Outbreak Fueled By Small Get-Togethers, Puts LA In Tough Spot

LOS ANGELES, CA — At least a third of the people recently infected with the coronavirus in Los Angeles admitted to attending small get togethers while about 10 percent admitted to attending larger gatherings, according to ongoing USC study. More than half of those recently infected reported being close contact with people outside their household.

The study also found that roughly one-third of recently infected respondents reported visiting another person’s home in the previous seven days, while one- third said they had visitors at their own home. About 10% said they had attended a gathering of 10 or more people in the past week.

The study is among the mounting evidence that the outbreak is on the rise again in large part because of small gatherings and parties in defiance of health orders. The damage such gatherings can do during the pandemic is staggering.

“I know this sounds like a small number, but if 10% of L.A. residents attend gatherings, this translates to 1 million people gathering with others not in their household,”Los Angeles County’s Public Health Director Barbara Ferrer said. “And if we assume that 2% of people can be infected, we could possibly have 20,000 people capable of infecting others who are milling about at these gatherings each week.”

The findings should serve as a warning that the virus can as easily spread among friends and family as it can among strangers in public places. Los Angeles County’s public health director warned Monday of an already worsening COVID-19 situation becoming even more dire during the upcoming holiday season without rapid behavioral changes.

Patients who have become infected with the coronavirus show steady increases in interactions with people outside their own households,Barbara Ferrer said . The ongoing USC study found that for the week ending Oct. 20, 57% of survey respondents reported being in close contact with someone they don’t live with in the previous seven days.

Ferrer said the USC data, combined with information collected during contact-tracing interviews with virus patients, shows “there’s ample evidence that gatherings are increasing and are one of the drivers of the increases in cases in L.A. County.”

And with Thanksgiving just weeks away, Ferrer said concern is mounting that the holidays could make things worse.

“With our case numbers already on the rise, we are concerned about the upcoming months,” Ferrer said. “Holiday gatherings and cooler weather, when people are more likely to gather indoors, are perfect conditions for spreading COVID-19.”

Ferrer announced another 1,406 coronavirus cases on Monday — a day that is typically marked by relatively low daily case numbers due to reporting lags from the weekend. She noted that the county has reported almost 3,000 new cases over the last two days, a time of week when numbers are always lower than the rest of the week.

“So if that trend holds true, then we’re going to see higher numbers for the rest of this week,” she said. “And that would in fact not only create a

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How Modern Medicine Has Been Fueled by Racism

There’s a dark side to medicine that involves the literal use of Black people.

Medical advances save lives and improve quality of life, but many of them have come at a high cost. There’s a dark side to medical advances — one that includes the literal use of Black people.

This dark history has reduced Black people to test subjects: bodies void of humanity.

Not only has racism fueled many modern medical advances, it continues to play a role in preventing Black people from seeking and receiving appropriate medical attention.

J. Marion Sims, credited for the invention of the vaginal speculum and repair of vesico-vaginal fistula, is referred to as the “father of gynecology.”

Starting in 1845, Sims experimented on Black women who were enslaved, performing surgical techniques without the use of anesthesia.

The women, considered the property of enslavers, were not permitted to give consent. Further, it was believed that Black people did not feel pain, and this myth continues to restrict Black people’s access to proper medical treatment.

The names of the Black women we know of who endured torturous experimentation at the hands of Sims are Lucy, Anarcha, and Betsey. They were taken to Sims by enslavers who were focused on increasing their production yields.

This included the reproduction of enslaved people.

Anarcha was 17 years old and had gone through a difficult 3-day labor and stillbirth. After 30 surgeries with nothing but opium to ease her pain, Sims perfected his gynecological technique.

Anarcha Speaks: A History in Poems,” a poetry collection by Denver poet Dominique Christina, speaks from the perspectives of both Anarcha and Sims.

An etymologist, Christina was researching the origin of “anarchy” and came across Anarcha’s name with an asterisk.

Upon further research, Christina found that Anarcha was used in terrible experiments to aid in Sims’ scientific discoveries. While statues honor his legacy, Anarcha is a footnote.

“No Magic, No How” — Dominique Christina

right there

right there

when Massa-Doctor look

right past the

way i hurt

to say

she a tough ole gal,

can take a mighty lickin’

Healthline

The Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male, commonly referred to as The Tuskegee Syphilis Study, is a fairly well-known experiment conducted by the United States Public Health Service over a 40-year period starting in 1932.

It involved about 600 Black men from Alabama who were between ages 25 and 60 and experiencing poverty.

The study included 400 Black men with untreated syphilis and around 200 who didn’t have the disease to act as a control group.

They were all told they were being treated for “bad blood” for 6 months. The study involved X-rays, blood tests, and painful spinal taps.

When participation waned, the researchers started providing transportation and hot meals, exploiting the participants’ lack of resources.

In 1947, penicillin was shown to be effective in the treatment of syphilis, but it wasn’t administered to the men in the study. Instead, researchers were studying the progression of syphilis, allowing

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