Recover, Restore and Re-open: A Stanford Medicine framework for bouncing back from pandemic | News Center

Last spring, as office buildings emptied and local governments ordered residents to shelter in place, Stanford Medicine faculty members and executives sprang into action to understand more about the mysterious new coronavirus.

Even in the early months of the pandemic, it was clear that a return to normal — bringing students back to classrooms, workers back to offices and travelers back to airlines — would take complex and scientifically grounded policies and guidance.

Now, Stanford Medicine has launched a website to advise various segments of society on getting back to healthy functioning. The effort is called Recover, Restore and Re-open, or R3.

“Our experts’ immediate and steadfast response to the pandemic has built a valuable resource that we feel is imperative to share with the broader community,” said Priya Singh, chief strategy officer and senior associate dean for strategy and communications at Stanford Medicine. “We see the R3 framework as a collection of resources that community members — whether you’re from academia, industry or government, or you’re an individual — can use to inform and guide how they adapt to the uncertainties wrought by COVID-19.”

At the onset of the pandemic, experts from the School of Medicine, Stanford Health Care, Stanford Children’s Health, University HealthCare Alliance and Stanford University began building a framework for broad-based recovery. The group considered the needs of the community, such as developing a strategy for expanded coronavirus testing and building a public health surveillance system to track new cases, and used lessons learned from Stanford’s hospitals to inform preparedness for future inevitabilities, such as a surge in cases and a lack of personal protective equipment.

The R3 framework, which was commissioned by Lloyd Minor, MD, dean of the School of Medicine; David Entwistle, president and CEO of Stanford Health Care; and Paul King, president and CEO of Stanford Children’s Health, is powered by more than a dozen Stanford Medicine faculty and leaders. Along with Singh, Bob Harrington, MD, professor and chair of medicine; Mary Leonard, MD, MSCE, professor and chair of pediatrics; and Catherine Krna, MBA, president and CEO of the University HealthCare Alliance, led the R3 committee. Based on the committee’s expertise, the framework is a culmination of the lessons learned while delivering patient care, conducting research and forming policy recommendations as the pandemic evolved.

“Our success in responding so quickly at the beginning of the pandemic was, in part, due to the alignment between the School of Medicine and the clinical enterprises, Stanford Health Care and Stanford Children’s Health,” Krna said. “We would not have been as successful if it weren’t for the joint accountability of our faculty and clinicians and the staff who work with them to care for our patients.”

Guiding current and future response

The R3 framework is a guide to making policy, conducting research and developing treatments, among other things. It’s both a resource for helping communities deal with the pandemic and recover from it. For example, it offers recommendations for protecting vulnerable populations from the virus and safely

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DentaQuest Partnership and 120 Industry Leaders Create New Framework For More Sustainable Oral Health System

Three Domain Framework is the future of dentistry

Boston, Oct. 26, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Even as the COVID-19 pandemic exacerbates the nation’s broken oral health care system, it has created an opportunity for the industry to move toward a new, more sustainable model centered around the patient, primary care and prevention. The DentaQuest Partnership for Oral Health Advancement released a report today — based on the work of the Community Oral Health Transformation Initiative learning community — that establishes a primary care-like structure for oral health care delivery, facilitates value-based payment models and enables patients to invest in their own oral health.

120 of the industry’s most prominent organizations and leaders contributed to the development of the Three Domain Framework, which lays out a clear path for providers and practices to expand access to care, improve health outcomes and reduce the cost burdens associated with poor quality of life due to oral disease.

The framework gives patients and dental and medical providers the freedom to collaborate on treatment plans that work best for a given situation within the context of overall health. And it emphasizes patient and provider safety while addressing critical gaps in both patients’ access to care and providers’ financial viability.  

“Oral health is directly linked to overall health, but our current system doesn’t reflect that reality,” said Dr. Sean Boynes, vice president of health improvement for the DentaQuest Partnership for Oral Health Advancement. “And COVID-19 has shined a bright spotlight on this flaw. The Three Domain Framework outlines a new approach for oral health — one that focuses on prevention and healthy outcomes, facilitates value-based payment models, and will help address deep disparities in care and access. We are grateful to the many contributors who are working together to put our oral health system on a new and better path. This is the future of dentistry.”

The three domains can be adopted in any order, meaning the care team can determine where to begin. Providers can safely begin shifting their models of dentistry by starting in a domain that supports their unique needs and those of their patients. 

Domain One: Advancements in Teledentistry

The pandemic has increased interest in and utilization of teledentistry, but widespread adoption requires defining new treatment codes and rethinking the flow of care for a variety of dental visits. Domain One focuses on the identification, development and adoption of telehealth strategies and builds an accessible evidence-based virtual delivery approach specific to oral health that can enhance disease prevention and whole-person health.

Domain Two: Prioritization of Minimally Invasive Care

The pandemic also sparked interest in Minimally Invasive Care (MIC), as providers sought treatment methods, like sealants and silver diamine fluoride, that limit aerosols and the spread of COVID-19. MIC can reverse or slow early disease stages using a program of anticipatory guidance and collaborative decision-making with patients. Domain Two prioritizes the use of MIC for oral health management and maintenance.

Domain Three: Integration and Personalization of Oral Care Delivery

Domain Three

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