Black Resident Dies After Childbirth, Highlights Tragic Trend

Chaniece Wallace, MD, a chief pediatric resident at the Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis, died on October 24 after complications from preeclampsia 4 days after giving birth prematurely by cesarean delivery, according to her husband, Anthony Wallace.

Their daughter, Charlotte Wallace, was born on October 20 weighing 4.5 pounds. She entered care in the neonatal intensive care unit.

Anthony Wallace told Chaniece’s story on a GoFundMe page, writing: “On October 20th, 2020 [Chaniece’s] doctors informed us that she was developing symptoms of preeclampsia.” He added that she had a ruptured liver and high blood pressure and that her kidney function was declining.

“Chaniece fought with every piece of strength, courage, and faith she had available,” he continued.

In announcing Wallace’s death, Riley Hospital for Children wrote that “it is with grievous and broken hearts that we announce the loss of one of our beloved friends, colleagues, and co-chiefs.” Chaniece “suffered postpartum complications after delivering a healthy 35wk baby girl. [S]he received excellent care at her delivery hospital by a complete and equally devastated healthcare team.”

Fellow co–chief resident Eric Raynal, MD, told Medscape Medical News that Chaniece’s preeclampsia “developed unusually rapidly. It was captured immediately and was especially severe,” he said.

“I think everyone in our community and the medical community that took care of her while hospitalized is at a loss for why her case of preeclampsia was so severe and did not improve after she delivered her baby, Charlotte,” he said.

“As physicians, we try to find answers and reason for everything we do in our practice of medicine, and it is so immensely frustrating when families ask us to explain things that are unexplainable,” Raynal said.

The statement from Riley Hospital said Wallace had completed her pediatrics residency in June and was beginning to explore career options as a general outpatient pediatrician.

“[H]er future impact, sure to be expansive, was taken away from her all too suddenly,” the announcement said.

Black Women at Triple the Risk for Maternal Death

Clinicians commented on social media that Wallace’s death highlights a grim statistic in healthcare in the United States: Black, Native American, and Alaska Native women are two to three times more likely to die from pregnancy-related causes than White women, according to recent Centers for Disease Control data.

Newborn hospitalist Shawnté James, MD, mourned Wallace’s death on Twitter, saying, “Childbirth isn’t safe for Black Women in America. This is crushing.”

Rachel Vreeman, MD, added: “Heart-broken over a new loss: a female pediatrician at a great academic medical center, with the same terrible pregnancy complication that I had. Except she is Black and she died.”

Raynal said, “What we know and can verify is that preeclampsia is more common in Black women. We would not say Chaniece’s preeclampsia and preeclampsia in women in general is ‘preventable.’ “

Raynal said Wallace was well aware of her risk and that they had talked privately about it routinely. She had also discussed the risks with her medical team.

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AHA News: Study Highlights Heart-Health Issues for Adults Who Were Preemies | Health News

(HealthDay)

American Heart Association News

MONDAY, Oct. 26, 2020 (American Heart Association News) — Erin Wegener was a tiny baby facing enormous challenges.

Born at 29 weeks’ gestation, she weighed only 1 pound, 14 ounces. Her first three months were lived in the neonatal intensive care unit. Family photos show her covered in gauze, sustained by too many tubes to count. Her entire hand just about fit inside her father’s wedding ring.

Her parents were warned she could face a lifetime of mental and physical challenges. But today, she’s working as a music therapist in the same hospital system in Grand Rapids, Michigan, where she was born.

The doctors’ most dire warnings didn’t come true, and her premature birth has never been much of a factor in her adult life. “I feel very thankful that I have not had a lot of health issues growing up,” she said.

Wegener was born in 1985, just a few years before breakthroughs in treatment allowed many more extremely low birth weight babies to survive. As that wave of children enters adulthood, a new study is revealing details about possible risks to their heart health.

Research published Monday in the American Heart Association journal Hypertension compared cardiovascular health among two groups of Australians born in 1991 and 1992, as they turned 25 years old. The 165 participants in the first group were born extremely preterm (earlier than 28 weeks’ gestation) or with an extremely low birth weight (below 2.2 pounds). The 127 participants in the second group were born at term and at normal weights.

Researchers looked at several factors related to heart health and calculated a cardiovascular health score for each person. Overall, the extremely premature/low birth weight group had a less favorable rating than the term-born group, specifically for blood pressure, exercise capacity, fasting blood glucose (a marker of diabetes) and visceral abdominal fat (“belly fat,” which has been linked to heart disease, cancer and more).

It was known that people born early are prone to such problems, said the study’s lead author Dr. Jeanie Cheong, a professor at the Royal Women’s Hospital in Melbourne, Australia. But the new research sought to tie the risks together for an overall view, she said. “We looked at all these factors cumulatively, rather than individually, thus providing a holistic view to health.”

Her work is part of the ongoing Victorian Infant Collaborative Study, which has been monitoring a group of Australians since their birth in 1991 or 1992. That’s the era when some treatments became widespread – such as corticosteroids for at-risk pregnant women to accelerate lung growth of babies in utero or using wetting-like agents called surfactants to treat immature lungs in premature babies.

Those treatments led to what Cheong called an exponential rise in survival over a short period for preemies. Before the 1970s, the survival rate of extremely preterm babies was below 10%, she said. By the early 1990s, that rate had soared to nearly 70%. It’s now at 87%, according to

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Sentry stands with Ryan White Clinics as study highlights importance of funding and 340B program in managing HIV/AIDS epidemic

Sentry stands with Ryan White Clinics as study highlights importance of funding and 340B program in managing HIV/AIDS epidemic

PR Newswire

DEERFIELD BEACH, Fla., Oct. 26, 2020

DEERFIELD BEACH, Fla., Oct. 26, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Sentry Data Systems, Inc., the nation’s leader in pharmacy procurement, compliance and utilization management, announced today a new analysis from Ryan White Clinics for 340B Access, a nonprofit organization of HIV/AIDS medical providers of which Sentry is a benefactor. The study highlights the importance of Ryan White Clinics in effectively treating the conditions, and it suggests that any reductions in federal funding or to the 340B drug benefits the clinics depend on would have a devastating effect on efforts to manage the public health crisis.

Sentry stands with Ryan White Clinics as study highlights importance of funding, 340B program in managing HIV/AIDS epidemic
Sentry stands with Ryan White Clinics as study highlights importance of funding, 340B program in managing HIV/AIDS epidemic

“Ryan White Clinics are an indispensable part of our nation’s healthcare safety net and play an effective role in treating an especially vulnerable group of Americans,” said Travis Leonardi, founder and CEO of Sentry Data Systems. “Sentry is proud to support Ryan White Clinics for 340B Access and its members through advocacy, technology and the expertise they need to maximize their 340B benefits and continue providing high-quality care to their patients.”

Ryan White Clinics for 340B Access (RWC-340B) is a national organization of health care clinics and service providers that receive support under the federal Ryan White CARE Act, which provides funds for services used primarily by indigent and uninsured people with HIV/AIDS. Ryan White providers are also eligible for the federal 340B Drug Discount Program and use it to expand affordable access to expensive and life-saving HIV/AIDS medications. Sentry is a Platinum Level Benefactor of RWC-340B and has made a significant donation to the nonprofit in 2020 to help share important 340B-related information with its members.

The new data-driven white paper comes as the 340B program is under assault from drug manufacturers and as the federal government is pushing Medicare Part B rate cuts for 340B drugs. It states that any reduction in resources, including 340B Drug Pricing Program savings, could have long-term consequences for patients served through Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program-funded clinics, including disruptions in care and treatment, adverse health outcomes, or increased healthcare expenses.

On Oct. 9, RWC-340B filed a federal lawsuit against the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and its Health Resources and Services Administration. It seeks action against four drug manufacturers that have refused to sell 340B-discounted drugs to covered entities when ordered through a contract pharmacy.

“Given the sustained and serious threats to the 340B program, this white paper and analysis reveals important facts about the critical role Ryan White clinics play in the safety net,” said Mark Malahosky, RPh BPharm, Vice President, Pharmacy Services, Trillium Health and Treasurer of Ryan White Clinics for 340B Access. “This report proves what we’ve known all along: harm to the 340B program means dangerous consequences for public health and

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Conroe ISD board highlights dyslexia’s impact on learning

For hundreds of students and parents in the Conroe Independent School District, dyslexia and other reading and learning disabilities have had a significant impact on their education. As part of Dyslexia Awareness Month, the CISD Board of Trustees included a special recognition of dyslexia at its Tuesday meeting.

A group of parents with students with reading disorders has been in conversation with the district for a while now about how dyslexia services are conducted, which programs are being used, what they want the district to put more resources into, and the funding that the district dyslexia services receive.

“The Texas Education Agency and the American Institutes of Research identify dyslexia as “the most commonly diagnosed learning disability” affecting the education of children. Students experiencing dyslexia may also struggle with related disorders such as dysgraphia, dyscalculia, developmental auditory imperceptions, dysphasia, specific developmental dyslexia, developmental dysgraphia, and developmental spelling disability,” according to the special recognition that the board included. “The most recent data available from the Texas Education Agency indicates that only 3.5% to 4.0% of Texas students are identified as dyslexic. Peer-reviewed research indicates that up to 20% of the student population may suffer from the difficulties associated with dyslexia.”

Board member Scott Moore, who recommended the recognition, read a special proclamation to be included in the official meeting minutes.

Nicole May is a district parent with two sons, both diagnosed with dyslexia, and a member of the parent group. She has addressed the board several times to talk about dyslexia services and what the parent group thinks the district could be doing better. At Tuesday’s meeting, she brought her younger son to say hello to the board, and thank them for the special recognition. But she also took the opportunity to continue her advocacy.


“My goal tonight is to continue keeping dyslexic students in our district a focus and to continue addressing the need for more for our population,” May said. “The questions I ponder often are ‘Do the decision-makers in our district see the need for more for our population? And do you see the potential of our population in society?’”

While looking over STAAR data for the district from the 2019-20 May said she found the dyslexia population identified in some of the scores for writing and reading tests that did not meet the state average. She questioned why the district started a new dyslexia program last year, asking directly if it was because there were students in the district that were no thriving under the old program.

“My insight, it was not the previous program that failed these students,” May said. “Rather, it was the lack of commitment to execute the program to the level required to gain success.”

In her previous addresses to the board, May encouraged the district to use the maximum time allowable for dyslexia services instead of the minimum and to keep dyslexia services classes to the smallest number of students each to allow for more personal instruction.

May was not the only

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Sidra Medicine highlights mental health services for children, young people and perinatal women

Sidra Medicine, has partnered with the Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) in its national mental health and wellness campaign “Are you ok” to highlight the support services available for women, children and young people in Qatar.

Professor. Muhammed Waqar Azeem, the Chair of Psychiatry at Sidra Medicine said, “The pandemic has changed the landscape regarding the critical need for robust mental health support systems.  It is very assuring and speaks to the caliber of the healthcare services in Qatar, to see how the Ministry of Public Health and Sidra Medicine have rapidly mobilized to keep mental health on top of the country’s service agenda. At Sidra Medicine, we remain committed to supporting the people of Qatar, particularly children, young people and perinatal women in meeting their mental health care needs. In addition to world class mental health services, our Department of Psychiatry has started a number of educational and training programs and is also involved in various leading-edge mental health related research projects.”

Sidra Medicine, a QF entity, offers Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Adolescent Medicine and Perinatal Mental Health services in Qatar. The services are either referral based (in the case of children) or self-referral/ direct (perinatal mental health services).

Sidra Medicine’s Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) is available for children ages five to eighteen (5-18) years and includes outpatient, inpatient, consultation liaison and emergency care.  The service can be accessed via referral from Primary Health Care Centers, private clinics, schools and other sources.

Dr. Ahsan Nazeer, Division Chief of CAHMS at Sidra Medicine said: “As part of our ongoing efforts to strengthen mental health support services, we have focused on patient care, education to build local human resources, research and building community models of care in Qatar.  The success of our program is based on the collaboration of patients, their relatives and our staff, who all work to help achieve patient goals to live their lives as fully possible. I am also proud of our team’s achieving accreditation for the world’s first Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education International (ACGMEI).”

“Our advice to parents dealing with children with anxiety, especially during this time, is to encourage their children to share their concerns and have frank and open discussions about their fears and concerns.  It is also important that children obtain accurate information from reliable sources.

We also encourage parents to focus on instilling a sense of hope and optimism in their children by role modelling appropriate positive behaviours,” continued Dr. Nazeer.

Dr. Alanoud Al Ansari, Division Chief of Adolescent Medicine whose clinic provides developmentally appropriate mental health and medical care for adolescents aged 12 to 18 years old, has seen a rise in anxiety in teenagers.

“Teenagers are manifesting their anxiety around loss of control and unpredictability through eating disorders, depression and cutting. Many of them have not been able to cope being back at school. Despite families being in lock down and opting to stay home during the

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