting medical bills.

During the nearly three weeks that Ann suffered from the worst effects of Covid-19, she was mainly isolated at home. “There was an entire week that I had to lie on my stomach for hours just to breathe without a crushing pain in my chest,” Ann says. “The vomiting and diarrhea were so unyielding that one day I contemplated just sitting in the tub instead of going back and forth to the toilet.”

At one point, Ann’s symptoms were so serious, she did go to the emergency room. Fortunately, her hospital stay was short, and she never had to be put on a ventilator. But even after the worst of her symptoms passed, her life has yet to return to normal. One of the rising number of so-called “long haulers,” Ann is still feeling the ongoing effects of the virus. 

“It’s just so weird to me to be someone who is healthy and in their thirties to have something just completely ravage you so hard that it affects every organ in your body,” Ann says. 

Costs of Covid-19 vary dramatically and can go beyond just medical bills

Read more

A spin class became a superspreader event. Why are fitness instructors excluded from workers’ compensation if they fall ill on the job?

Back injuries, knee pain, shoulder problems — and now, COVID-19.

They are daily risks faced by fitness instructors and personal trainers across the province. But unlike millions of employees in other sectors, gym staff are not entitled to workers’ compensation when they get sick or hurt on the job.

It’s a long-standing exclusion to the workers’ compensation system that critics say needs urgent change, especially in light of a Hamilton spin studio outbreak that may have exposed upwards of 2,500 people to COVID. Two staff members at the studio contracted the virus.

“Our bodies are on the line,” said Toronto-based group fitness instructor Vidya Sri. “The laws are completely out of date.”

Under current provincial legislation, gyms and fitness studios are exempt from mandatory workers’ compensation coverage. That means they do not need to pay insurance premiums to the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board — and their employees cannot access benefits following a workplace accident or illness.

Gyms can voluntarily opt into the workers’ compensation system. There are 1,653 fitness establishments in Ontario, according to Statistics Canada; of those, 24 have elected to provide compensation coverage to workers, data from the WSIB shows.

Coverage means workers are eligible for loss-of-earning or health-care benefits following a work-related illness or injury.

A 2019 report on working conditions in the Ontario fitness sector by Larry Savage, a professor of labour studies at Brock University, found nearly a third all instructors and trainers had sustained an injury on the job. Half reported not having paid sick days.

“The lack of WSIB coverage and paid sick days make gym and fitness club workers less willing to disclose illness or injuries out of fear of reprisal or loss of income,” Savage said.

“The pandemic only makes this bad situation worse by increasing the likelihood that clients and other workers will contract COVID-19 if gym and fitness club workers decide to come in to work sick in order to avoid loss of pay.”

As part of his research, Savage told the Star he made inquiries with the Ministry of Labour about the history of the gym exclusion but “no one could or was willing to explain” why it existed.

Around 76 per cent of Ontario workplaces are required to pay into workers’ compensation. Legislative change is needed to amend the list of excluded employers. When asked if the government is considering reform, a spokesperson for the Ministry of Labour said workers’ health and safety was its “top priority.”

“With only a handful of exceptions, those workplaces that aren’t subject to mandatory coverage can choose to purchase coverage from the WSIB,” the statement said.

Planet Fitness outlets account for 10 of the gyms that voluntarily signed up for coverage, according to the WSIB’s data. Other than F45 Guelph, part of a relatively new but popular fitness chain, none of the gyms that opted into the workers’ compensation system are major players. (Other establishments included the “Orillia Agricultural Society” and “Retro Rollers.”)

In response to questions from the Star,

Read more