Black Friday fit gifts: Burn calories, get healthy with big deals on home gym gear, workout clothing, fitness trackers

Maybe you stuffed yourself at the Thanksgiving table or you’ve put on a few pounds during coronavirus stay-at-home orders. Don’t stress. Most people feel under motivated and overweight right now.

If you want to reduce your soon-to-be Santa belly, retailers are offering Black Friday discounts on top brand health and exercise equipment, athlete-endorsed workout clothing and motivational personal electronics, like Fitbits and other fitness trackers.

Have you seen fitness mirrors that can stream live workouts in any room of your home?

Here are highlights of Black Friday fitness gear:

Bowflex has strength and cardio equipment including a full lineup of indoor cycling bikes, Max Trainers, home gyms, treadmills and adjustable dumbbells. Use code FIT2020 for Black Friday specials, discounts and freebies at checkout through Dec. 2.

The Brrrn Experience offers an at-home fitness slide board that includes on-demand workouts. Use the code TURKEY15 to receive 15% off and a year’s on-demand subscription.

Echelonfit offers rowers, bikes, treadmills and smart mirrors to support at-home workouts as well as live and on-demand classes. Save $200 on the new EX-1 LE bike, on sale at $799 (regularly $999) that can be delivered by Christmas.

Hydrow has at-home rowing machines with live and on-demand, athlete-led workouts. Receive $500, $250 in accessories and free shipping with the Hydrow Black Friday Package ($1,995).

Hyfit Gear has smart fitness resistance bands and guided workouts with professional trainers. Receive $168 off from Black Friday through Cyber Monday.

MYXfitness focuses on science-backed, motivational workouts with cross-training coaches and next-level at-home equipment. Take $250 off and receive free shipping and assembly (valued at $250). Sign up to receive the newsletter when you buy a MYX, and you’ll also get an exclusive welcome offer and a holiday gift bundle (valued at $75).

NordicTrack has treadmills, bikes, ellipticals, rowers and other strength training equipment. The Commercial X22i is discounted $200 to $2,799, which includes a year of iFit family membership ($468 value).

Schwinn has a lineup of indoor cycling, recumbent bikes, upright bikes, Airdyne bikes as well as high-quality, affordable cardio machines.

Sharper Image has a space-saving adjustable rowing machine with a hydraulic cylinder that you set the resistance level ($189) plus discounts of up to 20% cash back and free shipping on order of $99 or more (use the code SHIP99).

Backcountry has deals up to 60% off on men’s, women’s and kids clothing plus hiking, camping, biking, climbing, running fly-fishing and paddling gear. Take 15% off your first order.

Jenson USA has Black Friday sales on bikes, jerseys, shorts, shoes and helmets. The retailer carries mountain, road, electric and commute bikes, kids’ bikes and apparel, with free shipping on order of $60 or more.

Moosejaw has bikes, gear, cycling clothing and accessories discounted up to 30% off.

Dick’s Sporting Goods has deals up to 50% off on fitness and recreation equipment like trampolines, bikes, basketball hoops and ping pong tables as well as outdoor, camping and hiking gear for the backyard or the backwoods, plus golf, footwear and outwear.

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The One Home Gym Upgrade a Fitness Pro Says You Need Happens To Be *Seriously* Discounted

We’ve all had those days when it was hard to trek up the stairs or even walk due to muscle soreness and tightness, and sometimes foam rolling and stretching just doesn’t cut it. If you need to up the ante on your recovery routine, The Theragun Elite ($399) will loosen your tightest knots. And in honor of Black Friday, you can score it for $100 off its usual price.

The tool acts as an in-home percussive therapy treatment, and has become a cult-fave among gym-goers for its ability to relieve tension. It uses targeted, rapid pulses, which helps to induce blood flow to your soft tissues. As a result, you get less muscle tightness and enhanced mobility. According to research, body percussion can lead to better physical and mental health, and one study found that it can decrease the levels of lactic acid in your muscles for up to 48 hours after a workout. “Vibrational therapy can help with pain, muscle soreness or tightness, and recovery,” Lauren Lobert, DPT and owner of APEX Physical Therapy previously told Well+Good. “It can be an inexpensive alternative to massage to help maintain performance by working out knows and preventing the build-up of lactic acid in the muscles.”



a person standing in front of a curtain: Screen Shot 2020-11-23 at 2.30.40 PM


© Photo: Therabody
Screen Shot 2020-11-23 at 2.30.40 PM

While all of Therabody’s devices will give your muscles this sort much-needed massage (in two minutes flat, by the way), the Elite has become a fan favorite for a number of reasons. It’s the quietest device in the brand’s collection, and its slender design allows you to take it with you no matter where you are, making it the ultimate partner for every workout. It features an OLED screen and wireless charging capabilities (yay for no cords!), and you can pair it with the Therabody app for a more personalized experience. Thanks to an ergonomic, multi-grip handle, the device allows you to reach all of those hard-to-reach muscle knots, and you can choose between five different speeds to ensure you’re getting exactly the treatment you need. So what are you waiting for? Go get your percussive buddy (for a seriously discounted price) and say goodbye to muscle soreness once and for all.

Shop now: Theragun Elite, $299 ($399 Value)



icon: Theragun Elite


© Photo: Therabody
Theragun Elite

Shop now: Theragun Elite, $299 ($399 value)

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Home Fitness Innovator FORME Life Launches Nationwide Retail Rollout With Westfield Shopping Centers

Designed by Yves Béhar, the elegant at-home wellness solution curates workouts based on users’ ability, goals, and lifestyle. To suit a range of personal preferences, the retail stores will display two distinct offerings: Studio, a mirrored display that transforms to offer live and on-demand content, and Studio Lift, which includes resistance training equipment that conveniently tucks away when not in use.

This retail launch marks the first time customers will be able to purchase FORME Life in person, having garnered significant interest since announcing pre-orders in May of this year. Customers will now be able to experience the stylish equipment and world class content before placing an order. The stores and kiosks will feature both the Studio and Studio Lift, empowering customers to select the best option for their lifestyle. Flagship locations will measure approximately 1,000 square feet and Kiosks will be around 400 square feet, both featuring clean lines and minimalist design to complement FORME Life’s aesthetic. In addition, retail stores will feature an exclusive fragrance partnership with Virtuvi and custom artwork by Anoushka Mirchandani.

“We are delighted to welcome FORME Life to some of our most affluent centers across the country,” said Colin Shaughnessy, EVP, US leasing. “Their new-to-market stores are an exciting addition to our lineup of wellness boutiques, fitness offerings, and cutting-edge technologies that aim to revolutionize the modern shopping experience. Now, more than ever, home fitness is an important category as our guests look to access workouts and build a fitness routine from the comfort of their own home.”

“We are so excited to see FORME Life out in the world and have been waiting for this since we began to create our Studios. We love that people can finally experience what we believe to be the very best in home fitness. For this reason, Westfield Shopping Centers have purposefully placed FORME Life within their luxury lifestyle stores and experiences.” – Trent Ward, Founder and CEO

About FORME Life

Designed by Yves Béhar, FORME Life delivers an unparalleled at-home fitness experience. The Studios uniquely transform to host a variety of workouts and activities, returning to an elegant, full-length mirror when not in use. What’s more, an ultra-high definition touch-screen display is the closest thing to a one-on-one interactive experience with a personal trainer.

To suit a range of user preferences, FORME Life offers two distinct models: Studio ($2495 or as little as $69/month for 36 months) and Studio Lift ($4495 or as little as $125/month for 36 months), which includes resistance training equipment that uniquely tucks away when not in use. FORME Life’s ever-evolving original content can be experienced by everyone in the household for a $39/month multi-user membership.

To learn more, please visit formelife.com and on Instagram.

Media Contact
Gabrielle Perez 
Jack Taylor PR 
[email protected]

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Coronavirus transmission at home ‘common,’ over 50% household contacts infected, CDC finds

Coronavirus spread within households is common, and “substantial transmission” occurs from both children and adults, according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Health officials have been warning about virus transmission occurring inside homes. Dr. Deborah Birx, White House coronavirus task force coordinator, for instance, has warned that coronavirus-related closures of public places won’t stop virus spread in this phase of the pandemic, where at-home gatherings are contributing to cases, reported the Chicago Tribune. 

CLICK HERE FOR FULL CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE

 Also, Dr. Allison Arwady, commissioner of the Chicago Department of Public Health, has said: “In fact where we see the spread of COVID-19 is where we let down our guard, where we literally let down our mask because we feel comfortable with those we love, but the virus is just looking for opportunities to spread.”

In its latest report, the CDC assessed 101 households in Nashville, Tenn., and Marshfield, Wis., from April to September. The households included 101 index patients (or the believed source of infection) and 191 household contacts. These people took self-samples for the virus everyday for two weeks.

Over half (53%) of all household contacts were infected and “secondary infections occurred rapidly, with approximately 75% of infections identified within 5 days of the index patient’s illness onset,” the health agency wrote.

Younger index patients aged 12 to 17 years infected about 38% of household contacts, according to the data.

CORONAVIRUS IN THE US: STATE-BY-STATE BREAKDOWN

The CDC advises using separate bathrooms and bedrooms, if possible, to reduce virus spread at home, among other measures. (iStock)

The CDC advises using separate bathrooms and bedrooms, if possible, to reduce virus spread at home, among other measures. (iStock)

To lower the risk of virus spread at home, the CDC recommends isolating immediately upon coronavirus-like symptoms, testing positive, or testing due to high-risk exposure, whichever happens first. Also, everyone should wear masks in shared spaces at home.

Members of the same household should use separate bedrooms and bathrooms if possible, the CDC wrote. Finally, a significant number of infected people in the study were asymptomatic, which further emphasizes the importance of isolation, the agency wrote.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

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Egyptian NHS doctor stricken by Covid seeks visa reassurances from Home Office



a man holding a fish: Dr Basem Enany has thanked the more than 4,000 people who donated to a crowdfunder to pay for his legal and medical bills.


© Photograph: GoFundMe/PA
Dr Basem Enany has thanked the more than 4,000 people who donated to a crowdfunder to pay for his legal and medical bills.

An Egyptian NHS doctor who became critically ill after complications from contracting Covid-19, has spoken for the first time about his fears of being removed from the UK by the Home Office while he lay in his hospital bed on a ventilator.

Dr Basem Enany, a locum consultant cardiologist at York teaching hospital, had treated many coronavirus patients. He was placed on a ventilator after developing Guillain-Barré syndrome, a rare complication of Covid-19 and other viruses, which has left him partially paralysed. He can now breathe unaided but believes he has a long rehabilitation journey ahead of him.

“At first I had the usual symptoms of Covid – cough, fever, loss of taste and smell – but then I began to develop a weakness throughout my body. Then I was no longer able to move and couldn’t breathe properly.” he said. “I had never seen this happen in any of the Covid patients I had treated and had to research my symptoms as they were so unusual.”

He has a work visa that is due to expire next month. He and his wife, Marwa Mohamed, believe they and their four young daughters could face removal from the UK as he is unlikely to be well enough by December to renew the visa.

While Enany has regained partial use of his hands, his legs remain paralysed and he is waiting to be moved from Leeds general infirmary to a specialist neuro-rehabilitation facility. “I was not sedated on the ventilator and was lying awake in my hospital bed thinking: ‘Oh my God, my visa is about to finish,’” he said.

Enany thanked the dedicated NHS workers who have been looking after him and the more than 4,000 people who have made donations to a crowdfund that will pay for his legal and medical bills. Any remaining funds will be donated to research into Covid-19 and into Guillain-Barré syndrome.

While the Home Office has said it had no plans to deport the family, Enany does not know what kind of replacement visa he will receive, how long it will be for and whether it will allow work.

While Enany thanked the Home Office for its reassurances, he said: “We still don’t have any solid documents in our hands and my visa will expire soon.”

A Home Office spokesperson said: “We’ve spoken to Dr Enany’s family to reassure them that their immigration status is not in jeopardy and they are not facing enforcement action. They are here entirely legally and have every right to remain the UK. We will continue to work with them to find a way forward. Our thoughts remain with Dr Enany and his family at this difficult time.”

On Friday there will be the second reading of a private member’s bill from Liberal Democrat MP Christine Jardine calling for indefinite leave to remain to

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Coronavirus-laden nursing home loses federal Medicare funding

A Kansas nursing home has lost its federal Medicare funding after an investigation revealed faulty practices led to widespread coronavirus infection and 10 deaths.

An onsite investigation at Andbe Home, Inc. in Norton, Kansas, revealed noncompliance with federal requirements for long-term care facilities, according to Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) documents obtained by Fox News. 

The survey investigation by the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services cited “widespread immediate jeopardy” to resident health and safety, according to the documents. The facility was also slammed with a $14,860 federal civil money penalty while it worked to correct noncompliance back in May.

A Kansas nursing home has lost its federal Medicare funding after a state investigation revealed faulty practices led to widespread coronavirus infection and 10 deaths. 

A Kansas nursing home has lost its federal Medicare funding after a state investigation revealed faulty practices led to widespread coronavirus infection and 10 deaths. 
(iStock)

CLICK HERE FOR FULL CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE

Stephen Crystal, director of the Center for Health Services Research at the Rutgers Institute for Health, told Fox News that the move marks CMS’ “ultimate penalty; decertifying a facility.”

“Most of the time, they try very hard do other things before they go to that step [like civil monetary penalties],” he said, adding “CMS actually doesn’t do this very often, and one could argue that they haven’t moved quickly enough on other facilities that had out of control spread,” referencing New Jersey and New York as examples.

In the case of the Kansas facility, staff identified two symptomatic patients on Oct. 5 and confirmed positive test results two days later but failed to separate them from the rest of the residents.

‘ALARMING RATE’ OF CORONAVIRUS INFECTION AMONG GROCERY STORE WORKERS, STUDY FINDS

“During this time, COVID-19 positive residents cohorted with COVID-19 negative residents, with only a curtain between them, against [Centers for Disease and Prevention Control] guidelines and best practice to prevent the spread of highly contagious COVID-19,” said the documents obtained by Fox News. The facility also allowed communal dining for two days after they discovered the symptomatic patients.

These failures, among others described in the report, ultimately exposed all 61 residents to the virus, every single one testing positive, which led to one hospitalization and 10 deaths. By Oct. 19, 37 staff members tested positive.

Crystal wasn’t privy to all the details but upon a brief account said, “It sounds pretty egregious.” 

The facility’s administrator, Megan Mapes, received a notice of a 23-day involuntary termination of the Medicare provider agreement: “We have determined that Andbe Home, Inc. no longer meets the requirements for participation as a skilled nursing facility in the Medicare program under Title XVIII of the Social Security Act.”

These failures, among others described in the report, ultimately exposed all 61 residents to the virus. 

These failures, among others described in the report, ultimately exposed all 61 residents to the virus. 
(iStock)

The termination will go into effect Nov. 18, 2020.

CMS informed Mapes that the Medicare program won’t pay for covered services to patients admitted to the facility on or after Oct. 27, 2020. Medicare will cover patients admitted before that date for up to 30 days “to ensure residents are successfully relocated.”

The facility was

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Nursing home VP says federal inspection diverted resources to COVID response during nation’s first outbreak

The executive in charge of the nursing home where the first known outbreak of coronavirus patients erupted in the U.S. says a federal inspection diverted precious time from her staff’s desperate efforts to care for critically ill residents. Bill Whitaker and his team were the first reporters allowed inside the Life Care Center in Kirkland, Washington, since the outbreak there last February. His report reveals the details of the early stages of a medical emergency that soon grew into a pandemic and the federal government’s bungled response to it. The report will be broadcast on 60 Minutes, Sunday, November 1at 7 p.m. ET/PT on CBS.  

Nancy Butner, a vice president at Life Care Centers of America who ran the Kirkland facility for 14 years, was desperate for more staff. Forty of them, including the medical director, could no longer come to work because they had COVID-19 symptoms. She asked the federal government for an emergency team of doctors and nurses. A team of doctors and nurses did come five days later, but not before the federal government sent a team in to inspect Life Care Center of Kirkland in the middle of the outbreak. “It was infuriating– they didn’t truly understand COVID or what the facility was going through,” Butner tells Whitaker. “Hours of staff time were averted to managing a survey process instead of managing a crisis in the facility and patient care.”    

Life Care Center says inspectors from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services interviewed staff and demanded documentation, diverting 400 hours of staff time away from patient care. “They knew how many staff were lost. They knew how many patients were hospitalized. They knew there was a lot of  patients that were sick and it was an unknown virus,” says Butner. “I explained that to them. But I can’t… tell them to leave.”   

60 Minutes searched hundreds of public documents and turned up emails that show state health officials pressed the governor’s office to call off the inspection. Dr. Jeffery Duchin, the head of outbreak response at Public Health Seattle-King County called the inspection “Not an appropriate use of precious time.” He tells Whitaker he believes the government knew its investigation was taking place during a public health emergency at a critical time. “I don’t have any reason to believe it. That it was a mix-up. I believe it was an intentional decision to conduct a survey at that time.”    

Says Butner, “I think they wanted a scapegoat for what happened at Life Care Center Kirkland. I think that they wanted someone to blame for COVID-19 spreading. We had nothing to do with the spread across the nation.”

60 Minutes wanted to ask Seema Verma, the federal administrator in charge of the inspection, about the timing of the inspection and the findings, but her office declined multiple requests for an on-camera interview.  

Life Care was fined more than $600,000 by the federal government and state inspectors working with federal investigators working with federal investigators found the

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Residents test positive at Kansas nursing home

MISSION, Kan. — A nursing home where every resident has tested positive for the coronavirus in a rural Kansas county with the state’s highest infection rate has been removed from the Medicare program, putting its funding at risk.

A scathing report from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services cited a lack of masks as a main driver in the outbreak at the Andbe Home in Norton, Kansas. Sixty-one residents and about three dozen staff members have been infected at the home, and 12 have died.

That outbreak, along with one at a nearby state prison, has brought Norton County to the point where 106 out of every 1,000 residents have contracted the virus.


The federal report said infected residents were kept in the same rooms with those who were not sick, with only a sheet separating them. Communal dining continued for two days after residents began showing symptoms, and even then the facility waited a week before testing all its residents.

Amid the outbreak, the report said, six different staff members also were observed with their masks removed. The report said the failures “placed all residents in immediate jeopardy.

The agency said the facility faces $14,860 in fines and that it will lose its Medicare funding effective Nov. 18, although its temporary manager, Mission Health Communities, hopes to make adequate changes before then.

Mission Health, which took over the facility on Wednesday, is working to help restore compliance — an effort that will involve boosting testing and infection control precautions, ensuring adequate person protective equipment and restricting visitors, said Cheri Kauset, the company’s vice president of customer experience and communications.

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HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— WHO says Europe has reached 10 million coronavirus cases

— Spain to keep state of emergency until May 2021

— Pope Francis ends general public audiences amid virus surge in Italy

— U.S. public health experts say the nation’s response to the crises has been marked by grave missteps and missed opportunities.

— ‘Difficult winter’: Europe divided on lockdowns as cases soar. EU leaders try to coordinate their approach to virus testing, tracing and vaccines.

— Advertising executive feeds downtrodden Venezuelans from his bicycle seat. Every day, he hands out corn flour patties known as arepas to the hungry.

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— Follow AP’s coronavirus pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

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HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING:

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah Epidemiologist Dr. Angela Dunn said protestors were at her home Thursday morning after her personal information was leaked online.

Dunn said it was “scary and wrong” that anyone would feel comfortable sharing her personal information. It was unclear which group organized the protest and why they were protesting.

“It’s taken a really big toll on my family and myself,” Dunn said when asked about the protest during the governor’s weekly COVID-19 briefing. “I think it’s really unfortunate we live in a state where people feel that it is OK to harass civil servants,”

Gov. Gary Herbert

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40 Dead, Now 40 Laid Off: Inside a Nursing Home in Crisis

When the state closed down swimming pools, his job at Clove Lakes became the couple’s only source of income. Staying home was no longer an option.

“When I came back, the supervisors and directors were staying in the home all night, and asking anyone to take extra shifts. Usually I don’t do that, but I volunteered because I knew that was going to happen anyway.” At home, he feared carrying the virus to his girlfriend’s mother and aunt, who lived in the same house, so he would strip his clothes and put them in the washer every time he returned.

At Clove Lakes, the virus shut down all of their ordinary activities, changing the relationships between the workers and the residents. The administration worked to get masks, gowns and other protective equipment, which many homes lacked. “We were wearing hazmat suits,” Mr. McArthur said, adding that it felt like being in a sauna. “I lost a lot of pounds. So I didn’t catch the quarantine weight like everybody else did.”

The emotional stress was unrelenting, he said. Once employees reported to the Covid unit, they could not leave or see other colleagues until the day’s end. Residents, especially those with dementia, often did not understand why their relatives were not visiting, why they could not leave their rooms and be with their neighbors for meals or activities.

“The worst was when you had to tell them they had to go back in their room, because the resident in the next room passed away, and you have to put them in a body bag,” Mr. McArthur said.

“One day you’ll see an ambulette come in and haul someone out and they’ll never come back,” Mr. McArthur said. “It is the worst experience to have.” Each death took a toll on the staff, but there was no time to grieve, he said. “You develop chemistry with someone, and it’s like they’re part of the family or a close friend. And we are all they have sometimes, especially after they stopped having visitors.”

The home did not provide counselors to help the staff deal with stress, but directed them to a hotline set up by the state office of mental health, Ms. Senk, the administrator, said.

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Beginner Medicine Ball Exercises For Home Workouts

medicine ball workout

I couldn’t text “Yes” fast enough when a friend sent out a mass text to our group offering up her medicine ball to any eager home gym takers. Lucky for me, my eagerness paid off, and I snagged the secondhand medicine ball to round out my home gym a little more. There was one problem: I didn’t really know what to do with the new 12-pound addition in my life.

I reached out to NASM-CPT personal trainer and Crunch Fitness Manager Bente Smart to devise a medicine ball workout that will get me sweating, and let’s just say: mission accomplished. “Working with medicine balls not only can serve as an interesting alternative to dumbbells and other resistance equipment but also helps to develop coordination and balance,” Smart explained. “It also helps to develop explosive power and overall build body strength.”

See the workout that’s been making me sweat through my Armour® Mid Crossback Sports Bra ($35). Complete all four exercises in a circuit for three rounds to feel that all over burn.

Ball Slams (Burns calories, increases cardio, develops explosive power and strength):

  • Stand with your feet shoulder length apart and knees bent.
  • Holding the ball in your hands, lift the ball up over your head.
  • Throw the ball down in front of your feet while coming down into a squat, being sure to use your legs here and not just your arms. (Editor note: If you’re in an apartment, try taking this move outside to a local park.)
  • Catch the ball when it bounces off the floor and start again.
  • Repeat for 10-15 reps.

Ball Twists (Strengthens the core and obliques):

  • Sit down and hold the ball in your hands.
  • Lift your feet off the ground and sit on your tailbone (or modify for more beginners by resting your heels lightly on the floor).
  • Lean back keeping your chest up and your back flat.
  • Twist your torso right to left touching the ball to the ground on each side, making sure that you are not just moving your arms side to side but are twisting at the torso as much as you can.
  • Keep that core tight and relax your shoulders
  • Repeat for 10 to 15 reps.

Squat to Overhead Press (Works the full body from the glutes and legs to the shoulders and core):

  • Stand with the ball at chest height, feet shoulder-width apart in a squat stance.
  • Go into a squat holding your chest up and the ball close to the body.
  • Come to standing and squeeze your glutes and press the ball overhead, making sure your abs are engaged to protect your back.
  • Bring the ball back to chest height and repeat.
  • Repeat for 10-15 reps.

Lunge to Twist (Works the full body from the glutes and legs to the shoulders and core):

  • From a standing position with your feet shoulder-width apart, hold the ball close to your chest.
  • Step out with your right foot into a lunge position.
  • As you step out, press the ball
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