Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine Partners With MANRRS to Increase Diversity in Veterinary Profession

Pet owners represent a much more diverse population than the veterinary professionals who care for them and their animals, a gap the American Veterinary Medicine Association (AVMA)1 and the Association of American Veterinary Colleges (AAVMC) 2 are working hard to fill. Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine (RUSVM) is committed to being part of the solution and is proud to announce a new partnership with Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources and Related Sciences (MANRRS). This collaboration will further RUSVM’s long-term commitment to increase diversity in the veterinary profession and strengthen the pipeline of highly qualified, diverse students pursuing an education in veterinary medicine.

The partnership will introduce RUSVM to MANRRS chapters across the U.S. with MANRRS members gaining access to exclusive webinars and virtual workshops from RUSVM to increase exposure to the profession. Additionally, qualified students may apply for a newly launched MANRRS scholarship. The partnership will also help establish a professional chapter of MANRRS at RUSVM that will create mentoring opportunities for current RUSVM students and enhanced networking opportunities. To learn more about this partnership, click here.

“It is vitally important that the field of veterinary medicine is representative of the communities that we serve, and Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine is thrilled to take this important step toward increasing diversity in the field,” said Sean Callanan, MVB, CERTVR, MRCVS, PHD, FRCPATH, DIPLECVP, dean of Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine. “As one of the most ethnically diverse AVMA-accredited veterinary schools, the partnership with MANRRS will provide new opportunities for prospective, current and former students, and pave the way for a more diverse workforce.”

According to an American Veterinary Medicine Association (AVMA) report, more than one-third of African Americans surveyed own a pet. However, the vast majority of practicing veterinarians in the U.S. are white3, highlighting a disparity in the diversity of the profession and the people that they serve.

“While facing the dismal reality that more than 85% of Veterinarians are white, MANRRS is committed to partnering with RUSVM to provide underrepresented students access to pursue a career in veterinary medicine,” said Ebony Webber, chief operating officer for MANRRS. “Provided that MANRRS is one of the only and largest organizations focused on diverse talent in agriculture, our student and professional members expect MANRRS to advocate for diversity, equity, and inclusion in areas where minorities are needed to help solve the world’s biggest challenges relating to animal health.”

RUSVM, supported by its parent company, Adtalem Global Education, is committed to cultivating a culture of diversity and inclusivity and creating a diverse global workforce that reflects that culture. To learn more about Adtalem’s commitment to diversity and inclusion, click here.

About Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine

Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine (RUSVM) is an institution of Adtalem Global Education (NYSE:ATGE, member S&amp, P MidCap 400 Index)). Founded in 1982, RUSVM is committed to preparing students to become members and leaders of the worldwide public and professional healthcare team and to advance human, animal and

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Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine Partners With MANRRS to Increase Diversity in Veterinary Profession – Press Release

BASSETERRE, St. Kitts–(Business Wire)–Pet owners represent a much more diverse population than the veterinary professionals who care for them and their animals, a gap the American Veterinary Medicine Association (AVMA)1 and the Association of American Veterinary Colleges (AAVMC) 2 are working hard to fill. Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine (RUSVM) is committed to being part of the solution and is proud to announce a new partnership with Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources and Related Sciences (MANRRS). This collaboration will further RUSVM’s long-term commitment to increase diversity in the veterinary profession and strengthen the pipeline of highly qualified, diverse students pursuing an education in veterinary medicine.

The partnership will introduce RUSVM to MANRRS chapters across the U.S. with MANRRS members gaining access to exclusive webinars and virtual workshops from RUSVM to increase exposure to the profession. Additionally, qualified students may apply for a newly launched MANRRS scholarship. The partnership will also help establish a professional chapter of MANRRS at RUSVM that will create mentoring opportunities for current RUSVM students and enhanced networking opportunities. To learn more about this partnership, click here.

“It is vitally important that the field of veterinary medicine is representative of the communities that we serve, and Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine is thrilled to take this important step toward increasing diversity in the field,” said Sean Callanan, MVB, CERTVR, MRCVS, PHD, FRCPATH, DIPLECVP, dean of Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine. “As one of the most ethnically diverse AVMA-accredited veterinary schools, the partnership with MANRRS will provide new opportunities for prospective, current and former students, and pave the way for a more diverse workforce.”

According to an American Veterinary Medicine Association (AVMA) report, more than one-third of African Americans surveyed own a pet. However, the vast majority of practicing veterinarians in the U.S. are white3, highlighting a disparity in the diversity of the profession and the people that they serve.

“While facing the dismal reality that more than 85% of Veterinarians are white, MANRRS is committed to partnering with RUSVM to provide underrepresented students access to pursue a career in veterinary medicine,” said Ebony Webber, chief operating officer for MANRRS. “Provided that MANRRS is one of the only and largest organizations focused on diverse talent in agriculture, our student and professional members expect MANRRS to advocate for diversity, equity, and inclusion in areas where minorities are needed to help solve the world’s biggest challenges relating to animal health.”

RUSVM, supported by its parent company, Adtalem Global Education, is committed to cultivating a culture of diversity and inclusivity and creating a diverse global workforce that reflects that culture. To learn more about Adtalem’s commitment to diversity and inclusion, click here.

About Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine

Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine (RUSVM) is an institution of Adtalem Global Education (NYSE: ATGE; member S&P MidCap 400 Index). Founded in 1982, RUSVM is committed to preparing students to become members and leaders of the worldwide public and professional healthcare team and to advance

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Coronavirus US: More than 40 states are reporting an increase in Covid-19 cases and many in the Midwest are seeing record hospitalizations

The seven-day average is part of a fall surge that has brought the national case count to more than 8.8 million, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. Four of the five highest number of cases in a single day were recorded in the last seven days, with the top two reported on Friday and Saturday. And 41 states are reporting at least 10% more cases compared to the week before.

When it comes to the climbing metric, the US is “not in a good place,” director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Dr. Anthony Fauci said during a virtual Q&A on Wednesday. Health experts have pushed measures against the virus to bring the baseline of infections down before colder months drove them back up. But rising records of cases and hospitalizations are making up “a bad recipe for a tough time ahead,” Fauci said.

In the Midwest, residents are being impacted by the rising cases with spiking rates of hospitalizations.

Indiana and Wisconsin reported their peak levels of coronavirus hospitalizations. And Kansas saw the most ICU hospitalizations of the virus in one day, the same day the state surpassed 1,000 deaths since the pandemic began.

“Each one of these Kansans was someone’s child, parent, or grandparent,” Gov. Laura Kelly said in a release. “They were part of a community.”

On Wednesday, 13 states reported more hospitalization records, according to the Covid Tracking Project.

Mask mandates lower hospitalizations, study says

Mask mandates may be a key strategy to lowering rates of hospitalization, according to the findings of a study from Vanderbilt School of Medicine.

In hospitals where more than 75% of the patients came from counties that required masks, rates of hospitalizations did not rise between July and October, while hospitals with fewer than 25% of patients from those counties saw an increase over 200%.

Fact check: Trump falsely claims California requires people to wear 'special' and 'complex' mask at all times

Other mitigation factors likely came into play, as areas with mask requirements are more likely to have residents who follow other mitigation strategies, the authors wrote.

“The good news is that we have learned a great deal since the beginning of the pandemic,” they said. “An important takeaway from this analysis is that areas with virus mitigation strategies … have seen lower growth in hospitalizations since the summer months; hospitals in these areas are in a much better position to serve the entire spectrum of community health needs, not just COVID-19 patients.”

As the weather continues to grow colder, Fauci said in an interview with CNBC Wednesday that he supports a national mask mandate.

“We’re going to have many more hospitalizations and that will inevitably lead to more deaths. So, this is an untenable situation. That’s the reason why I say we have got to do these things,” Fauci said.

While he is in support of a mask mandate, Fauci said he doesn’t think it will happen nationally “because it might not come from the White House to do it.”

States concerned over alarming hospitalization rates

Many state leaders are putting measures

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Hospitals across 38 states report increase in COVID-19 patients

The coronavirus is spreading faster than ever in the U.S., with the highest one-week average of new cases since the pandemic began. Thirty-eight states are reporting increases in the number of hospitalized patients compared to two weeks ago.

The situation is especially dire in seven states — Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Texas — where many intensive care units are near or at capacity. Average daily deaths have also edged back up to about 800 Americans per day, according to Johns Hopkins University. It’s a level not seen in more than a month.

In Utah, hospitals pushed to the brink are preparing to ration care. 

Dr. Todd Vento, the top infectious disease doctor at Intermountain Healthcare in Salt Lake City, told CBS News, “I would say that if you don’t think that your daily actions affect others that you’ve never met, you’re wrong. Everything we do that circulates the virus eventually makes it so that it might get to someone who ends up in the hospital.”

In the Midwest, the surge has been especially hard. Wisconsin saw 5,262 new cases, according to state health officials, which is its highest daily uptick in cases since the pandemic began. Illinois saw 4,000 new cases, and daily deaths have risen 58.3%, the state Department of Public Health reported.

“We have got to reverse the trend and slow the spread of this virus,” said Illinois Governor J.B. Pritzker.

COVID-19 cases in kids are also rising — up more than 14% in two weeks, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. And now, a British study suggests coronavirus antibodies might only last months — similar to those for the common cold.

The average number of new COVID-19 cases in New Jersey has jumped by more than 45% in the last two weeks. In the city of Newark, where the coronavirus positivity rate is topping more than 11%, new restrictions are in effect.

“It’s not panic. It’s calculated strategies to do what we know works here in Newark,” Dr. Mark Wade, director of the Newark Department of Health and Community Wellness, told CBS News.

Starting Tuesday night, all non-essential businesses and indoor dining in Newark will shut down at 8 p.m. until at least November 10.

Meanwhile, on the vaccine front, drugmaker Pfizer announced Tuesday that it plans to apply for emergency-use authorization from the Food and Drug Administration for its COVID-19 vaccine in November.

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VitalHub Continues to Increase NHS UK Presence with Additional Regional Licensing Deal of Synopsis Products

TORONTO, Oct. 28, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — VitalHub Corp. (the “Company” or “VitalHub”) (TSXV: VHI) is pleased to announce the licensing of newly-acquired subsidiary Intouch With Health’s (“Intouch”) digital, at-home pre-op solutions, Synopsis iQ, to Northumbria Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust (“Northumbria” or the “Trust”).

Northumbria Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust has licensed VitalHub subsidiary Intouch’s digital pre-operative solution platform, Synopsis iQ, as the Trust launches a new digital pre-operative assessment (POA) pathway that will improve demand and capacity planning and resource utilization, helping to fill last-minute surgery slots and reducing the number of face-to-face appointments the department processes.

The Synopsis solution will enable Northumbria to meet a number of Trust targets, such as reducing the face-to-face appointments, which has become a much-needed requirement in the pandemic climate. Synopsis will provide the Trust with tools to afford patients with an improved experience leading up to surgery, affecting both the delivery and quality of care provided.

The project is part of the Trust’s drive to create a more efficient operating room booking pathway by creating a pool of ‘pre-op ready’ patients’ consultants can use to create operating room lists and fill last-minute surgery slots. As part of the project, patients waiting for surgery will also be able to complete their POA health questionnaire at home via a secure link on the Trust’s website. Results are then sent to the Trust’s pre-operative assessment department where staff can triage and swim-lane patients into the correct fitness and readiness categories.

The Trust identified a considerable burden on pre-op assessment departments, facing high volumes of last-minute requests for patient appointments, resulting in operating time delays and resource inefficiencies. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Trust established a target to reduce the number of face-to-face appointments patients had to attend, creating a need for a pre-op pathway solution, and has selected Synopsis iQ and Synopsis Home as their solutions of choice to enable the progression of this target.

Digitizing the pre-operative assessment process will also allow consultants and anaesthetists to access full patient notes from any of the Trust’s four hospital sites. The project will be rolled out across North Tyneside General Hospital, Northumbria Specialist Emergency Care Hospital, Hexham General Hospital and Wansbeck General Hospital, giving staff across all four hospitals secure access to patient records and a real-time view of each patient’s status through the pre-operative pathway.

Northumbria Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust is a regional healthcare network that provides a range of health and care services to support more than 500,000 people living in Northumberland and North Tyneside. The Trust delivers care from 11 sites, including their emergency care hospital, general and community hospitals, outpatient and diagnostic centers, an elderly care unit and an integrated health and social care facility. The Trust admitted over 116,000 patients and handled over 368,000 outpatient appointments in the 2017/18 period.

“We are seeing an aggressive uptick in awareness and interest in the Synopsis suite of products,” said Dan Matlow, CEO of VitalHub Corp. “With this contract, we add another

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Hospitals across 38 states report increase in coronavirus patients

The coronavirus is spreading faster than ever in the U.S., with the highest one-week average of new cases since the pandemic began. Thirty-eight states are reporting increases in the number of hospitalized patients compared to two weeks ago.



a group of people in a room: Hospital


© CBS News
Hospital

The situation is especially dire in seven states — Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Texas — where many intensive care units are near or at capacity. Average daily deaths have also edged back up to about 800 Americans per day, according to Johns Hopkins University. It’s a level not seen in more than a month.

In Utah, hospitals pushed to the brink are preparing to ration care. 

Dr. Todd Vento, the top infectious disease doctor at Intermountain Healthcare in Salt Lake City, told CBS News, “I would say that if you don’t think that your daily actions affect others that you’ve never met, you’re wrong. Everything we do that circulates the virus eventually makes it so that it might get to someone who ends up in the hospital.”

Coronavirus patients flooding hospitals as infections spread in 43 states

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In the Midwest, the surge has been especially hard. Wisconsin saw 5,262 new cases, according to state health officials, which is its highest daily uptick in cases since the pandemic began. Illinois saw 4,000 new cases, and daily deaths have risen 58.3%, the state Department of Public Health reported.

“We have got to reverse the trend and slow the spread of this virus,” said Illinois Governor J.B. Pritzker.

COVID-19 cases in kids are also rising — up more than 14% in two weeks, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. And now, a British study suggests coronavirus antibodies might only last months — similar to those for the common cold.

The average number of new COVID-19 cases in New Jersey has jumped by more than 45% in the last two weeks. In the city of Newark, where the coronavirus positivity rate is topping more than 11%, new restrictions are in effect.

“It’s not panic. It’s calculated strategies to do what we know works here in Newark,” Dr. Mark Wade, director of the Newark Department of Health and Community Wellness, told CBS News.

Starting Tuesday night, all non-essential businesses and indoor dining in Newark will shut down at 8 p.m. until at least November 10.

Meanwhile, on the vaccine front, drugmaker Pfizer announced Tuesday that it plans to apply for emergency-use authorization from the Food and Drug Administration for its COVID-19 vaccine in November.

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Group sees 14% increase in child Covid-19 cases with close to 800,000 US kids infected

The group, which represents pediatricians, says about 792,188 children have been infected in the US as of October 22. According to Johns Hopkins University, more than 8.6 million Americans have been infected with the novel coronavirus.

The AAP said 94,555 new child cases were reported from October 8 to October 22.

Severe illness and deaths from Covid-19 are still rare among children. As of October 22, children represented between 1% and 3.6% of total hospitalizations, depending on the state. Between 0.6% and 6.9% of all child Covid-19 cases resulted in hospitalization and in states that reported the information, up to 0.15% of all children with Covid-19 died. Sixteen states reported no child deaths.

The AAP said it started collecting this data in the absence of regular releases of information from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The CDC provides a national number of cases by age in its data tracker, but the age data isn’t released on a regular schedule. The AAP reports on numbers of cases among children weekly.

With the CDC numbers it is also hard to know where the cases are coming from, as there are no geographic indicators provided with the CDC’s age data.

What you need to know about coronavirus on Monday, October 26

The AAP’s count is not totally complete, because not all states report data in the same way. The cases are likely undercounted, according to the organization. These numbers come from 49 states, New York City, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and Guam. A smaller subset of states report information about hospitalizations and deaths by age.

The AAP recommends that children wear masks, avoid large crowds and keep a healthy distance from others. It also suggests all children 6 months or older get a flu shot. Pediatricians say it’s even more important than ever to get a flu shot before the end of October.

With two respiratory diseases circulating at the same time –flu and coronavirus — will be confusing to doctors, parents and caregivers. Plus, hospitals and clinics could be overwhelmed with the double burden.

As another wave of the pandemic approaches, the nation's food banks are being hit on three fronts
The two viruses cause similar symptoms but a study published September in JAMA Network Open found that children hospitalized with Covid-19 were more likely to have fever, aches, diarrhea and vomiting than were children with the flu.
Children with Covid-19 also tended to be older and have at least one underlying health condition. Babies under a year old with certain underlying conditions such as asthma or diabetes may also be more likely to have severe illness from Covid-19.
Covid-19 and seasonal flu in children led to similar rates of hospitalization, intensive care admission, and need for a ventilator to help breathing, the study found. The CDC says 189 children died from flu over the 2019-2020 season.

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50,000 children in Louisiana are without health insurance, the largest increase in a decade | Health care/Hospitals

Roughly 11,000 children in Louisiana lost their health insurance last year, the largest single-year drop in over a decade and an alarming reversal of years of progress getting kids covered.

About 50,000 children, or 4.4% of children in Louisiana, were uninsured in the state in 2019, according to an analysis of U.S. Census data by the Louisiana Budget Project, compared to 39,000 children who lacked health insurance in 2018. In 2016, the number of uninsured children was even lower, at 36,000.

The data in Louisiana mirror a nationwide trend that experts fear will worsen amid job losses and an unstable economy due to the coronavirus.



What contributes to Louisiana's high maternal mortality rate? The distance to care, research says

22 of Louisiana’s 64 parishes have no hospital offering obstetric care, birth center, OB/GYN or certified nurse-midwives 

“This reflected 2019, which was a year in which we had record low unemployment and a decade of strong economic growth,” said Stacey Roussel, policy director for the Louisiana Budget Project and author of the report. “Still, we were seeing the uninsured rate for children rising across the country as well as here in Louisiana.”

“It also means a record increase in the number of families without insurance for their children as we were going into the largest public health emergency we’ve seen in our generation,” she added.

Access to health care is critical for young brains and bodies, according to researchers and medical experts.

In the first few years of life, over 80% of brain development takes place and the foundation is laid for growth of major body systems.

Interventions are most effective when doctors can spot conditions at a young age before they become a bigger issue.

“Preventative care is the hallmark of pediatric care,” said Dr. Ryan Pasternak, an adolescent medicine specialist and associate professor at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine. “Our goal is not only to identify and treat acute and chronic illnesses, but also to address and identify lifelong illnesses.”

Even short gaps in care can allow things to slip through. Pasternak said he saw a young patient this month who lost Medicaid and put off care for seven months. When the patient regained coverage, it was a two and a half hour visit.

“There were just a plethora of issues that had not been addressed,” Pasternak said.

Boy born 22 weeks into mother’s pregnancy

It’s not yet clear exactly why Louisiana’s number of uninsured children has grown so much in a year.

In 2016, Louisiana expanded Medicaid to include those making up to 138% of the federal poverty level, or about $36,000 for a family of four as of 2020. By April 2019, the expansion provided coverage to more than 500,000 additional people.

But in May of last year, Medicaid enrollment dipped after wage checks that automatically kicked off people appearing to make too much money to qualify, dropping by about 50,000 enrollees by the of 2019. But in January, enrollment started to climb again, with 550,000 people covered by the expansion as of Sept. 2020. 

Providers searching

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IU School of Medicine partnering to increase greater access to psychiatric care in Northwest Indiana | Local News



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Indiana University Northwest




MERRILLVILLE — A new partnership is seeking to bring greater access to psychiatric care in Northwest Indiana.

The IU School of Medicine in collaboration with the Northwest Indiana GME Consortium is launching a new psychiatry resident program at IU Northwest to train psychiatrists in a four-year program.

The program, accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, will accept four residents each year.


IUN to offer degree exploration, admissions advice in virtual open house

It is the first psychiatry residency program in northern Indiana and the third in the IU School of Medicine, IU School of Medicine Northwest — Gary campus director Elizabeth Ryan said in a news release.

“The program contributes to a goal of recruiting medical students to the Northwest-Gary campus, upon medical school graduation transitioning to a Northwest Indiana-located residency program and retaining these physicians to serve in the Region,” Ryan said.

The United States Health Resources and Services Administration has designated Northwest Indiana as a high-needs geographic health professional shortage area, according to an IU School of Medicine news release.


250% spike in NWI COVID cases, rising positivity rates indicate worst is yet to come, professor says

The program’s partners say they hope the new cohort can help ease this gap.

Residents in the new program will be integrated into the network of Northwest Indiana GME Consortium partners, like Regional Health Systems in Merrillville.

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Coronavirus case increase sets new U.S. record, rising to 77K in one day

The U.S. set a record Thursday as the number of new coronavirus cases rose to over 77,000, topping the previous record in July.

Nationwide, 77,640 new cases were reported for the day, up from the previous record of 75,723 on July 29, according to the latest tally compiled by NBC News.

The record-breaking daily tally comes as the total number of coronavirus cases in the country has reached nearly 8.5 million, with 224,280 deaths. There were 921 coronavirus-related deaths reported on Thursday.

Public health officials warned this week that the number of cases is rising across most of the country.

Dr. Jay Butler, deputy director for infectious diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said Wednesday afternoon that the agency has noted a “distressing trend” in which coronavirus case numbers are “increasing in nearly 75 percent of the country.”

Much of the increase is centered in the Midwest. States like Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska and Wisconsin have recorded rises in case numbers in the last two weeks.

Public health officials attribute the spikes, in part, to cooler weather that is forcing people indoors.

“Smaller, more intimate gatherings with family, friends and neighbors may be driving infections,” Butler said, while also acknowledging pandemic fatigue among the public.

“We get tired of wearing masks, but it continues to be as important as it’s ever been,” he said.

This is a developing story; check back for updates.

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