Glace Bay father happy class-action lawsuit being launched against Bedford dentist | Local | News

GLACE BAY, N.S. —

MacGillivray Injury and Insurance plans to conduct 135 interviews with people who say they were victims of dentist Dr. Errol Guam.

Ryan Binder is one of them and the Glace Bay father was one of the first to contact the law firm after filing complaints with police and the dental board in relation to his six-year-old daughter’s appointment with Gaum on Nov. 10.

“I wanted (Dr. Gaum) to be accountable for all the people he has hurt over the years,” Binder said.

“I feel good about it because I don’t think a big law firm like MacGillivary would take it on if they didn’t think they could win.”

A press release from the firm Friday evening, the day MacGillivary decided to take on the case, indicated they had 60 possible claimants on the suit. By Saturday afternoon that number had more than doubled.

Managing partner Jamie MacGillivray said there was “nothing normal” about this case but couldn’t disclose much more due to it being in the early stages of the process.

“We have 135 phone intakes scheduled over the weekend with two lawyers … and more intake calls have been coming in … there are a lot of people coming two us at this point,” MacGillivray said.

“The first step we have is to determine how to legally file this action … we plan to file the claim this week.”

Binder claimed during his daughter’s appointment with Gaum he hurt and traumatized her by restraining her physically and verbally abusing her during the appointment.

After filing a complaint with the Dental Board of Nova Scotia and Halifax Regional Police, Binder posted about the incident on Facebook on Nov. 11 in hopes of alerting others to what allegedly happened.

By Nov. 12, two Facebook groups were made for victims of Dr. Errol Gaum. One is private and currently has more than 560 members. The other is public and has more than 2,100 members.

Halifax Regional Police confirmed they are currently investigating multiple allegations

Nicole Sullivan is an education, enterprise and diversity reporter for the Cape Breton Post. 

RELATED:

Source Article

Read more

Father runs around hospital for 4-year-old son with cancer

There were two thoughts pushing Kolt Codner forward in his first marathon race: his 4-year-old son Andrew’s fight against cancer and the hospital that provides him care.



a group of people in a park: An Ohio dad ran his first marathon to support his son fighting cancer and raise money for Akron Children's Hospital.


© Courtesy Akron Children’s Hospital
An Ohio dad ran his first marathon to support his son fighting cancer and raise money for Akron Children’s Hospital.

Codner, of Poland, Ohio, ran 26.2 miles around Akron Children’s Hospital on October 17 to raise money for the hospital treating his son, who has 26 months left in his treatment.

In early May, Codner and his wife Tristan received a phone call that Andrew had a bed waiting for him in the hematology and oncology unit of the hospital.

A day that began as a visit to the pediatrician for Andrew’s swollen face had resulted in a diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, a common childhood cancer.

Codner’s run served to show his appreciation to the hospital staff that has turned a traumatic experience like cancer treatment into one his young son faces bravely, Codner says.

“The folks at Akron Children’s have taken something that should be scary and terrifying and made it this amazing badge of honor to recognize the superhero that he is,” Codner told CNN. “We couldn’t think of a better thing to contribute to and spend time trying to help raise funds to ensure that all kids have access to the same amazing experience as Andrew has had at Akron Children’s.”

Codner participated in the race as part of the virtual FirstEnergy Akron Marathon, Half Marathon & Team Relay, which replaced the hospital’s yearly marathon due to the coronavirus pandemic. According to the virtual marathon guidelines, runners can race at any location or pace, and Codner decided to run his marathon around the hospital to spotlight their work.

On the day of the race, Codner wrote Andrew’s name on the top of his running shoes to keep him motivated. Friends and family were stationed outside the hospital to cheer him on, in a course that took 5 hours and 35 laps to complete. His son was even able to run with him across the finish line and award him a medal.

“To see him running and doing that last lap with me was just incredible,” Codner said.

By the end of the run, Codner had raised 10 times more than his initial goal of $1,000, according to a hospital press release. The fund has reached over $13,000 in donations and has expanded its window until November 30.

Dr. Megan Sampson, a pediatric oncologist who has treated Andrew at the hospital, praises the Codner family.

“It just amazed me that during this scary time that he was thinking about doing this,” said Sampson, referring to Codner’s run and the attention he has drawn to the hospital’s work.

Andrew’s prognosis is good and he’s responding well to the treatment he has received, but he still has a long way to go, Sampson says.



Kolt Codner's son awards him with a medal after completing his marathon to raise money for Akron Children's Hospital.


© Courtesy Akron Children’s Hospital
Kolt Codner’s son awards him with a

Read more
  • Partner links