Tag: health

 

CDC Recommends Face Masks in All Public Transportation Settings | Health News

By Robin Foster and E.J. Mundell
HealthDay Reporters

(HealthDay)

TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Seeking to slow the spread of coronavirus, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended on Monday that face masks be worn by everyone in all public transportation settings.

That includes both passengers and people working in stations, terminals and airports across the country, CBS News reported.

So far, the Trump administration has not issued any national mandate on face coverings, instead leaving that decision to state and local leaders.

In the new interim guidance, the CDC called masks “one of the most effective strategies available for reducing COVID-19 transmission.” Wide use of masks helps protect those at higher risk of severe illness from COVID-19 as well as workers who frequently come into close contact with other people in airports, bus terminals, train stations and seaports, the guidance stated.

Most U.S. airlines, Amtrak and many other transport companies already require passengers and staff to wear masks, CBS News reported. The CDC urged passengers and workers on all airplanes, ships, ferries, trains, subways, buses, taxis and ride-shares to follow suit.

For months, research has shown that face masks help curb the spread of COVID-19. In the new guidance, the CDC said everyone “should wear masks that cover both the mouth and nose when waiting for, traveling on, or departing from public [transportation]. People should also wear masks at an airport, bus or ferry terminal, train or subway station, seaport, or similar area that provides transportation.”

The guidance also urges transport operators to “refuse boarding to anyone not wearing a mask and require all people onboard, whether passengers or employees, to wear masks for the duration of travel,” with exceptions for eating, drinking and medical disorders that prohibit mask wearing.

Reopened NYC schools not seeing surge in COVID cases

Three weeks after becoming the first big urban area to reopen public schools since the pandemic began, New York City is not seeing a feared surge in cases among students and staff.

Instead, health officials are seeing a surprisingly small number of COVID-19 cases, The New York Times reported.

Of the more than 15,000 staff members and students tested randomly in the first week of its testing regimen, the city has gotten back results for close to 11,000. There were only 18 positives: 13 staff members and five students, the Times reported. Even better, when officials put mobile testing units at schools near the Brooklyn and Queens neighborhoods that have had new outbreaks, only four positive cases surfaced in more than 3,300 tests conducted since the last week of September, the newspaper said.

New York City is facing fears of a second wave of the virus fueled by local spikes in Brooklyn and Queens, and official have closed more than 120 public schools as a precaution, the Times reported.

Still, the sprawling system of 1,800 public schools is a bright spot as the city tries to recover from a pandemic that has killed thousands and weakened

Ehave Expands Its Psychedelic Mental Health Platform with Medchart, a Leader in Medical Record Software, as a Plugin to the Ehave Dashboard

Ehave partners with world-renowned tech platform, Medchart. The Medchart plugin will allow medical professionals using the Ehave Dashboard to easily transfer medical records, while allowing patients to own their own data and do what they want with it.

MIAMI, Oct. 20, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Ehave, Inc. (OTC Pink: EHVVF) (the “Company”), a provider of digital therapeutics delivering evidence-based therapeutic interventions to healthcare patients, announced today it has added Medchart, the only comprehensive solution for medical record exchange, as the first plugin to its Ehave Dashboard. This will not only allow patients to take more control over their psychedelic medical records, it will allow patients to access innovative treatments to mental health by providing clinicians and pharmaceutical companies with data that will make the provision of care more readily available. The combination of Medchart with the Ehave Dashboard will help provide a dataset that can be used to clinically validate some of these more experimental forms of therapy including psychedelics and ketamine treatment.

Personal Health Records (PHR) are a patient’s individualized collection of their health records. By allowing patients to own their own records, medical professionals and psychedelic researchers can begin working with patients to create biomarkers on the how they can live a longer healthier life, as well as what treatments are effective. Giving data to the PHR helps doctors who can prescribe medicine based on your data. As you add sensors into the dashboard you can add more data in your PHR. There are 11 million Americans who are resistant to most mental health therapies, and they can cost the healthcare system as much as $250 billion. Since major pharmaceutical companies don’t develop drugs for them, the Ehave Dashboard could potentially aggregate data from this patient population and provide that data to drug developers for clinical trials. This data could also help insurers route patients to the treatment providers who can help them the most.

Toronto-based Medchart, which enables the electronic transfer of medical records through express patient consent, simplifies the request of health information for patients. Medchart digitizes the exchange of health information between healthcare providers, attorneys, insurers, payers, researchers and patients while improving transfer speed, data quality, and business insights through artificial intelligence and machine learning. The company provides cloud based medical record solutions across North America with purpose-built solutions for personal injury and mass tort attorneys in the United States. Medchart complies with all federal and provincial privacy legislation including HIPAA, PIPEDA, PHIPA, PIPA, PHIA, HIA, and more.

The Ehave Dashboard is a data driven platform that has been strategically developed to provide better communication among medical practitioners and health care providers. The aggregation of data and information into one application has proven effective in streamlining the health process for both patients and providers. The Ehave Dashboard has been developed through years of testing with mental healthcare professionals at one of Canada’s largest hospitals, The Hospital for Sick Children in Ontario. In addition to providing better outcomes, the proprietary platform allows individuals to

Sidra Medicine highlights mental health services for children, young people and perinatal women

Sidra Medicine, has partnered with the Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) in its national mental health and wellness campaign “Are you ok” to highlight the support services available for women, children and young people in Qatar.

Professor. Muhammed Waqar Azeem, the Chair of Psychiatry at Sidra Medicine said, “The pandemic has changed the landscape regarding the critical need for robust mental health support systems.  It is very assuring and speaks to the caliber of the healthcare services in Qatar, to see how the Ministry of Public Health and Sidra Medicine have rapidly mobilized to keep mental health on top of the country’s service agenda. At Sidra Medicine, we remain committed to supporting the people of Qatar, particularly children, young people and perinatal women in meeting their mental health care needs. In addition to world class mental health services, our Department of Psychiatry has started a number of educational and training programs and is also involved in various leading-edge mental health related research projects.”

Sidra Medicine, a QF entity, offers Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Adolescent Medicine and Perinatal Mental Health services in Qatar. The services are either referral based (in the case of children) or self-referral/ direct (perinatal mental health services).

Sidra Medicine’s Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) is available for children ages five to eighteen (5-18) years and includes outpatient, inpatient, consultation liaison and emergency care.  The service can be accessed via referral from Primary Health Care Centers, private clinics, schools and other sources.

Dr. Ahsan Nazeer, Division Chief of CAHMS at Sidra Medicine said: “As part of our ongoing efforts to strengthen mental health support services, we have focused on patient care, education to build local human resources, research and building community models of care in Qatar.  The success of our program is based on the collaboration of patients, their relatives and our staff, who all work to help achieve patient goals to live their lives as fully possible. I am also proud of our team’s achieving accreditation for the world’s first Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education International (ACGMEI).”

“Our advice to parents dealing with children with anxiety, especially during this time, is to encourage their children to share their concerns and have frank and open discussions about their fears and concerns.  It is also important that children obtain accurate information from reliable sources.

We also encourage parents to focus on instilling a sense of hope and optimism in their children by role modelling appropriate positive behaviours,” continued Dr. Nazeer.

Dr. Alanoud Al Ansari, Division Chief of Adolescent Medicine whose clinic provides developmentally appropriate mental health and medical care for adolescents aged 12 to 18 years old, has seen a rise in anxiety in teenagers.

“Teenagers are manifesting their anxiety around loss of control and unpredictability through eating disorders, depression and cutting. Many of them have not been able to cope being back at school. Despite families being in lock down and opting to stay home during the

Be Fit? An ETF for Health & Fitness

The Global X Health & Wellness Thematic ETF (BFIT) seeks to harness the effects of changing consumer lifestyles by investing in companies geared toward promoting physical activity and well-being, asserts Jim Woods, editor of The Deep Woods.

The fund aims to provide investment results that correspond generally to the price and yield performance, before fees and expenses, of the Indxx Global Health & Wellness Thematic Index.

BFIT enables investors to access high-growth potential through companies at the leading edge of a long-term, health and wellness trend affecting multiple sectors of the global economy.

Composition of the ETF transcends classic sector, industry and geographic classifications by tracking an emerging theme. In a single trade, BFIT delivers access to dozens of companies with high exposure to the health and wellness sector.

Only 41% of the fund’s portfolio is invested in U.S. companies. BFIT’s other holdings are in foreign emerging markets. This strategy reflects that many industry powerhouses are based elsewhere.

For example, Puma SE and Adidas AG are headquartered in Germany; Shimano and Asics Corp. are in Japan and Fila Holdings Corp. is in South Korea. 

This exchange-traded fund provides diversification domestically and across the globe. Better yet, no individual stock represents more than 4% of the portfolio. The fund has $19.6 million in assets under management, a 0.35% average spread and 58 holdings.

BFIT currently trades around $23 and has a 0.55% dividend yield. The fund has been growing steadily since its inception in May 2016. It is up more than 50% since then, and with an increasing interest in healthy living and general wellness, the fund looks poised to continue growing higher.

The health and wellness ETF tracks an index of equities from companies that promote physical well-being. Its universe of holdings includes small-, mid- and large-cap public companies from developed countries that earn the majority of their revenue from the market niche or whose stated business objective relates to good physical health.

Health and wellness crosses the sector boundaries found in traditional classification systems to include nutrition and weight loss, nutritional supplements, fitness equipment and apparel, among others.

BFIT has a high expense ratio (0.75%) in comparison to other exchange-traded funds and, as a health and wellness fund, has a very different investment strategy than others in this segment.

I urge interested investors to exercise their own due diligence in deciding whether this fund fits personal portfolio goals and risk tolerance.

Subscribe to The Deep Woods here…

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6 Reasons to Buy the November Issue of Men’s Health Today

Fitness is about far more than your 5K time or the visibility of your abdominal muscles. At Men’s Health, we’ve long strived to present a more thoughtful and multi-faceted view of male health and fitness.

In this issue, you’ll find all the workouts, gear reviews and insider training hacks you’ve come to expect from MH, alongside a more holistic take on health, too. With our 10-page special, Black Minds Matter, we continue our commitment to raising awareness of men’s mental health issues in various sectors of society by looking at the way in which our health services have failed black men.

We also have six feelgood workouts to boost your mental energy and pump up your well-being, plus 31 tips for fortifying your heart against life’s stresses. That, and more besides.

Zack George: Britain’s Fittest Man

Zack George reached the zenith of his sport, only to see his dream dissolve. It has been an intense and busy year for the UK’s finest CrossFitter. This is how he found triumph in adversity to become stronger than ever – and why you need to get with the programming.

Fighting for Black Minds

Black British men are four times more likely than white men to be hospitalised for poor mental health, and are less likely to seek help before they reach crisis point. The system in place to support them is broken. How do we fix it?

The Best Eco Toys in Wellness

Minimising your environmental footprint needn’t mean trading in your Nike Zooms for hemp slippers. Brands at the sharp end of performance are investing time and energy intro crafting sustainable products. Here’s our pick of the best.

Mood-Boosting Workouts

Stressed out? The body part you need to target in your next workout is the one between your ears. With a little neurological know-how, your training sessions can expel anxiety and add muscle to flagging motivation. Get a lift from these.

New Ways to Pump Up Your Heart

Almost 80% of UK adults struggle with work-related stress, while heart diseases account for more than a quarter of British deaths. That means staying young at heart isn’t just a romantic cliche – it’s a doctor’s order. Our experts have their fingers on the pulse.

Your Daily Bread

Blame bowl food for the demise of the humble sandwich. Thankfully, London’s upper crust is making your staple lunch great again – in flavour and nutritious goodness. Make a meal of it.


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States file their vaccine plans to CDC without plans to pay for them, state health officials say

States still have no idea how they’re going to pay for coronavirus vaccine distribution, despite filing plans last week, state officials said Monday.



Dignity GoHealth worker Brandon Hastings uses an Abbott ID Now rapid antigen testing machine for United Airlines passengers who took tests at the SFO COVID-19 rapid testing site at San Francisco International Airport in San Francisco, Thursday, Oct. 15, 2020. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)


© Jeff Chiu/AP
Dignity GoHealth worker Brandon Hastings uses an Abbott ID Now rapid antigen testing machine for United Airlines passengers who took tests at the SFO COVID-19 rapid testing site at San Francisco International Airport in San Francisco, Thursday, Oct. 15, 2020. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

Friday was the deadline for states to submit their plans to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but they still don’t have the needed federal money to help carry them out, officials said.

“As it stands now, we do not have any capability to fund the imminent implementation of the plan,” James Blumenstock, senior vice president for pandemic response and recovery at the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, told reporters Monday.

The CDC distributed $200 million to states for preparedness and planning, Blumenstock said, which “certainly would not be sufficient at all for a campaign of this magnitude and duration.”

The association has asked Congress for $8.4 billion to help states distribute and administer vaccines to people once they became available.

“Even if the money was appropriated today, it would take time for those funds to reach the jurisdictions that in turn would need it,” Blumenstock said.

The funding for vaccines isn’t the only problem. Health officials are also having to deal with a very skeptical public. Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said Monday it may be a challenge to get people to take the vaccine.

“It would be a terrible shame if we have — and I think we will have — a safe and effective vaccine but we’re not able to widely distribute it to those who need it,” Fauci said in a virtual event for the National Academy of Medicine on Monday.

People at the highest risk of Covid-19 should get a vaccine once one is shown to be safe and effective, whereas healthy young people could possibly consider waiting for another vaccine, Fauci told CNN Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta on Monday.

The vaccine dilemma comes as Covid-19 cases continue to soar across the country. The next few months will be the “darkest of the pandemic,” Michael Osterholm, director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota, told NBC’s “Meet the Press” on Sunday.

As of Monday, there were more than 8.2 million cases and 220,086 coronavirus deaths in the United States, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

Osterholm highlighted the 70,000 cases of Covid-19 reported on Friday, which matched the largest number seen in the peak of the pandemic. Between now and the holidays, the US will see numbers “much, much larger than even the 67 to 75,000 cases,” he said.

LIVE UPDATES: The latest on the coronavirus pandemic

Fauci, however, said a nationwide lockdown is not the way forward unless the pandemic gets

California Won’t Allow Virus Vaccines Without State Approval | Health News

By DON THOMPSON, Associated Press

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California won’t allow any distribution of new coronavirus vaccines in the nation’s most populous state until it is reviewed by the state’s own panel of experts, Gov. Gavin Newsom said Monday.

Vaccinations for the pandemic “will move at the speed of trust,” said Newsom, a Democrat, and the state wants its own independent review no matter who wins the presidential election next month.

“Of course we won’t take anyone’s word for it,” Newsom said as he named 11 doctors and scientists to review any rollout of vaccines by the federal government or vaccine developers. They hail from top California universities and medical providers, along with state and local public health officials.

The pledge raises the possibility that California residents might not receive a vaccine as distribution begins in other states, though the governor said widespread vaccinations are unrealistic until sometime next year.

While there is always a risk that the vaccine could be delayed only in California, Dr. Jeffrey Klausner, a professor of epidemiology at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, said Newsom named a renowned group that should be able to quickly make credible decisions.

“I wouldn’t interpret this as a delay in distribution. I would interpret this as an effort to make sure that distribution is equitable and timely,” he said. “The people in this group are among the most reputable public health advocates in the state.”

As such, its finding that a particular vaccine was suitable or not suitable could have an outsize impact nationwide.

The group includes current and former members of the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, Klausner said, so any disagreement with the federal panel “could have substantial impact on that particular vaccine product.”

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo last month appointed a similar independent task force.

At most, 45 million doses will be available nationwide before the end of this year from the two most advanced vaccines, Newsom said. Each person must receive two doses, three weeks apart.

If California were to receive 12% of the doses, commensurate with its percentage of the nation’s population, that would be 5.4 million doses, or enough to treat 2.7 million of the state’s nearly 40 million residents.

Most would go to front-line medical workers and first responders, he said, then to the most vulnerable in the population.

Newsom’s announcement drew quick criticism from Republican state lawmakers, despite the governor’s contention that the panel is needed whoever is president.

“Politicizing the efficacy of a vaccine is shameful,” tweeted Sen. Melissa Melendez, who said the governor “used the virus to keep people from working, kids from going to school (and) families from being able to attend funerals.”

Newsom is “suggesting we can’t trust the FDA (but) Of course, we’ll continue trusting the FDA for every other drug whose distribution doesn’t threaten his hold on power,” tweeted Assemblyman Kevin Kiley, who has a court hearing this week challenging the governor’s authority to

What’s Best for Treating Bipolar Disorder? | Health News

By Alan Mozes
HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

MONDAY, Oct. 19, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Combining medication with group or family-based therapy gives patients struggling with bipolar disorder their best shot at living stable lives, a new review suggests.

“People with bipolar disorder have significant mood swings, from periods of depression to mania,” explained study author David Miklowitz, a professor of psychiatry with UCLA’s David Geffen School of Medicine’s Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Behavior.

“These episodes can last anywhere from a few days to weeks” before patients enter a so-called “recovery period,” Miklowitz explained. That is the point at which “people gradually stabilize in mood and try to return to their day-to-day responsibilities,” he said.

During recovery, some patients simply continue to receive psychiatric monitoring while taking medication, which typically involves mood stabilizers and antipsychotic drugs.

However, recovery can also be the ideal time to begin therapy alongside medications, Miklowitz noted.

And after comparing the effectiveness of medication alone against medication plus therapy, Miklowitz’s review concluded that more is more: Patients fared better at keeping mania and depression at bay through a combination of medication and therapy.

That was particularly true when therapy was conducted in a group setting or with family members.

The finding made sense to Dr.Timothy Sullivan, chair of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Staten Island University Hospital in New York City. He noted that most other studies “show that combining some form of psycho-therapy treatment with medications results in improved outcomes.” Sullivan wasn’t involved in the new research.

Miklowitz and colleagues reported their findings Oct. 14 in the journal JAMA Psychiatry.

Miklowitz noted that among bipolar patients depressive symptoms include low mood, sadness, inertia, fatigue, loss of interests in things, suicidal thoughts or attempts, and/or insomnia.

On the other hand, when bipolar patients experience mania, that can take the form of intense periods of excitement, euphoria, severe irritability with little need for sleep, increased energy and activity, and/or rapid-fire thinking and speech. It may also involve “grandiose thinking,” such as believing one is famous or endowed with “special powers.”

The review focused on 36 investigations involving adults and three involving adolescents, with a combined total of nearly 3,900 bipolar patients. Collectively the average age was about 37, with women accounting for roughly 60% of the patients.

Prior to each study launch, participants had already been taking medications for their bipolar disorder. In turn, some were randomly assigned to just stick with their prior care (with psychiatric support and monitoring). Others, however, were randomly assigned to participate in individual therapy, therapy involving family members or group therapy (without the involvement of close family members).

Broadly speaking, the various forms of therapy all aimed to help patients develop skills to manage their disorder, including how to maintain regular sleep patterns and how to stabilize depression or mania when symptoms arose.

All the studies tracked patient histories for a minimum of one year on, making note of all recurrences of mania and depression, alongside therapy drop-out rates.

The upshot:

In Medieval Times, Plagues ‘Sped Up’ With Each New Outbreak | Health News

By Cara Roberts Murez, HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

MONDAY, Oct. 19, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Medieval plague outbreaks in England picked up frightening speed in the 17th century, Canadian researchers report.

Their analysis of historical documents covering 300 years showed that outbreaks of the plague doubled every 11 days in London during the 1600s, compared to every 43 days in the 14th century.

“It is an astounding difference in how fast plague epidemics grew,” said lead author David Earn, an investigator with the Michael G. DeGroote Institute for Infectious Disease Research at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario.

No published death records were available for London before 1538.

So statisticians, biologists and evolutionary geneticists analyzed personal wills, parish registers and data used to monitor burials in London to estimate death rates. During medieval times, people typically wrote wills because they were dying or feared imminent death, so those were “a good proxy for the spread of fear and of death itself,” Earn said in a university news release.

Previous genetic studies identified the pathogen that causes plague, including the Black Death of 1348, which killed more than one-third of Europe’s population, and the Great Plague of 1665. But little was known about how the disease was transmitted.

This research suggests that it was not spread by human-to-human transmission. Growth rates for both epidemics are more consistent with bubonic plague, which is transmitted by bites of infected fleas, the researchers said.

They suspect population density, living conditions and cooler temperatures could explain the rapid acceleration.

“From genetic evidence, we have good reason to believe that the strains of bacterium responsible for plague changed very little over this time period, so this is a fascinating result,” said study co-author Hendrik Poinar, a professor of anthropology at McMaster.

Earn, Poinar and their colleagues said lessons of the past can be applied to modern-day pandemics like COVID-19. They developed a digitized archive that provides a way to analyze past patterns in search of new information about the spread of infectious disease.

The findings were published Oct. 19 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Copyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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New, Equitable NYC Health Care Needed After Coronavirus: Study

NEW YORK CITY — The coronavirus crisis showed equitable health care in New York City is a matter of life and death, a new study argues.

The study — “Toward a Resilient System of Health” — found Black and Hispanic city dwellers accounted for 62 percent of all COVID-19 fatalities. Together, the two groups are just 51 percent of the city’s population.

The outcomes showed the city’s primary focus should be to predict and proactively treat illness at a community level rather than provide reactive care when an individual gets sick, the study states.

“COVID-19 vividly demonstrated how social determinants of health— factors beyond direct medical services that influence overall health—are linked to disparate outcomes for Black and Hispanic populations,” the study states.

The Partnership for New York City released the study in collaboration with Deloitte. The group has garnered attention throughout the pandemic — first for warning a third of the city’s small businesses may go under, then by sending an open letter to Mayor Bill de Blasio signed by 167 business leaders.

The new study outlines a broad vision for the city’s health care system.

New York leaders should focus on not only rebuilding short-term trust in the health care system, but laying the groundwork for other city systems to support health and well-being, the study states.

It proposes the near-term support of science-based public health guidelines, a medium-term focus on community-based care and long-term reforms in Medicaid reimbursement, among many other proposals.

Read the full study here.

This article originally appeared on the New York City Patch

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