Over-45s at greater risk of STIs, new study finds

Middle-aged adults face a greater risk of catching sexually transmitted infections than ever before — because society is unwilling to talk about older people having sex, a new study has found.



a hand holding a baby on a bed: Social stigma was a key barrier to sexual health in the over-45s, researchers said.


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Social stigma was a key barrier to sexual health in the over-45s, researchers said.

Negative attitudes toward sexual health and limited knowledge of the needs of over-45s mean some older people are unaware of the dangers of unprotected sex, researchers from the UK, Belgium and the Netherlands have warned.

Experts associated with the SHIFT sexual health initiative surveyed 800 adults across the south coast of England and northern regions of Belgium and the Netherlands — with some 200 respondents identified as facing socioeconomic disadvantage.

Almost 80% of respondents in the general population group were aged between 45 and 65, while 58% of those considered socioeconomically disadvantaged were aged 45-54.

Researchers said “major changes” in sexual behavior in recent decades have seen rising numbers of sexually active older people — but many barely consider the possibility of STIs.

The most cited reason for not using contraception was that participants deemed themselves to be monogamous, exclusive to one relationship, experts said, followed by participants believing they were not at risk of pregnancy.

“Over-45s at most risk are generally those entering new relationships after a period of monogamy, often post-menopause, when pregnancy is no longer a consideration, but give little thought to STIs,” Ian Tyndall, senior lecturer at Britain’s University of Chichester, one of the project’s partner organizations, said in a statement.

Researchers found that more than 50% of respondents in both the general population and in the socioeconomically disadvantaged group had never been tested for a sexually transmitted infection.

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Stigma and shame were identified as the greatest barriers to adults accessing sexual healthcare services, with many participants indicating that they felt that sexual health was a “dirty” term, discouraging people from seeking regular health checks.

“A big barrier to people accessing services is societal stigma, and assumptions that older people are asexual and that sex is no longer part of their lives. This really limits the awareness of sexual health services among this group,” Tess Hartland, research assistant with the SHIFT project, told CNN.

A “significant number” of survey respondents were also unaware of the risks of sexually transmitted infections, researchers said, while 42% of general respondents in the UK and the Netherlands did not know where their nearest sexual health service was located.

“A lot of services and sexual health promotion is really tailored towards young people,” Hartland told CNN, noting that some people in the over-45 age category may have received limited sexual health education at school, affecting their attitudes today.

Participants also reported that their healthcare professionals, such as doctors and nurses, lacked appropriate sexual health knowledge.

“A lot of respondents preferred to go to their GP or their doctor rather than a specific sexual health service,” Hartland

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Telix Pharmaceuticals and China Grand Pharma Announce Strategic Licence and Commercial Partnership for Greater China Market

MELBOURNE, Australia and HONG KONG, Nov. 02, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Telix Pharmaceuticals Limited (ASX: TLX, ‘Telix’, the ‘Company’) announces it has entered into a strategic licence and commercial partnership with China Grand Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Holdings Limited (‘China Grand Pharma’) for Telix’s portfolio of Molecularly-Targeted Radiation (‘MTR’) products.

Telix has appointed China Grand Pharma as its exclusive partner for the Greater China market (‘Territory’)1 and grants China Grand Pharma exclusive development and commercialisation rights to Telix’s portfolio of prostate, renal and brain (glioblastoma) cancer imaging and therapeutic MTR products in the Territory.

Leveraging off China Grand Pharma’s capabilities and infrastructure in China, Telix will enter a significant oncology market, and by partnering with Telix, China Grand Pharma will build on its pipeline of innovative products for Greater China, as well as its strategy in Nuclear Medicine.

The material terms of the partnership include:

Therapeutic Products

  • US$25M (~AU$35M) up-front non-refundable prepayment to Telix, to be credited against future regulatory and commercial milestone payments.

  • Up to US$225M (~AU$315M) in regulatory and commercial milestone payments to Telix, across Telix’s existing therapeutic products portfolio.

  • Program-related investment estimated at up to US$65M (~AU$90M) for clinical costs associated with the development of the therapeutic products in the Territory, to align with Telix’s global clinical development programs.

  • Royalties on therapeutic product sales in the Territory, in addition to milestone payments.

Imaging Products

  • Exclusive commercial partnership (sales, marketing, distribution) for Telix’s core imaging product portfolio:

    • TLX250-CDx (89Zr-Girentuximab) for renal cancer, and;

    • TLX591-CDx (68Ga-PSMA), TLX599-CDx (99Tc-PSMA) for prostate cancer.

Strategic Equity Investment

Additionally, China Grand Pharma will make a simultaneous one-time strategic equity investment of US$25M (~AU$35M) in Telix. The investment is in the form of a private placement to China Grand Pharma of 20,947,181 fully paid ordinary Telix shares representing a post-issue holding by China Grand Pharma of 7.62%. Shares will be issued at a price of AU$1.69, based on the 10-day volume-weighted average price (‘VWAP’) for Telix shares up to and including 28th October 2020. Shares will be issued no later than November 06 2020, following receipt of the placement proceeds. Shares issued to China Grand Pharma are subject to a holding lock and will not be able to be traded for a period of 12 months from the date of issue. In addition, China Grand Pharma is subject to a standstill provision and is unable to trade in Telix shares for a period of 12 months.

Telix Pharmaceuticals CEO, Dr. Chris Behrenbruch stated, “Telix’s mission is to be a leading global oncology company and China is an important future market for our products. We are pleased to be working with China Grand Pharma to deliver our diagnostic imaging and therapeutic products to cancer patients in China. Considering the successful acquisition of Sirtex Medical Limited with joint venture private equity partner CDH Genetech Limited2 and subsequent approval of a New Drug Application filing for SIR-Spheres® by the National Medical Products Administration (‘NMPA’) of the

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Grocery workers at greater risk for COVID without symptoms

Grocery workers are likely at greater risk of infection with the new coronavirus, a new study shows.

Not only that, but because a high percentage of them have no symptoms when they are infected, they could become sources of future spread, the researchers said.

For the study, Harvard University T.H. Chan School of Public Health scientists studied the test results of workers at a single grocery store in Boston. One in five workers (20%) tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, and three-quarters of those with the virus had no symptoms.

These essential workers could be an important reservoir of infection, the investigators said. “Once essential workers are infected with SARS-CoV-2, they may become a significant transmission source for the community they serve,” the researchers explained.

The percentage of those infected was much higher than the virus’s prevalence in the local community, which was 0.9% to 1.3% at that time. The grocery workers who had customer-facing jobs were five times more likely to test positive, the findings showed.

The study was published this week in the journal Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The grocery workers had the coronavirus tests in May as part of a mandatory testing policy in Boston.

The workers also answered questions about symptoms and exposures, and completed detailed questionnaires about their lifestyles, medical and employment histories, working patterns, role at the store, commuting to and from work, and the protective measures they were able to take against infection at work. Most also answered questionnaires focusing on anxiety and depression.

The study was small and specific to the one location, the researchers cautioned.

“This is the first study to demonstrate the significant asymptomatic infection rate, exposure risks, and associated psychological distress of grocery retail essential workers during the pandemic,” Justin Yang and colleagues said in a journal news release.

About one in four of the 99 employees who completed the mental health questions reported feeling at least mild anxiety. About half of those respondents weren’t able to consistently practice social distancing at work. Those who were able to practice social distancing tended to be less anxious, according to the report.

Eight of the employees were mildly depressed. They were less likely to practice social distancing at work and relied on shared rides or public transportation. Those who drove their own car, walked or biked were far less likely to report depression.

“Our significant mental health finding calls for action in providing comprehensive employee assistance services to help essential workers cope with the psychological distress during the COVID-19 pandemic,” the study authors said.

The researchers also recommended that employers and government officials implement routine COVID-19 employee testing, and strategies to reduce contact.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has tips for preventing COVID-19 in the workplace.

Copyright 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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IU School of Medicine partnering to increase greater access to psychiatric care in Northwest Indiana | Local News



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Indiana University Northwest




MERRILLVILLE — A new partnership is seeking to bring greater access to psychiatric care in Northwest Indiana.

The IU School of Medicine in collaboration with the Northwest Indiana GME Consortium is launching a new psychiatry resident program at IU Northwest to train psychiatrists in a four-year program.

The program, accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, will accept four residents each year.


IUN to offer degree exploration, admissions advice in virtual open house

It is the first psychiatry residency program in northern Indiana and the third in the IU School of Medicine, IU School of Medicine Northwest — Gary campus director Elizabeth Ryan said in a news release.

“The program contributes to a goal of recruiting medical students to the Northwest-Gary campus, upon medical school graduation transitioning to a Northwest Indiana-located residency program and retaining these physicians to serve in the Region,” Ryan said.

The United States Health Resources and Services Administration has designated Northwest Indiana as a high-needs geographic health professional shortage area, according to an IU School of Medicine news release.


250% spike in NWI COVID cases, rising positivity rates indicate worst is yet to come, professor says

The program’s partners say they hope the new cohort can help ease this gap.

Residents in the new program will be integrated into the network of Northwest Indiana GME Consortium partners, like Regional Health Systems in Merrillville.

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Stanford Medicine launches home COVID-19 testing study covering greater San Francisco

Stanford University and its school of medicine have launched plans to survey the population of greater San Francisco for COVID-19, in an effort to build an early warning system for future outbreaks.

Using a combination of self-collection testing kits and online reporting, the Community Alliance to Test Coronavirus at Home, or CATCH Study, aims to estimate the true prevalence of the disease among the 8.5 million people living in the Bay Area.

Ultimately, the study hopes to scale up a diagnostic infrastructure that can provide fast remote testing to a broad and representative sample of the population, including among the underserved and vulnerable across 12 counties. 

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The program is currently seeking to enroll participants, who will report their exposures and symptoms daily through an online portal. 

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Home test kits—developed in collaboration with the Chan Zuckerberg Biohub, which is also helping to fund the study—will be delivered through the mail within 24 hours at no cost, and will contain a gentle nasal swab for self-collection. Samples will then be processed at Stanford’s laboratories.

“Our main objective is to learn where and how the virus is spreading—whether people are displaying symptoms or not—and which communities are most vulnerable,” said co-lead researcher Yvonne Maldonado, an associate professor of health research and policy at Stanford Medicine. 

“These insights will help our scientists and local public officials gain a deeper understanding of the distribution of COVID-19 throughout the greater San Francisco Bay Area so that they can stop its spread,” Maldonado said.

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Moms Who Lost Custody of Their Kids Due to Addiction Overcome Darkness to Find ‘Greater Things’

Moms Who Lost Custody of Their Kids Due to Addiction Overcome Darkness to Find ‘Greater Things’

“I learned that I was a person and I was not my disease and that it was okay my kids could not keep me sober,” says Freedom House alumna Christina Compton

Three years ago, Christina Compton was in an incredibly dark period of her life after struggling with addiction to the point where she lost custody of her two kids and was arrested while pregnant with her third child.

“I felt like there was no hope or no chance,” Compton, 33, tells PEOPLE. “I carried around so much guilt and shame from losing my other kids and I felt like they should’ve been enough to keep me sober, [but] it wasn’t. I never understood what was wrong with me and why I couldn’t stop doing drugs or alcohol.”

Elsewhere in Kentucky, mom Brittany Edwards was also struggling with her substance addiction and had lost custody of her four kids.

“Since I can remember, I’ve been a drug addict,” says Edwards, now 31. “It took me many, many years to realize I needed help.”

However, in the time since then, both Compton and Edwards have turned their lives around — thanks to the nonprofit organization Volunteers of America and their treatment center, The Freedom House, which helps pregnant women and moms stay with their kids while recovering.

Edwards was the Manchester Freedom House’s first graduate this past July, while Compton finished Louisville’s program in August 2017 and now works there as a therapist, technician, peer support specialist and intake specialist.

RELATED: Introducing PEOPLE’s Mental Health Initiative: Let’s Talk About It

Courtesy Christina Compton Christina Compton with her kids, Christina, CaRon and Wyatt

Volunteers of America Brittany Edwards with her kids Rylen, Ally, Jackson and Bentley

“Without them, I don’t know where I would have ended up,” Compton says of the facility. “You go into rehab saying, ‘Okay, I’m going to learn about my disease. I’m going to get sober,’ and Volunteers of America gave me so much more than that.”

Adds Edwards: “I’ve never completed anything in my life except for this program… Being an addict, it’s hard. No one is immune to addiction and they just taught me how to accept life on life’s terms and be okay with that.”

For Compton, her history with substance abuse began at age 9 after she suffered an injury from gymnastics and was given narcotic pain medication.

“I remember taking those and liking the way that they made me feel,” she recalls, adding that she “went off the deep end” after her mom died when Compton was in the eighth grade.

By 19, Compton was a mother of two but still using drugs and alcohol in what she says became “a vicious cycle” and caused her to lose custody of her kids.

“I just felt like this empty vessel of a woman and a failure,” she explains. “Because the one thing in my mind that

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Stanford Medicine Launches Study Of Greater San Francisco Bay Area Using Safe, Convenient COVID-19 Testing From Home

STANFORD, Calif., Oct. 20, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The Stanford University School of Medicine today announced the launch of the Community Alliance to Test Coronavirus at Home (CATCH) Study, an effort that seeks to estimate the true population prevalence of COVID-19 across the 8.5 million population of the greater San Francisco Bay Area, and ultimately aid in the effort to reopen schools, workplaces and communities.

The CATCH Study is now seeking participants. A key aim of the CATCH Study is to scale a simple, safe, convenient, and population-scale early diagnostic system to help stop further undetected spread of COVID-19. CATCH utilizes online surveys and home delivered self-collection kits that are able to be rapidly deployed to carry out remote testing in a broad and representative sample of the population, including those underserved and vulnerable populations that might otherwise not be reached or tested. The study is enabled by the Vera Cloud Testing Platform including its novel Vera Home Test Kit, a gentle nasal swab self-collection kit that can be delivered directly to the homes of study participants by existing couriers and package delivery services.

There is no cost to CATCH Study participation, and all residents in the San Francisco Bay Area are welcome to enroll. Every participant joins online, reports their symptoms and exposures to COVID-19 daily, and may also be offered a home test kit at no cost upon reporting. If accepted, within 24 hours a home test kit will be delivered safely and conveniently by express courier to their home, where they can self-collect a sample, which is then delivered to the Stanford Health Care laboratory and tested for SARS-CoV-2 infection. All tested participants are informed of their results privately and securely online via their personal password-protected account within the CATCH website. The unique approach removes any requirement to leave home or shelter-in-place. 

The study is being led by Stanford Medicine researchers Yvonne Maldonado, MD, professor of pediatric infectious diseases and of health research and policy, Lorene Nelson, MD, associate professor of health research and policy, as well as Dr. Stephen Quake, professor of bioengineering and of applied physics and co-president of the Chan Zuckerberg Biohub.

“We encourage as many Bay Area residents as possible to sign-up for the CATCH Study to help increase our knowledge of a virus that has had significant impacts on our communities,” said Dr. Maldonado. “Our main objective is to learn where and how the virus is spreading — whether people are displaying symptoms or not — and which communities are most vulnerable. These insights will help our scientists and local public officials gain a deeper understanding of the distribution of COVID-19 throughout the greater San Francisco Bay Area so that they can stop its spread.”

With the effects of COVID-19 disproportionately affecting minority and vulnerable communities throughout the country, and specifically in the Bay Area, one of the key intentions of the study is to address inequities in testing by researching underserved populations. The testing kits will provide

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ImmunoGen and Huadong Medicine Announce Strategic Collaboration to Develop and Commercialize Mirvetuximab Soravtansine in Greater China

Partnership Accelerates Development Path for Mirvetuximab in Greater China and Expands Huadong Medicine’s Oncology Portfolio with Innovative ADC

Combines ImmunoGen’s Lead Clinical Program with Huadong’s Regional Oncology Expertise

ImmunoGen to Receive $40 Million Upfront Payment and is Eligible to Receive Up to $265 Million in Potential Development, Regulatory, and Commercial Milestone Payments

ImmunoGen, Inc. (Nasdaq: IMGN), a leader in the expanding field of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) for the treatment of cancer, and Hangzhou Zhongmei Huadong Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., a wholly-owned subsidiary of Huadong Medicine Co., Ltd., today announced that the companies have entered into an exclusive collaboration to develop and commercialize mirvetuximab soravtansine in mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau, and Taiwan (Greater China). ImmunoGen will retain all rights to mirvetuximab in the rest of the world.

This collaboration provides ImmunoGen with access to the second largest pharmaceutical market in the world via Huadong Medicine’s development, regulatory, and commercial capabilities, while supporting Huadong Medicine’s growth strategy to build a deep portfolio of oncology, endocrinology, and autoimmunology candidates. Mirvetuximab adds a compelling late-stage oncology asset to Huadong Medicine’s portfolio.

“With extensive regional experience, the right development and regulatory capabilities, and access to a deep local network of hospitals and clinics across Greater China, Huadong Medicine is an ideal partner for us,” said Mark Enyedy, ImmunoGen’s President and Chief Executive Officer. “This collaboration reflects mirvetuximab’s potential to deliver meaningful value to ovarian cancer patients as well as our ability to translate our work in ADCs into long-term relationships that create sustainable value for ImmunoGen and our partners. We look forward to working closely with Huadong Medicine to develop and commercialize mirvetuximab in Greater China as we advance the mirvetuximab program and prepare for the first potential commercial launch in the United States in 2022.”

“ImmunoGen is a leader in the development of ADCs for the treatment of cancer and this partnership provides us with a late-stage asset that will enable us to further expand our pipeline of innovative oncology programs,” said Liang Lu, Chairman of Huadong Medicine. “The compelling clinical data generated to date highlights mirvetuximab’s potential to be a promising therapy for an extremely difficult to treat disease and we look forward to beginning its development as we seek to meet the growing needs of ovarian cancer patients in Greater China.”

Under the terms of the agreement, ImmunoGen will receive an upfront payment of $40 million and is eligible to receive additional milestone payments of up to $265 million as certain development, regulatory, and commercial objectives are achieved. ImmunoGen is also eligible to receive low double digit to high teen royalties as a percentage of mirvetuximab commercial sales by Huadong Medicine in Greater China.

Huadong Medicine will be responsible for the development as well as potential regulatory submissions and commercialization of mirvetuximab in Greater China pursuant to input from a joint steering committee comprised of individuals from both companies. Huadong Medicine will also have the opportunity to participate in global clinical studies of mirvetuximab conducted by ImmunoGen. ImmunoGen will continue

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