How to Reap the Benefits of Food as Medicine

Development & Aid, Featured, Food & Agriculture, Food Security and Nutrition, Food Sustainability, Global, Headlines, Health, Humanitarian Emergencies, Inequity, TerraViva United Nations

Sorghum is has nutritional and health benefits. Small scale farmer, Catherine Sibanda examines her sorghum crop in field, in Jambezi District, Zimbabwe, March 2015. Credit: Busani Bafana / IPS

BULAWAYO, Dec 2 2020 (IPS) – COVID-19 has magnified global food insecurity and is driving unhealthy eating and worsening malnutrition, food experts say. They have called for deliberate global investment in food as medicine on the back of growing diet-related illnesses.

Famed Greek physician, Hippocrates, foretold the future of food. He is attributed to have said: ‘Let food be thy medicine and let medicine be thy food’. COVID-19 has pushed the conversation about food as medicine onto the world agenda as more people are paying attention to their health and increasingly what they eat.

“COVID 19 has exposed American population to infectious diseases, and it has started off the conversation around food is medicine and how we need to reset our food system to create higher quality and more nutrient-dense food,” physician and author, Mark Hyman, told a plenary session at the virtual ‘Resetting the Food System from Farm to Fork’ dialogue co-hosted by the Barilla Centre for Food and Nutrition (BCFN) and Food Tank.

Hyman said a rejigged food system which creates better health for the population was a good strategy for pandemic resistance. He said food as medicine is part of medical care because it works better and faster and cheaper than most drugs and is probably the most effective treatment we have for most chronic illnesses.

“Science is clear that more nutrient density and food quality plays a huge role in human health and the protector foods, foods that protect you against disease and have medicinal properties,” said Hyman. He proposed the eating of more inexpensive, plant-based foods. “We need to rethink farming and introduce more nutrient-dense foods.”

Early this year, the United Nations warned that the pandemic would escalate a global food crisis – the worst in 50 years. The international body said the pandemic would make nutrition beyond the reach of many.

“Our food systems are failing, and the COVID-19 pandemic is making things worse,” UN Secretary-General, Antonio Guterres, warned, proposing three action plan to bolster a failing food system.

Guterres said countries should designate food and nutrition services as essential while implementing protections for those who work in the sector, prioritise food supply chains and strengthen social protection for young children, pregnant and breastfeeding women, older people and other at-risk groups. He also advocated the transformation of food systems for a more inclusive and sustainable world.

More than 820 million people in the world do not have enough to eat even though there is plenty of food to feed everyone. Globally, some 144 million children under five years are stunted as a result of malnutrition.

The UN has warned that nearly 690 million people, or 8.9 percent of the world’s population, were undernourished

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Philip Sharp: Senior with cancer chooses between medicine and food – Entertainment – Austin American-Statesman

Philip Sharp is battling a case of the sniffles, but, beyond that, he says he’s feeling good.

He’s got his cat of 13 years, Sweetheart. He’s talked to his daughter, Jessica, recently, and the PBS signal is still coming in strong.

You’d never know that days earlier the soft-spoken Sharp had finished his most recent round of chemotherapy treatment.

Sharp is not prone to self-pity or asking for much help. On the day in question, as he stands in his modest apartment talking to me via a Zoom connection facilitated by his case manager with Family Eldercare, Sharp expresses gratitude for the assistance he’s received and the minimal side effects of the treatments for a cancerous lesion recently removed from his bladder. He also is slated to undergo gallbladder removal surgery in the spring.

While his polite demeanor and tender nature serve as no sign for concern, the truth is that recently the 65-year-old, who lives alone with Sweetheart, was dangerously close to having to make this choice: paying for medicine or paying for food.

On lean days like those, Sharp turned to a simple diet of canned beans. You’d be hard-pressed to get him to complain about it. He will talk about food, however. The things he loves. Like a pizza loaded with meat. Tacos. And the Hungry Man meals that Jessica delivered to him recently.

Sharp has lived in Austin since 1998, and while he’s had a long tenure in town, his social circle remains limited. He turns to online chat rooms to make friends with folks his age and talk about their lifestyles, and finds joy in watching PBS shows about American history and science.

“I’m not a real socialite,” Sharp says.

Sharp, who successfully manages schizoaffective disorder through a medication regimen, studied chemistry in college. The jazz flutist also studied music, forestry and computer science but eventually cut short a college education that included stints at Stephen F. Austin University and what is now Texas State University.

“It was all so boring; I couldn’t take it anymore,” Sharp says dryly.

After a period of homelessness following a divorce and car accident, Sharp received assistance from Family Eldercare, the organization that nominated him for Season for Caring, which helped stabilize his living situation.

The nonprofit has assisted Sharp, who lives off of disability benefits, with the stress of managing his finances and staying on top of his medical appointments and mounting bills. For that, Sharp is very grateful.

“It makes me feel very comforted to know somebody is going to be there,” Sharp says.

More Season for Caring.

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Boston Market, Chili’s, Planet Fitness and more offering free food, other services in Massachusetts on Election Day

Election Day is causing some added stress to many across the country but free food might add a bit of positivity to the day.

Companies are offering free food, workouts, massages and other deals regardless if you get that “I voted” sticker.

See below for a full list of companies in Massachusetts offering freebies on Tuesday, Nov. 3.

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts is offering free Bluebikes rides. They will be available in Arlington, Boston, Brookline, Cambridge, Everett, Newton, Somerville and Watertown. Customers just need to download the Bluebikes app and then choose “Adventure Pass” for unlimited two-hour rides on Election Day.

Boston Market is offering a late night deal because “Election Day could stretch well into the evening and beyond.” Customers can get a free slider after 9 p.m. on Election Day.

Chili’s is offering the Presidente Margarita in-restaurant or To-Go for $5. Customers will also get a limited-edition sticker to show your support for the “Margarita Party.” Costumers who share a photo on social media of them enjoying the Presidente with #PresidenteForPrez will be entered for a chance to “Live Like a Presidente for a year.” This includes Margarita Party merch, free Chili’s for a year, your own margarita machine and Chili’s margarita drinkware.

DoorDash won’t have any delivery fees for orders of at least $15 on Election Day. Users just need the promo code “VOTE.” DashPass subscribers that already benefit from free delivery will get 10% off, up to $5, with the code DPVOTE.

Jimmy John’s is celebrating National Sandwich Day, which is also on Nov. 3, with a free sandwich. Customers can buy one 8 inch or 16 inch sandwich using the code “SAVEON2” online or in the app to get 50% off any sandwich. The deal lasts until Nov. 8.

Lyft is offering 50% off one ride up to $10 to any polling location or dropbox. Customers just need to use the code 2020VOTE. It also includes bikes and scooters in select cities.

McDonald’s is giving away new bakery items for free, saying Halloween shouldn’t be the only day to treat yourself. The offer lasts from from Nov. 3 through Nov. 9.

Planet Fitness is helping customers “work off election stress” with a free workout and hydromassage. The offer lasts from Nov. 3 through Nov. 8.

Subway is offering a free sandwich when customers buy two.

Uber is offering 50% off roundtrip rides to and from the polls. It also applies on bikes and scooters.

Wendy’s is offering a free Classic Chicken Sandwich with any purchase through Nov. 8.

Be sure to follow all of MassLive’s coverage of the election.

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Power out due to Hurricane Zeta? Here’s how long the food in your fridge, freezer will last | Hurricane Center

If you’re living in the New Orleans metro area, you likely don’t have power right now. 

Aside from wondering when the lights will come back on, your next thought might be figuring out what to do the food in your refrigerator or freezer. 



About 470,000 people without power in Louisiana after Hurricane Zeta

Most of the outages are in the New Orleans metro area.

If the power is still out at your home, do not open your freezer or refrigerator if possible.

Fridges will typically keep food cold for about four hours if not opened, according to the Food and Drug Administration. A full freezer should maintain a safe temperature for about 48 hours if the door stays closed as well. If your freezer is half-full, it should maintain its temp for about 24 hours. 

In the meantime, it’s a good idea to fill up an ice chest with ice and add perishable foods to enjoy until power is restored. 

Once the power is back, though, it’s time to start clearing out what might be spoiled. If your refrigerator reads 40 degrees or lower and the freezer reads 0 when you re-open it, your food should be safe, and frozen food that still retains ice crystals should be safe.

Hurricane Zeta may have sped its way across metro New Orleans, but what it left in its wake were downed trees, streets littered with debris an…

A general rule of thumb: Perishable food that is held at temperatures higher than 40 degrees for more than two hours may be unsafe to eat. That is because bacteria multiply quickly between 40 and 140 degrees.

Even foods that are deemed safe to eat should be thoroughly heated and cooked to minimum safe temperatures.

And, as always, when in doubt throw it out.

For more tips on preparing for a hurricane or power outage, head here.



Preparing for a hurricane: What to buy, what to eat, what to throw out in your kitchen

Now is the time to check your hurricane prep supplies. Along with generators, battery-powered radios or TVs, flashlights, electric candles (so…

Ann Maloney contributed to this report. 


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When will power come back on in New Orleans? Entergy hopes to get it fixed 'through the weekend'

About 400,000 Entergy customers were without power as of 7 a.m. 

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Jefferson Parish asks residents to stay home, limit warm water usage after Hurricane Zeta: report

Traffic lights are out throughout the parish.



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Columbus nonprofits to provide fresh food, pharmacy care to South Linden

Emma Scott Moran
 
| The Columbus Dispatch

The Charitable Pharmacy of Central Ohio will open a second location addressing low-income Franklin County residents’ food and pharmaceutical needs with its “Farmacy in the City” program. 

The nonprofit’s new site, co-located with Community Development for All People, will feature a pharmacy and fresh food market under one roof. Here, vulnerable Franklin County residents can receive non-narcotic prescription medicine, pharmacy services and healthy food at no cost. 

“Our patients may not have access to healthy food and other resources that you need to stay in those healthy habits to reduce your disease burden,” Charitable Pharmacy executive director Jennifer Seifert said. “We’re really excited now that when someone says, ‘I don’t know what to eat,’ we can bring some resources around them.”

Since 2010, CPCO has contributed $50 million in pharmacy services and prescription medicine, today serving over 60,000 Franklin county residents living at or below 200% of the federal poverty level.

More: Charitable Pharmacy sees more patients, more costs due to COVID-19

CPCO’s model is different from that of free clinics. Pharmacists spend time with patients to understand their medical history, explain the impact of their prescribed medicine and create an action plan for the future, development director Melanie Boyd said.

Despite this decade of positive impact, it’s clear that sometimes medicine isn’t the most pressing need when patients walk through the pharmacy’s doors. Basic needs such as food, shelter and clothing often take precedence. 

After receiving a $1.5 million grant from the Franklin County Board of Commissioners in 2019, CPCO began exploring communities where its support could have the most impact and identified South Linden as a place where it could help the neighborhood achieve better health outcomes.

The unfortunate truth is that one’s zip code often determines the quality of their health care.

“You go to the suburbs and look at how many pharmacies you have per capita — it’s a real different story in some other sections of the city,” Boyd said. “We know that coming in (to South Linden) as a charitable pharmacy to work with the existing pharmacies, we’re going to be able to meet more of that need.” 

When the Rev. John Edgar, executive director of Community Development for All People, approached the pharmacy about sharing Eagle Market — a South Linden carryout shut down by the city in 2016 — CPCO jumped on the opportunity. 

“Seventy percent of our patients are either screened positive for malnutrition or express food insecurity,” Boyd said. “That was one of the reasons this was just obvious, it was just such a clear fit.”

South Linden currently has no full-service grocery store, and this food scarcity has a measurable impact. Its residents have a life expectancy of just under 70 years, seven years less than the Franklin County average. 

The “Farmacy in the City” hopes to improve this disparity by fulfilling food and health needs and emphasizing the idea of “food as medicine.”

A $149,444 grant from the Connections for Cardiovascular

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North America Food Allergen Testing Market Forecast to 2027

The North America food allergen testing market is expected to grow from US$ 201. 33 million in 2018 to US$ 403. 90 million by 2027; it is estimated to grow at a CAGR of 8. 1% from 2019 to 2027. Anaphylaxis and food allergy are among leading causes of public health risk in developed countries such as the US and Canada.

New York, Oct. 27, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Reportlinker.com announces the release of the report “North America Food Allergen Testing Market Forecast to 2027 – COVID-19 Impact and Regional Analysis by Source, Technology, and Food Tested” – https://www.reportlinker.com/p05978897/?utm_source=GNW
Although the prevalence is higher in young children, recent studies indicate it is becoming more common in adolescents and young adults.

Moreover, there is growing evidence of the increasing prevalence of food allergies in rapidly developing countries.Food allergy incidence is rapidly rising in developed regions such as North America.

According to the Food Allergy Research and Education (FARE), ~32 million people in the US have some kind of food allergies. ~11% of people between the age group 18–26 million adults have food allergies in the US. ~40% of children in the country have multiple food allergies, i.e., they are allergic to more than one food type. In the US, 200,000 people require emergency medical care every year for allergic reactions caused due to food. The country also witnessed 377% increase in medical procedures to treat anaphylaxis or food allergies from 2007 to 2016. This further bolsters the growth of the food allergen testing market
In 2018, the milk segment led the North America food allergen testing market, based on source.Milk, as well as milk product, allergy is one of the most commonly found food allergies among children.

Cow milk is one of the usual causes of milk allergies; however, milk from sheep, buffalo, goats, and other mammals can also cause allergic reactions, which occur occurs soon after the consumption of milk.Signs and symptoms of milk allergy range from mild to severe, and they include vomiting, wheezing, hives, and digestive problems, varying from person to person.

Milk allergy can also cause anaphylaxis, a severe, life-threatening reaction.Avoiding milk and milk products is the prime solutions to avoid complications associated with milk allergies.

Apart from the symptoms mentioned above, immediate signs and symptoms might include itching or tingling feeling around the lips or mouth; swelling of the lips, tongue, or throat; and coughing or shortness of breath.
Presently, major countries in North America are under lockdown due to the COVID 19 pandemic.In the high-impact countries in the region, isolation and social distancing measures have been put in place.

The lesser production of goods and commodities is hampering the growth of the North America food allergen testing market as the demand for these solutions has declined over the past couple of months.The US has reported the highest number of confirmed cases of as the disease in this region.

The outbreak and measures taken to contain the infection spread are likely to impact the food &

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The Future of Food With SIAL Insights And SIAL Innovation

SIAL Paris, the world’s foremost food industry trade fair remains true to its mission: federate and guide the transformation of the sector’s companies on a global scale, despite the postponement of its physical edition to October 2022.

“It was important to share in a digital webinar the trendbook ‘SIAL Insights’ which was the culmination of large-scale studies performed in 2020 by our expert partners Kantar, Gira and ProtéinesXTC” said Nicolas Trentesaux, CEO of SIAL Global Network.

“The surveys were conducted with regard to the theme #Ownthechange, which resonates even more deeply today. The results are an important source of information for all those seeking to understand the challenges, trends and innovations that are shaping this period,” pursued Adeline Vancauwelaert, General Manager of SIAL Paris.

The studies show that food is becoming a statement: citizenship, involvement, and commitment are the by-words, and COVID-19 is catalyzing the trend.

73% of consumers have changed their eating habits over the last two years. 63% consider that the way they eat is a societal commitment, meaning choosing the world in which they want to live. 33% have reclaimed their power by adopting at least one major behavioral change or by boycotting certain brands or products. Their motivation? A healthier diet (70%), more local and seasonal food (53%), free of controversial ingredients (44%). The trend extends to stores, where healthy products are increasingly abundant, and to a lesser extent to restaurants, which are putting more emphasis on traceability, local and seasonal products, and shorter menus.

Regarding the food industry, pleasure and health are motors for innovation, with three major trends: back to basics, as local as possible, understated enjoyments.

The SIAL Innovation Awards 2020 shows the intention on the part of industrials to propose products that address the profound consumer desire for change. Out of 500 applications received, the jury awarded 17 prizes among 8 categories and 6 special prizes. The Grands Prix are:

Gold: BOCON (IT) for their frozen vegetable Gnocchi (70% vegetable) and combination of spices.

Silver: PATISSERIE DES FLANDRES (FR) for their Origine labeled Maroilles cheese flavoured mini waffles. A fresh product that only needs 5m in the oven for a quick snack or a cocktail party.

Bronze: TRIUMPH (FR) for Toogood Chewing Gum, a natural gum without aspartame that biodegrades in 3 months versus 5 years.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201026005021/en/

Contacts

Isabelle Cremoux-Mirgalet
[email protected]

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YouTube influencers are marketing junk food to kids

The study demonstrates how advertisers are seeking to take advantage of new avenues to market their wares to children.

“We should approach YouTube influencer videos with skepticism, even with videos that seem to be educational or kid-friendly,” said senior author Marie Bragg, an assistant professor of public health nutrition with joint appointments at New York University’s School of Global Public Health and Langone Medical Center.

Of the 418 YouTube videos that fell within their search criteria, the researchers found that 179 of the videos featured food or drinks, with 90% of those instances showing unhealthy branded items, such as fast food.

Those specific YouTube videos were viewed more than a billion times.

A new kind of marketing

Keeping track of what types of food advertising children are exposed to is important. That’s because dietary habits during childhood can have a significant effect on their likelihood of their becoming obese or developing cardiovascular disease and Type 2 diabetes later in life, according to past research.

And while much food advertising takes place on television, companies have increasingly turned to the growing audiences on social media sites such as YouTube.

One of the most important aspects of the study, Bragg said, was simply bringing attention to the fact that YouTube’s most popular under-18 hosts are frequently promoting products directly, and kids are often glued to the message.

“This kind of marketing is uncharted territory for families and researchers,” she said. Parents “may think they’re setting their kids down to watch another kid play in their backyard,” not children promoting Chicken McNuggets for a fee.

That’s particularly true during the pandemic with parents turning to screen time to keep kids occupied when there are fewer in-person activities and parents are working from home.

“Child exposure to unhealthy food, beverage, and other content on YouTube needs to be regulated,” said Dr. Jenny Radesky, lead author of the American Academy of Pediatrics policy statement on digital advertising to children, via email. “‘Host-selling’ — the practice of trusted characters promoting products within their own videos — needs to stop on YouTube, because it’s not allowed on TV.” Radesky was not involved in the study.
One major type of YouTube influencer video, which can feature food, is the phenomenon known as “unboxing videos,” in which people open up boxes of products while they narrate or comment on what they’re doing. The videos can blur the line between a product review and advertising outright.

“While the adult digital ecosystem is driven by ad revenue and persuasive design, that doesn’t mean that children’s digital spaces should be,” added Radesky, who is also an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Michigan. “We need a new children’s design code of ethics in the US.”

One popular YouTube channel, Ryan’s World, which was one of the five major influencer channels featured in the study, boasts more than 26 million subscribers. It features videos with food and stars a young boy who frequently plays with toys on screen.
“Parents shouldn’t allow
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As coronavirus cases top 50,000, food lines grow

On a day when Palm Beach County’s recorded coronavirus cases surpassed 50,000 to reach 50,316, the pandemic’s staggering effects could be glimpsed in one food pantry’s distribution line Saturday. 



a car parked on the side of a road: People wait in their cars to be tested for the coronavirus at a drive up rapid testing site at the FITTEAM Ballpark of the Palm Beaches Friday in West Palm Beach. (GREG LOVETT / THE PALM BEACH POST)


© Greg Lovett, The Palm Beach Post
People wait in their cars to be tested for the coronavirus at a drive up rapid testing site at the FITTEAM Ballpark of the Palm Beaches Friday in West Palm Beach. (GREG LOVETT / THE PALM BEACH POST)

“They just try to hold on, so they don’t have to ask for free food. They’ve done their best to try to find work, but they’ve had to relent,” said Dan Shorter, founder and volunteer chief executive of Feed the Hungry Pantry, which runs the grocery distribution outside the United Methodist Church in West Palm Beach. “The virus has that much of a hold in our community.”

More: Cerabino: Florida’s response to pandemic? Just stop it (from being reported)

The 328 new cases reported in the county Saturday is the fourth time in five days that new cases have topped 200, a spike not seen since Gov. Ron DeSantis ordered the full reopening of businesses on Sept. 25.

Statewide cases soared by 4,471 to 776,251. That raises new cases in the past week to 23,770, the most since early September. 

The numbers are even more staggering when you consider the ripples they set off. An eyewitness to what he calls “the hell of this virus,” Shorter said the pantry has seen a dramatic rise in the number of families it serves each month since the start of the pandemic.

“We’ve never seen this many people unemployed. Most of the people we’re feeding, up until March, never thought they would be in a food line. They were living check to check. But you miss a couple of checks and what do you do?” he said. “The new families we’ve seen since March have email addresses and computers. They’re not the historically poor.”

More: Miracle recovery, school district turmoil: Here’s the back story on what The Post does best

Feed the Hungry Pantry went from serving 3,000 families per month to serving 10,000 families per month, Shorter said. And because the charity has been seeing larger households, the amount of provisions granted per family has increased as well — from 120 pounds per family to 150 pounds per family.

“We’re seeing more first-time requests than ever before,” said Shorter, whose food distribution efforts rely on his charity’s public and private-sector partnerships. “Some people have held on for as long as they could. They’ve held onto their savings and supplies, and now they can’t do it any longer. Some got their jobs back only to be laid off again.”

The pandemic numbers do not simply tell the stories of individuals affected physically by a virus — they are indicators of COVID’s domino effect, said one social service strategist working with hard-hit families.

“It’s impacting every part of people’s lives. That’s what we’re seeing,” said Jaime-Lee Bradshaw, chief strategic

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More Hispanic workers impacted by Covid-19 in food processing and agriculture workplaces, CDC study finds

More Hispanic workers were impacted by the coronavirus pandemic in food processing plants, manufacturing plants and agriculture workplaces in the US last spring than workers of other races or ethnicities, a team led by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Monday.



a close up of a flower: Coronavirus has disproportionately impacted Hispanic workers, CDC study says.


© Reuters
Coronavirus has disproportionately impacted Hispanic workers, CDC study says.

The study found that nearly 73% of workers at meat and poultry plants and similar settings across the country who were diagnosed with the virus were Hispanic or Latino, despite accounting for only 37% of the work force in these work places.

“Our study supports findings from prior reports that part of the disproportionate burden of COVID-19 among some racial and ethnic minority groups is likely related to occupational risk,” the team wrote.

Officials across the country have been reporting for months that the pandemic was disproportionately impacting communities of color due to a variety of reasons, including working and living conditions as well as equitable access to healthcare.

The CDC examined information collected from state health departments about workers with confirmed Covid-19 in food processing and manufacturing plants and agricultural settings between March 1 and May 31.

Nearly 73% of people diagnosed with coronavirus were Hispanic or Latino, 6.3% were Black and 4.1% were Asian or Pacific Islander, the survey found. This suggests “Hispanic or Latino, non-Hispanic Black, and non-Hispanic Asian/Pacific Islander workers in these workplaces might be disproportionately affected by COVID-19,” the researchers wrote in the CDC journal Emerging Infectious Diseases.

The researchers found reports on mass testing in US meat and poultry plants revealed widespread coronavirus outbreaks and found high numbers of asymptomatic or presymptomatic infections.

High-density workplaces can cause a higher risk for transmission of Covid-19, the researchers reported.

“These findings support the need for comprehensive testing strategies, coupled with contact tracing and symptom screening, for high-density critical infrastructure workplaces to aid in identifying infections and reducing transmission within the workplace,” the study concluded.

Only 36 states reported data, and testing strategies varied by workplace so that influenced the number of cases detected, the CDC said. Plus workers hesitant to report illness could have led to an underestimation of cases among workers.

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