Kids sprout hair like werewolves after taking wrong medicine

It was a hair-raising mistake.

A group of children in Spain continues to sprout hair all over their bodies after they were accidentally administered a hair loss drug for their indigestion two years ago, Newsflash reported.

Health officials blame the hairy situation on a packaging mix-up by Spanish pharmaceutical giant Farma-Química Sur, which resulted in children in Cantabria mistakenly taking minoxidil — a topical treatment — in lieu of omeprazole, which is for gastric reflux.

As a result, a group of 20 children began suffering from hypertrichosis — also known as “werewolf syndrome” — in which the sufferer grows excess hair across their body, according to Healthline. One mother reported that her 10-month-old sported thick locks everywhere except his feet a mere two months after taking the minoxidil syrup, ABC reported.

Unfortunately, health officials weren’t alerted to the “Wolfman”-esque outbreak until July 2019, when the parents of the children went public. The furious families have since filed civil and criminal complaints against a laboratory and several companies for importing and distributing the drug as well as against two pharmacies in Cantabria which were later exonerated by the courts.

Despite the lawsuits, it reportedly took authorities two months to shutter the laboratory where the blunder occurred and recall the offending medication.

“Why does it take more than two months to test a medicine?” Amaia, a mother whose baby was afflicted, asked Spain’s Antena 3 television station at the time. “We have been told nothing. I am furious, scared and feel misunderstood and a complete lack of empathy.”

Two years later, the victims’ families claim that the toddlers continue to sprout hair despite treatment, and are demanding compensation. Unfortunately it’s unclear whether the symptoms can be remedied as the ailment’s naturally occurring form has no cure.

However, the afflicted can mitigate the cosmetic effects via shaving, waxing and laser hair removal.

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Hair Transplant Market revenue to cross USD 40 Bn by 2026: Global Market Insights, Inc.

Some of the major hair transplant market players include Allergan Plc, Bernstein Medical, Bosley, GETFUE Hair Clinics Ltd., Hair Restoration BlackRockHRBR, Hair Club, Venus Concept (NeoGraft), Hairline International Hair and Skin Clinic, Hair Transplant Centre Turkey, Hair Transplants of Florida, Cole Instruments Inc. among others.

Selbyville, Delaware, Oct. 26, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) —

According to latest report “Hair Transplant Market by Method (Follicular Unit Extraction [FUE], Follicular Unit Transplantation [FUT]), Product (Gel, Serum, Drugs, Multivitamins), Therapy (Platelet Rich Plasma, Stem Cell Therapy, Laser Therapy), Gender (Male, Female), Service Provider (Hospitals, Clinics, Surgical Centers), Regional Outlook, Price Trends, Competitive Market Share & Forecast 2026”, by Global Market Insights, Inc., the market valuation of hair transplant will cross $40.1 billion by 2026.

Rise in number of people suffering from hair loss in Middle East and Africa region will act as a high impact rendering factor for the market growth. Increase in number of people suffering from hair loss in the Middle Eastern countries has resulted in more young men opting for hair transplant procedures. The major factors contributing to male pattern baldness are stress, genetics, illness or medication, climatic and water condition along with physiological factors such as malnutrition and ageing. According to the recently published article, around 60% of the male population in Middle East region is expected to experience hair loss in their lifetime, as compared to global average of 40%.

Request for a sample of this research report @ https://www.gminsights.com/request-sample/detail/2810

Recent technological advancements, automation and cost-effectiveness of hair transplant procedure will drive the market value. Rising demand for single session hair restoration surgeries coupled with increase in awareness regarding physical appearance will further propel the market revenue.

Follicular unit extraction (FUE) segment in the hair transplant market valued more than USD 3,270 million in 2019 impelled by the rising number of men suffering from pattern baldness and growing adoption of the technologically advanced hair transplant methods by the surgeons. Furthermore, growing prevalence of alopecia cases coupled with increase in aging population base across the globe will fuel the segment growth in the coming years.

The hair transplant market for drugs segment is predicted to witness 25.5% growth rate from 2020 to 2026. The enhancement in alopecia treatment is mainly driven by the growing demand for hair loss treatment drugs that have shown higher effectiveness along with minimal side effects. In addition, increasing investment made by the leading players to develop novel hair transplant drugs will further boost the market expansion.

Platelet rich plasma (PRP) therapy in the hair transplant market accounted for USD 358 million in 2019. PRP is considered as one of the innovative and technological advanced hair transplant therapies for the patients suffering from hair thinning. PRP contains more than 20 growth factors that are considered exceptional for hair regrowth by stimulating the new hair cells and hence, this procedure will showcase higher adoption than other therapies.

Hair transplant market from male patient segment is estimated to expand at 25.8% CAGR through 2026 owing

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Covid survivors deal with another lingering side effect: Dramatic hair loss

When Stacey Maravola’s hair started falling out in clumps two months after she tested positive for Covid-19, she was not initially concerned.

“I washed my hair one day and I’m pulling handfuls upon handfuls. And I’m like, ‘Maybe because it was up in a scrunchie,’” Maravola, 44, of Leetsdale, Pennsylvania, said.

But nearly two months later, the hair loss has not stopped. Each time Maravola, a health and lifestyle coach, shampoos her hair, fistfuls come out, getting tangled around her fingers and sticking to her legs as she showers.

“I’ve had to limit hair washes because I’m terrified,” she said. “I’m not a big emotional person, but I can tell you, this has changed me. I cry every single time I take a shower.”

Image: Stacey Maravola (Courtesy Stacey Maravola)
Image: Stacey Maravola (Courtesy Stacey Maravola)

Maravola is one of many coronavirus survivors dealing with dramatic hair loss, something that experts say is not entirely unexpected following a serious illness — but can be jarring nonetheless.

“It is upsetting, especially for those who have gone through a significant clinical course of Covid, to then experience this as well,” said Dr. Sara Hogan, a dermatologist and health sciences clinical instructor at the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles. “But oftentimes, patients, once they have a diagnosis and they understand that typically this will get better, they feel better.”

Sudden hair loss can happen after any stressful event, including major surgery or even an emotional stressor such as starting a new job, Hogan said. The pandemic appears to have led to a large uptick in people who are seeing their hair thinning, she said: Hogan used to see an average of three to five hair loss patients a week and now sees up to seven a day.

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Why severe assaults to the body or mind sometimes trigger hair loss is not entirely understood. In the majority of these cases, the patient is diagnosed with telogen effluvium, a temporary condition in which he or she sheds many more hairs than the typical 100 or so that people lose in a day. Telogen effluvium usually begins about three to six months after the stressor has happened, and in most patients, the problem will resolve within four to six months, according to Hogan. (In rare cases, unremitting stress can lead to chronic shedding, she added.)

Researchers do not believe Covid-19 attacks the hair follicles, meaning the hair loss is the body’s reaction to the physiological and emotional stress that the disease caused, rather than a symptom of the disease itself. And many hair loss patients that Hogan and other dermatologists are currently seeing have never had the coronavirus to begin with.

“It’s just all the other tolls of the pandemic that are leading to the hair loss,” such as financial worries or grieving the death of a family member, said Dr. Lauren Kole, an assistant professor of dermatology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine.

Hair loss following Covid-19

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The F.D.A. Wanted to Ban Some Hair Straighteners. It Never Happened.

Heat is crucial to the process: Directions call for applying the product to the hair, blow drying the hair with a hair dryer, and then using a flat iron heated to at least 380 degrees to straighten the hair. The concern is that heat converts the liquid formaldehyde into a gas and releases it into the air.

Reached by phone in early October, Monte Devin Semler, who is listed in California business records as the trustee of an entity that manages GIB LLC and who says on his LinkedIn profile that he is the owner and founder of Brazilian Blowout, hung up after being asked to comment. He did not respond to emails.

Another manufacturer, Van Tibolli Beauty PR, was told by the F.D.A. on Sept. 2, 2015, that its GK Hair Taming System products contained formaldehyde, and that labels warning consumers of possible health effects, including cancer, were required. F.D.A. officials said last week that the case had been resolved, but refused to provide further details. The company’s president, Van Tibolli, said in a phone interview that some of his company’s hair straightening products still contain methylene glycol, the liquid form of formaldehyde.

Products containing formaldehyde may soon be taken off the market in at least one state: Last month, Gov. Gavin Newsom of California signed the Toxic-Free Cosmetics Act into law. The law prohibits the use of a dozen chemicals in cosmetics, including formaldehyde, mercury, phthalates and parabens.

Salon workers experience the most exposure to the hair straightening products, according to the nonprofit group Women’s Voices for the Earth. Many hair dressers say they always assumed products that were on the market were safe.

“When I would try to speak up about this, my co-workers always said, ‘If it was that bad for you, it wouldn’t be legal,’” said Emily Baedeker, a hair dresser in Alameda, Calif., who got migraines when Brazilian Blowout was used around her. “The assumption is that there is an invisible safety net that protects us.”

Susan Beachy contributed research.

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