Dentist’s Therapy Dog Is So Proud When He Does A Good Job

At a Zanesville, Ohio, dental practice, one member of the staff makes people actually look forward to their appointments. 

A few days a week, a 1-year-old Labradoodle named Dwight goes to work with his mom, a dental hygenist, at Sulens Dental Studio. The mild-tempered pup greets anxious patients and helps take their mind off their fears. 

Dwight the therapy dog comforts a patient
Jensen McVey

Dwight began his training as a therapy dog at 12 weeks old and continues to practice with trainers twice a week at his puppy school and the dental office. But from the moment his mom brought him home, she knew he’d be perfect for the job.

“Dwight was definitely born to be a therapy dog,” Jensen McVey, Dwight’s trainer, told The Dodo. “He is extremely sweet and has never met a stranger!”

Therapy dog helps out at dentist's office
Jensen McVey

“Dwight can definitely get excited and play when the time calls for it but otherwise he is a calm cuddle bug,” he added. “Dwight is so much fun to work with and every one of my employees loves working with him and loves seeing him come in.”

Jensen McVey

According to one study, as many as 36 percent of people suffer from dental fear. But Dwight is doing everything he can to help change people’s perception of sitting in the dentist’s chair. Therapy dogs can positively change people’s mood and anxiety — even reducing their perception of pain.

Dwight’s job starts as soon as the patient walks in. He runs to greet them at the door with a big smile and a wagging tail. If the patient needs a little extra help, Dwight is happy to comfort them during their cleaning or procedure.

Jensen McVey

“He helps to create a fun experience for scared children coming in and provides overall comfort for those in the office,” McVey said. “He is also trained to gently lay and apply pressure for nervous patients or to gently place his paws up so people can pet him and take their mind off of being at the dentist.”

Jensen McVey

For all his hard work, Dwight gets paid in treats and a monthly BarkBox. But the pup is happiest when he can spend time with his dental family — helping people feel a little bit better every day.

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‘Dentist Dog’ Is So Proud When He Does A Good Job



a dog wearing a costume



At a Zanesville, Ohio, dental practice, one member of the staff makes people actually look forward to their appointments. 

A few days a week, a 1-year-old Labradoodle named Dwight goes to work with his mom, a dental hygenist, at Sulens Dental Studio. The mild-tempered pup greets anxious patients and helps take their mind off their fears. 


a dog holding a stuffed animal


© Jensen McVey



Dwight began his training as a therapy dog at 12 weeks old and continues to practice with trainers twice a week at his puppy school and the dental office. But from the moment his mom brought him home, she knew he’d be perfect for the job.

“Dwight was definitely born to be a therapy dog,” Jensen McVey, Dwight’s trainer, told The Dodo. “He is extremely sweet and has never met a stranger!”




© Jensen McVey



“Dwight can definitely get excited and play when the time calls for it but otherwise he is a calm cuddle bug,” he added. “Dwight is so much fun to work with and every one of my employees loves working with him and loves seeing him come in.”


a person holding a dog


© Jensen McVey



According to one study, as many as 36 percent of people suffer from dental fear. But Dwight is doing everything he can to help change people’s perception of sitting in the dentist’s chair. Therapy dogs can positively change people’s mood and anxiety — even reducing their perception of pain.

Dwight’s job starts as soon as the patient walks in. He runs to greet them at the door with a big smile and a wagging tail. If the patient needs a little extra help, Dwight is happy to comfort them during their cleaning or procedure.


a person holding a dog


© Jensen McVey



“He helps to create a fun experience for scared children coming in and provides overall comfort for those in the office,” McVey said. “He is also trained to gently lay and apply pressure for nervous patients or to gently place his paws up so people can pet him and take their mind off of being at the dentist.”


a dog sitting on a table


© Jensen McVey



For all his hard work, Dwight gets paid in treats and a monthly BarkBox. But the pup is happiest when he can spend time with his dental family — helping people feel a little bit better every day.

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Good Sleep Habits Tied to Lower Risk of Heart Failure

A combination of healthy sleep habits may help reduce the risk for heart failure, new research suggests.

Scientists studied 408,802 generally healthy people aged 27 to 73 between 2006 and 2010, collecting information on their sleep habits. Each person got a zero-to-five “healthy sleep score,” based on five healthy sleep practices: being a “morning person”; sleeping seven to eight hours a night; rarely or never snoring; rarely having insomnia; and rarely being excessively sleepy during the day.

Over an average follow-up of 10 years, there were 5,221 cases of heart failure. Compared with people who scored zero or one, those who scored two had a 15 percent reduced risk for heart failure; those who scored three had a 28 percent reduced risk; and those who scored four a 38 percent risk reduction. Those who scored a perfect five had a 42 percent lower risk of heart failure compared with those who scored zero or one.

The study, in the journal Circulation, controlled for smoking, alcohol intake, physical activity, diabetes, hypertension and other variables. It is an observational study, however, so it does not prove causality.

“We should consider all of these sleep behaviors together rather than treating them as separate phenomena,” said the senior author Dr. Lu Qi, a professor of epidemiology at Tulane University. “People regulate their sleep as a whole, not as separate events.”

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‘Hidden’ Prostate Cancer on Biopsy Usually Means Good Outcome: Study | Health News

By Robert Preidt, HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

MONDAY, Nov. 23, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Negative biopsies among early-stage prostate cancer patients who’ve chosen active surveillance are associated with a low risk of disease progression, but they aren’t a sign that their cancer has completely vanished, a new study indicates.

Active surveillance refers to close monitoring for signs of cancer progression — what’s often called “watchful waiting.” Patients sometimes get regular prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing, prostate exams, imaging and repeat biopsies.

The objective of active surveillance is to avoid or delay treatment and its side effects without putting patients at risk of cancer progression and death.

Sometimes, active surveillance patients have negative biopsies that show no evidence of prostate cancer. While some of these patients may believe that their cancer has “vanished,” they most likely have low-volume or limited, hidden areas of prostate cancer that weren’t detected in the biopsy sample, according to the authors of the study published recently in The Journal of Urology.

“While a negative biopsy is good news, the long-term implications associated with such ‘hidden’ cancers remain unclear,” said study author Dr. Carissa Chu, from the University of California, San Francisco.

For the study, Chu and colleagues analyzed data from 514 men undergoing active surveillance for early-stage prostate cancer between 2000 and 2019. All of them had at least three surveillance biopsies after their initial prostate cancer diagnosis. Median follow-up time was nearly 10 years.

Of those patients, 37% had at least one negative biopsy, including 15% with consecutive negative biopsies, according to the report.

Men with negative biopsies had more favorable disease characteristics, including low PSA density and fewer samples with cancer at the initial prostate biopsy. Negative biopsies were also associated with good long-term outcomes, the researchers said.

After 10 years, rates of survival with no need for prostate cancer treatment (such as surgery or radiation) were 84% for men with consecutive negative biopsies, 74% for those with one negative biopsy and 66% for those with no negative biopsies.

After adjusting for other factors, the researchers concluded that men with one or more negative biopsies were much less likely to have cancer detected on a later biopsy.

“For men undergoing active surveillance, negative biopsies indicate low-volume disease and lower rates of disease progression,” Chu said in a journal news release. “These ‘hidden’ cancers have excellent long-term outcomes and remain ideal for continued active surveillance.”

SOURCE: The Journal of Urology, news release, Nov. 17, 2020

Copyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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Masks Good, Ventilation Better at Cutting COVID Risk at Indoor Events: Study | Top News

BERLIN (Reuters) – Face masks and limits on numbers are important, but good ventilation technology is the most essential ingredient of all in reducing the risk of the coronavirus spreading at public events indoors, according to a German study.

And researchers say the study’s results have implications for containing the epidemic among the broader population too.

Around 1,500 volunteers with face masks, hand sanitiser and proximity trackers attended an indoor pop-concert in Leipzig in August to assess how the virus spreads in large gatherings.

Reseachers simulated three scenarios with varying numbers of spectators and social-distancing standards, and created a computer model of the arena to analyse the flow of aerosols from infected virtual spectators.

“The most important finding for us was understanding how crucial it is to have good ventilation technology. This is key to lowering the risk of infection,” said Stefan Moritz, leader of the RESTART-19 study at the University Medical School in Halle.

The study also found that reducing venue capacity, having multiple arena entrances and seating spectators can have a major impact on the number of contacts people accumulate.

Its recommendations include only allowing food to be eaten at seats, open-air waiting areas, mask-wearing for the concert’s duration and employing stewards to make sure people stick to hygiene rules.

Researchers also developed an epidemiological model to analyse the impact of staging an event on the spread of the virus among the broader population.

They found hygiene measures such as mask-wearing and social-distancing should remain in place as long as the pandemic persists, while seating plans and number of guests should be adjusted based on the incidence of the virus.

“Events have the potential to fuel the epidemic by spreading pathogens, but if a hygiene concept is stuck to then the risk is very low,” said Rafael Mikolajczyk, from Halle University’s Institute for Medical Epidemiology.

The study’s results have not yet been peer-reviewed.

(Reporting by Caroline Copley; editing by John Stonestreet)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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Protect Good Medicine, Stop the Censorship of Good Counseling

An increasing number of children, both here in America and around the globe, are experiencing deep discomfort, confusion, and alienation from their sexed body, a condition known as gender dysphoria. Unsurprisingly, people disagree about how best to respond to this condition in order to help these kids. How we navigate that disagreement will prove critical.

Some people insist that the proper course of action involves experimental interventions directed at the boy or girl’s body itself—puberty-blocking drugs, cross-sex hormones, and surgery. Others suggest that therapy be directed to the child’s thoughts and feelings, not the body.

Physical interventions on minors to “affirm” a mistaken “gender identity” violate sound medical ethics and should be prohibited. And yet, in all fifty states, such interventions are entirely legal.

At the same time, a more radical movement is seeking to make it illegal to use a psychological approach to help these children rather than a hormonal and surgical one. An increasing number of jurisdictions—both in the US and in other countries—are banning therapy that aims to help minors with gender dysphoria feel comfortable about their own bodies without transforming their bodies. Federal legislation has been introduced that would create nationwide censorship of such therapy, and the UN has claimed that such therapy violates human rights.

This turns medical ethics—and the law—upside down. Good therapy should never be prohibited. Children deserve access to the therapeutic assistance they need to feel comfortable being what they are as a plain and ineradicable matter of biological fact: male or female. And parents have a natural right to seek this care for their children.

What’s Wrong with Therapy Bans

Some argue that any attempt to help children feel comfortable and thrive as the sex they are, without transforming their bodies, is not good medicine, and they accuse practitioners of using abusive, harmful techniques. But they never provide credible evidence, and the therapy bans they support don’t target harmful practices. Instead, they prohibit working toward goals and outcomes that sexual progressive activists oppose. That is, these therapy bans aren’t focused on techniques that cause harm, but on certain objectives being sought—namely, being comfortable with one’s body.

As a result, one-on-one counseling to help a teen struggling with body image due to anorexia would be permitted, but the very same counseling would be prohibited if the goal is to help a teen struggling with body image due to gender dysphoria.

Activists use emotionally charged language, labelling all such techniques “conversion therapy.” They do not apply this label only to certain discredited techniques (such as electro-shock therapies), but to any therapeutic service—including basic talk therapy—to help a gender dysphoric youth feel comfortable without “transitioning.” Their argument is that if the true “gender identity” of the child is not being “affirmed,” then the child is being harmed. They claim that if a boy who “identifies” as a girl is helped to be comfortable with his actual and unalterable bodily sex, then “conversion therapy” is taking place—regardless of the counseling techniques deployed.

What

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Bilingualism is good medicine for the brain

Shortly after Kathy Jones relocated to California, the retired professor decided she needed to learn to speak Spanish.



Staying Well Bilingual Brain for Wellness_00000020.jpg


© Provided by CNN
Staying Well Bilingual Brain for Wellness_00000020.jpg

“When I moved to San Diego, I would see all these young kids, mostly Latino kids, who could speak perfect Spanish and perfect English. And switch, back and forth, with fluidity. And I saw that and I don’t know why, but I said to myself, I want to be able to do that,” she says.

Jones looked forward to her weekly Spanish class, but what she really loved was the extracurricular activities organized by her teachers at the Culture and Language Center in San Diego.

“Before the pandemic, we had meet-ups for coffee, parties, craft workshops and excursions all over Latin America — all totally in Spanish. We haven’t been able to do any of that since March.”

Jones is still keeping up with her classes, but they’re all online now. Her classmate is a friend who lives in Vancouver, British Columbia, and their teacher is based in Tijuana. Her online sessions are providing some much-needed social interaction while Jones and her husband hunker down in their San Diego home.

The benefits

Since Jones has been such a dedicated pupil, she’s almost reached fluency. And that could be good for her brain.

Some of the most compelling research on bilingualism and aging comes from Ellen Bialystok of York University in Toronto.

She found that bilinguals are diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease four to five years later than their monolingual counterparts.

“The more you use another language, the better you get at it. Well, that’s not surprising, but along with that, the more you use two languages, the more your brain subtly rewires,” she says.

And when it comes to the beneficial effects bilingualism has on the brain, education levels do not matter. In fact, the most profound effects were found in people who were illiterate and had no education. Bilingualism was their only real source of mental stimulation, and as they got older, it provided protection for their aging brains.

Tamar Gollan of the University of California San Diego Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center explains it this way: “Bilingualism doesn’t prevent you from getting Alzheimer’s disease; it doesn’t prevent brain damage from happening if you have the disease. What it does is it makes you continue to function, even in the face of having damage to the brain. You can imagine an athlete with an injury crossing the finish line, even though they’re injured.”

So why does being bilingual have any effect at all?

“The effect it has is, I believe, is on the attention system,” Bialystok says. “This is what cognition is, knowing what you need to attend to, and blocking out the rest.”

Brain changes

Bialystok believes the experience of using two languages effectively reorganizes your brain.

“So that means the more experience with bilingualism leads to greater changes. The longer you’re bilingual, the more the changes. The earlier you start

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Bilingualism is good medicine for the brain | Live Well

“The effect it has is, I believe, is on the attention system,” Bialystok says. “This is what cognition is, knowing what you need to attend to, and blocking out the rest.”

Brain changes

Bialystok believes the experience of using two languages effectively reorganizes your brain.

“So that means the more experience with bilingualism leads to greater changes. The longer you’re bilingual, the more the changes. The earlier you start being bilingual, the more the changes. The more intense your bilingual experience is on a daily basis, the more the changes.”

“When you’re bilingual,” Gollan explains, “you can’t turn one language off, so you’re constantly having to face choices that monolingual speakers don’t have to make. So in addition, you have to ‘work hard’ to be bilingual.”

People who are highly educated, or people who have very demanding jobs, might have similar benefits with later onset of Alzheimer’s disease. They still get the disease, but all that hard work their brains did over the years makes it more resilient, for longer.

Use it or Lose it

Research is ongoing when it comes to bilingualism and the brain, and more benefits could still be found.

But in the meantime, what’s an older person to do? Is it too late to reap the benefits of learning a second language?

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Bilingualism is good medicine for the brain | Health

“The effect it has is, I believe, is on the attention system,” Bialystok says. “This is what cognition is, knowing what you need to attend to, and blocking out the rest.”

Brain changes

Bialystok believes the experience of using two languages effectively reorganizes your brain.

“So that means the more experience with bilingualism leads to greater changes. The longer you’re bilingual, the more the changes. The earlier you start being bilingual, the more the changes. The more intense your bilingual experience is on a daily basis, the more the changes.”

“When you’re bilingual,” Gollan explains, “you can’t turn one language off, so you’re constantly having to face choices that monolingual speakers don’t have to make. So in addition, you have to ‘work hard’ to be bilingual.”

People who are highly educated, or people who have very demanding jobs, might have similar benefits with later onset of Alzheimer’s disease. They still get the disease, but all that hard work their brains did over the years makes it more resilient, for longer.

Use it or Lose it

Research is ongoing when it comes to bilingualism and the brain, and more benefits could still be found.

But in the meantime, what’s an older person to do? Is it too late to reap the benefits of learning a second language?

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Why now is a good time to clean out old drugs from your medicine cabinet

Saturday is National Prescription Drug Take Back Day. Here are some tips on how to clean out your medicine cabinet.

Saturday is National Prescription Drug Take Back Day.

“The motto that we have is keep them safe, clean them out and take them back,” Marla Zometsky, of the Fairfax-Falls Church Community Services Board, said.

“Most of the prescription drugs that are misused, actually come from family and friends. You could be a drug dealer without even knowing it.”

After smoking pot, the second most common form of drug abuse in America is non-medical use of prescription drugs. Hence, National Prescription Drug Take Back Day.

Items not to bring to drop-off locations include illegal drugs, inhalers and liquids in large quantities. Welcomed items include prescription and non-prescription pills, electronic cigarettes and vaping products and their devices with batteries removed, and drugs for pets.

“Sometimes people will just throw their unused medications in the toilet, and we really don’t want you to do that because it contaminates the water supply,” Zometsky said. “It’s important to dispose of them safely and properly, so it helps everyone. It helps us maintain our safety in terms of drug misuse and abuse, and it helps our environment.”

Permanent lock boxes for old medications are in place regionwide at some police stations, hospitals and drug stores.

You can find lock box locations and participating Drug Take Back Day sites by zip code on the Drug Enforcement Administration website.

“It’s a great opportunity to clean out your medication cabinet, but also to do it in a safe way,” Zometsky said.

If you miss the day or can’t make it to a permanent lock box location, Zometsky’s advice:

  • Do not crush tablets or capsules.
  • Mix medications with items such as kitty litter, a soiled diaper or used coffee grounds.
  • Before putting the mix in the trash, seal it inside something such as a plastic bag.
  • Remove or scratch out all the personal information on the prescription label.

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