United Family Medicine Board Names Chief Executive Officer

ST. PAUL, Minn.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–United Family Medicine (UFM), a federally-qualified health center (FQHC) in St. Paul dedicated to meeting the health care demands of its community while contributing to the vitality of the region, announced today that its board of directors promoted Ann Nyakundi to CEO effective immediately.

Nyakundi joined the organization as interim CEO in October 2019, establishing priorities to re-design UFM’s care model to improve patients’ access to its services, maintain highest level health outcomes, and achieve compliance with the Health Resources Services Administration (HRSA), its federal regulator and primary funder. The resulting transformative changes, including migrating from its Allina-leased provider arrangement to hiring its own full complement of physicians, place UFM on track to attain regulatory compliance, while improving patients’ ability to see their doctors and health care team more quickly than ever before.

“It’s my desire and our collective responsibility to provide the best health care possible to every one of our patients, at the time that they need it, and we’re making numerous changes to meet this commitment,” said Nyakundi. “I’m grateful to UFM’s board of directors for the confidence it’s placed in me as its CEO, and excited to continue our work to place patients at the center of our response to community needs.”

Through the onset and continuing stressors of the Covid-19 pandemic, Nyakundi empowered her teams to improve access to care, such as the advanced practitioners who launched telemedicine as a service. This prompt response resulted in UFM regaining most of the patient visits that were delayed due to the pandemic, while significantly reducing UFM’s operating deficit and reliance on a part-time physician workforce. These cost efficiencies will allow UFM to expand dental and other services.

“Ann’s skill as a health care leader and her ethical and motivational orientation has steered United Family Medicine forward through the extreme challenges that its operating structure posed and the Covid-19 pandemic continues to present,” said Daymond Dean, UFM Executive Committee Board Member. “Our patients’ lives and well-being depend on their ability to receive the services that a community health center provides, and Ann is immeasurably qualified to ensure that UFM delivers those services and high-quality health care to our community.

Nyakundi pursued undergraduate and graduate medical anthropology and health care administration at the University of Michigan and University of Minnesota respectively, and brings to her role expertise in community health, philanthropy, strategic planning and health policy. Having experienced homelessness as a child without access to adequate options for high quality health care, inspired her career and commitment to public health. Most recently she volunteered for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) as a National Expert for the New Models of Primary Care Workforce and Financing Project, provided strategic support to the National Marrow Donor Program and worked within the Primary Care Services Division of the American Cancer Society.

About United Family Medicine

United Family Medicine, a federally qualified health center in St. Paul, Minnesota, provides high quality primary care, dental services and

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United Family Medicine Board Names Chief Executive Officer – Press Release

ST. PAUL, Minn.–(Business Wire)–United Family Medicine (UFM), a federally-qualified health center (FQHC) in St. Paul dedicated to meeting the health care demands of its community while contributing to the vitality of the region, announced today that its board of directors promoted Ann Nyakundi to CEO effective immediately.

Nyakundi joined the organization as interim CEO in October 2019, establishing priorities to re-design UFM’s care model to improve patients’ access to its services, maintain highest level health outcomes, and achieve compliance with the Health Resources Services Administration (HRSA), its federal regulator and primary funder. The resulting transformative changes, including migrating from its Allina-leased provider arrangement to hiring its own full complement of physicians, place UFM on track to attain regulatory compliance, while improving patients’ ability to see their doctors and health care team more quickly than ever before.

“It’s my desire and our collective responsibility to provide the best health care possible to every one of our patients, at the time that they need it, and we’re making numerous changes to meet this commitment,” said Nyakundi. “I’m grateful to UFM’s board of directors for the confidence it’s placed in me as its CEO, and excited to continue our work to place patients at the center of our response to community needs.”

Through the onset and continuing stressors of the Covid-19 pandemic, Nyakundi empowered her teams to improve access to care, such as the advanced practitioners who launched telemedicine as a service. This prompt response resulted in UFM regaining most of the patient visits that were delayed due to the pandemic, while significantly reducing UFM’s operating deficit and reliance on a part-time physician workforce. These cost efficiencies will allow UFM to expand dental and other services.

“Ann’s skill as a health care leader and her ethical and motivational orientation has steered United Family Medicine forward through the extreme challenges that its operating structure posed and the Covid-19 pandemic continues to present,” said Daymond Dean, UFM Executive Committee Board Member. “Our patients’ lives and well-being depend on their ability to receive the services that a community health center provides, and Ann is immeasurably qualified to ensure that UFM delivers those services and high-quality health care to our community.

Nyakundi pursued undergraduate and graduate medical anthropology and health care administration at the University of Michigan and University of Minnesota respectively, and brings to her role expertise in community health, philanthropy, strategic planning and health policy. Having experienced homelessness as a child without access to adequate options for high quality health care, inspired her career and commitment to public health. Most recently she volunteered for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) as a National Expert for the New Models of Primary Care Workforce and Financing Project, provided strategic support to the National Marrow Donor Program and worked within the Primary Care Services Division of the American Cancer Society.

About United Family Medicine

United Family Medicine, a federally qualified health center in St. Paul, Minnesota, provides high quality primary care, dental services and behavioral health

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How family medicine has changed on P.E.I. since COVID hit

You don’t have to spend much time at Dr. Kristy Newson’s office in Charlottetown to discover COVID-19 has changed the way she and her staff do their jobs. 

For one, the family doctor’s waiting room is completely empty, and the door locked. 

“We try not to fill up our waiting rooms just to avoid patients spreading infections,” said Newson, who also serves as president of the P.E.I. College of Family Physicians. 

“So we ask them to remain in their car until their appointment time. We then call down to them and they come right into the office. And between each patient, we have to disinfect and clean the rooms completely before the next patient can be seen.”

That means she’s not able to see as many patients at her office throughout the day — at least not without extending her hours.

Patients of some family physicians are now being instructed to wait in their vehicles for their appointment, as some waiting rooms like this one are off-limits. (Steve Bruce/CBC)

While Newson said some family physicians are doing just that, she and many others have turned to telephones and web cameras, as a way to squeeze in more patients. 

“Between each [in-person] patient I do some telemedicine appointments, just to give my staff the chance to clean the rooms,” said Newson.  

“We try to triage them over the phone, and if it’s a concern that could be addressed via telemedicine or virtual care, the patient would be offered that style of appointment. If they prefer to see us in person, or if we feel it’s something that needs a physical exam, then we would book them a regular routine visit in our office.”

Doctors seeing just as many patients

According to Health PEI, about 30 per cent of care provided by Island family physicians is now virtual or over the phone. 

Newson maintains with the move to more virtual appointments, there’s been minimal impact on the quality and speed of care family physicians can provide. 

“The perception may be that physicians aren’t seeing as many patients. But truly, it’s more a change in the type of appointments we’re able to offer,” said Newson.

“I wouldn’t say the wait times for urgent or semi-urgent appointments are any longer at this stage. Possibly for non-urgent, annual checkups, those sorts of things, those things have probably been pushed several months down the road.”

Rooms have to be cleaned between appointments, which lowers the number of patients family physicians are able to see in person each day, unless they extend their hours. (Steve Bruce/CBC)

Another change for family physicians since the start of the pandemic — they’ve stopped seeing patients with coughs, fevers and sore throats. 

They’re now directed to the cough and fever clinics in Charlottetown and Summerside. 

“That’s just to prevent the spread of infectious disease at family medicine offices,” said Newson.

“At the cough and fever clinics, they’re able to provide separate exits and entrances for the patients, patients are able to

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Compass Health Building Communities of Hope Gala Raises More Than $165,000 to Benefit Child, Youth and Family Behavioral Health Services

The virtual event, held on World Mental Health Day, brought together community members and honored client voices and stories

Compass Health’s Building Communities of Hope Gala raised more than $165,000 in support of the organization’s child, youth and family behavioral health services during a virtual event held on World Mental Health Day, Saturday, October 10, 2020.

Funds exceeded Compass Health’s goals by $15,000, as more than 250 community members gathered virtually to celebrate client voices and stories, even forming socially distant “watch parties” while the event was streamed online. Organizers attribute the support, in part, to a greater recognition of the need for behavioral health resources as the community faces the impacts of COVID-19.

“We know that this year has been demanding in many ways – in fact, the pandemic has exacerbated the medical, educational, economic and social challenges that many of our families face – making community support more crucial than ever,” said Tom Sebastian, president and CEO of Compass Health. “It was thrilling and gratifying to see our community come together, and to watch our team innovate to create a meaningful shared experience while keeping everyone safe through a virtual format.”

One of the evening’s highlights included a video presentation led by Amanda, a Compass Health team member, and her son, who was a client of Compass Health’s WISe youth wraparound services. The video revealed that Amanda was so inspired by the treatment and care that her son received, that she joined the organization as a parent partner with WISe almost two years ago. During the video, Amanda and her son also shared how Compass Health has helped them navigate changes and develop important communication and coping skills.

“It was amazing to see the impact of sharing our story,” Amanda said. “As a parent partner, I know how important it is to destigmatize mental health, and the response to the video has been overwhelming. I’m particularly proud of my son, who really wanted to share with others that they’re not alone, and that Compass Health has been such a positive force in his life.”

Presented in part by Kaiser Permanente, First Interstate Bank, Genoa Healthcare and Integrated Telehealth Solutions, this year’s fundraiser benefits Compass Heath’s child, youth and family services. The primary beneficiaries are Compass Health’s Child and Family Outpatient Programs, Children’s Intensive Services / Wraparound with Intensive Services (WISe), Camp Outside the Box, Camp Mariposa, Child Advocacy Program (CAP), and Compass Health’s Therapeutic Foster Care Program.

The robust list of programs supported by this year’s Gala exemplifies the range of services offered by the 118-year-old organization. With a focus on providing a full spectrum of accessible care, Compass Health’s child, family and youth programs are designed to promote positive changes in behavior, help the child and family learn appropriate coping skills, and improve communication skills including learning to resolve conflict and manage emotions in a healthy manner. In addition to honoring the family voice and choice, clinical services such as the Child Advocacy Program offer

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Federal family separation policy amounts to ‘torture’

The U.S. government’s policy of separating migrant children from their families at the southern border is “cruel, inhuman,” and “rises to the level of torture,” according to a new academic article authored by a slate of doctors throughout the country.

The paper, published Tuesday in the medical journal Pediatrics, found that the controversial anti-immigration practice meets the UN’s three criteria to be defined as torture for children: It causes “severe pain and suffering,” it’s purposeful and it’s state-sponsored.

“Targeted physical and psychological abuse is inflicted on children,” the authors wrote, adding that the suffering is severe given their age and stage of development. “It is a purposeful strategy of the state to use children to reduce border crossings by their parents.”

The authors concluded their article with a call to action, asking that pediatricians, child health care professionals and child advocacy organizations to work together across disciplines, to stop the torture of children in the U.S. and around the world.

This they said, would include training child health care professionals how to identify, document and educate others on the effects of this trauma and for the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) to lead a global call for family reunification.

UCSF family medicine Dr. Coleen Kivlahan, one of the paper’s co-authors, said there’s been an active discussion for years among pediatricians and family medicine doctors about what should be done to care for those separated at the border. The paper’s authors are comprised of doctors who have treated patients at the border and some like Kivlahan, who, as co-chair of the UCSF Health and Human Rights Initiative, works with migrant families who have relocated to the Bay Area.

Kivlahan said doctors have long struggled with how to legally define what was happening to the children — who were taken from their families during early developmental stages, and kept in cages without proper food, warmth or proper hygiene.

But the laws against child abuse are related to the caregiver or the parent, Kivlahan explained, and that didn’t apply at the border.

“That’s why we called this torture,” said Kivlahan. “We talked to these doctors from all over the world, and they agreed: (The policies) didn’t meet the diagnosis of child abuse, they met the diagnosis of torture,” given that the acts were carried out by federal officials.

The practice of removing children from their families stemmed from the Trump administration’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy launched in eary 2018 — a series of punitive actions taken against people caught crossing the border illegally. The polices, intended to deter illegal immigration, garnered widespread outrage from both sides of the aisle, prompting Trump to sign an executive order in June 2018, to end the family separation portion.

But several news and advocacy outlets, including the Southern Poverty Law Center, reported that family separations continued long after the executive order.

The article states that in 2019 over 851,000 people were apprehended on the border, including 473,682 families and 76,020 unaccompanied minors.

The paper’s authors include six

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Ex-doctor whose patient killed Montgomery family in wreck sentenced to 7 years for fraud

A former doctor was recently sentenced to federal prison on fraud charges he incurred after a prescription patient of his high on medication fatally crashed into a family of four driving home from church in Conroe.

Rezik A. Saqer, 66, of Houston, was sentenced to seven years on Oct. 9 by Chief U.S. District Judge Lee H. Rosenthal of the Southern District of Texas. Rosenthal ordered Saqer to pay $5 million in restitution for fraudulently billing health care programs.

In early July 2019, Saqer pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit health care fraud. Saqer, according to an Oct. 9 release from the U.S. Department of Justice, was a physician and anesthesiologist at Texas Pain Solutions and Integra Medical Clinic.


Saqer’s patient, Ronald Evan Cooper, 73, of Montgomery, was sentenced to 80 years in prison in May 2017 for intoxication manslaughter. Cooper fatally struck with his car Roland Sedlmeier, 49, Melinda Sedlmeier, 42, Harley, 6, and Sofie, 4, as the family departed Sunday church service Sept. 20, 2015 on Texas 105.

Evidence presented at Saqer’s sentencing showed he had patients submit to “unnecessary and dangerous” procedures and tests as performed by his unlicensed staff and then billed them to health care providers as if he had carried out the work, the District Attorney’s office stated.

Health care providers were fraudulently billed more than $14.6 million by Saquer, according to the DOJ press release.

Additionally, “Saqer’s scheme contributed to multiple overdose deaths,” read a statement from the DA’s Office.

Citing an interest in not conflicting with Saqer’s prosecution in federal court, the District Attorney’s Office dismissed six murder charges the former doctor was facing and a seventh felony charge. These seven charges resulted from the prosecution of Cooper, according to the DA’s office.

Between March 2014 and September 2015, five of Saqer’s patients allegedly died as a result of him furnishing them drugs knowing they were substance abusers. A sixth murder charge alleged a patient in 2011 died after Saqer had an unlicensed person furnish “nontherapeutic” drugs, according to a probable cause affidavit.

The other dismissed charge was for a first-degree organized criminal activity felony for allegedly billing insurance companies for services not rendered in the span of five years, the affidavit showed.

The charges for which Saqer was sentenced resulted from work on the case against him as led by Assistant DA Tamara Holland, along with the Texas Department of Insurance and the Conroe Police Department, the DA’s Office stated.

“I want to thank all of the many people who worked so hard to obtain this outcome. There were endless hours spent on this case by a significant number of investigators and prosecutors, all to ensure Dr. Saqer finally met justice for his dangerous scheme,” Holland said in a statement.

District Attorney Brett Ligon spoke on the impact the Sedlmeier crash had on his office.

“I am proud to have our office work in close cooperation with multiple state and federal agencies, to investigate a case that has affected our community

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Dr. Sherry Powell, Dentist In West Columbia SC, Provides Gentle, Affordable Dental Care For The Family – Press Release

Dr. Sherry Powell, Dentist In West Columbia SC, Provides Gentle, Affordable Dental Care For The Family

Dentist Dr. Sherry Powell is considered to be among the best dentists in West Columbia SC. As a gentle family dentist for the community, Dr. Powell has the expertise to offer services such as dental cleanings, porcelain veneers, composite fillings, etc.

According to announcements released by Dr. Sherry Powell, this dentist in West Columbia SC provides expert dental care in a comfortable and peaceful environment. Her services are affordable and include dentures, teeth whitening, root canal, veneers, dental implants, and family dentistry. Patients can book same-day appointments and meet with her to discuss oral health issues and develop a dental health plan.  

Dr. Sherry Powell is trusted by families to address children’s dental health issues. Children need to learn about proper oral care from an early age. Periodic dental check-ups are an excellent way to apprise them of the right way to maintain oral hygiene, prevent dental caries, and ensure that their gums and teeth stay healthy for life. Through her pediatric dentistry experience, Dr. Powell enables children to grow up healthy, speak clearly, and smile confidently.

Dr. Powell helps her patients gain an alluring smile through porcelain veneers, which are thin shells of ceramic attached to the front portion of one’s teeth. This cosmetic dental enhancement is highly durable and can last for up to 25 years with very little maintenance. Veneers are a very agreeable solution for malformed, discolored, and misaligned teeth. 

The clinic of this dentist near me is also a popular choice for teeth whitening. Both men and women have benefited from Dr. Powell’s services by acquiring whiter teeth that no longer exhibit the stains from sodas, caffeine, and food colors.

For more information, go to https://www.dentistdrpowell.com/

Dr. Sherry Powell said, “Our team offers our patients full service dental care that addresses their every dental need. From routine dental cleanings to teeth whitening, we offer it all under one roof to save you the time, money and the hassle of bouncing between multiple specialists. We believe in offering high quality, professional dental care with compassion and a soft touch. We offer dental care that is gentle, relaxing and above all, exceptional. From the moment you walk in our doors, we aim to put your mind at ease that your teeth are in the best hands possible. We treat each patient with the care and kindness that we would our own family.”

On dental cleaning services provided at the clinic, Dr. Powell said, “Your teeth are one of the most important features which should be kept healthy and beautiful. To maintain it, you need to have a regular oral check-up just like body check-ups. These check-ups may involve cleaning of teeth, removing a cavity, fixing a broken tooth, teeth whitening, etc. Researchers have shown that problems related to the teeth and gums can indicate some major health issues in the body, so regular check-ups are important.

If you live in West Columbia or a nearby region, you will be glad to know that Dr Sherry Powell is

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As COVID-19 cases soar, many Americans plan indoor Thanksgiving with friends or extended family




a close up of a sign


© Yahoo News



As United States COVID-19 cases climb toward a new peak and hospitalizations increase across most of the country, more than a third of registered voters (34 percent) plan to celebrate Thanksgiving with friends or family from outside their households, according to a new Yahoo News/YouGov poll — and nearly all of them plan to gather indoors.

Another quarter (25 percent) say they’re still not sure how they will spend the Thanksgiving holiday, meaning that right now, amid a worsening pandemic, a majority of American voters are at least considering joining friends or family indoors on Nov. 26.

The survey, which was conducted from Oct. 16 to 18, reveals just how challenging it may be to contain America’s latest COVID-19 surge. New daily cases recently topped 70,000 nationwide for the first time since July; hospitalizations are on the rise in 39 states, with 16 approaching or exceeding all-time highs. Colder weather is making outdoor gatherings impractical in many places. And the big, garrulous, close-knit indoor meals with friends and family that define the holiday season are precisely the stuff that superspreader events are made of. 



text


© Provided by Yahoo! News


Dr. Anthony Fauci, the U.S. government’s top infectious disease expert, told Yahoo News last week that he would not celebrate Thanksgiving with his children because they are concerned about spreading the deadly virus. “I have three children that I would love to see over Thanksgiving,” Fauci said. The 79-year-old doctor noted that he falls in a vulnerable age group.

Yet many Americans won’t be following Fauci’s lead. Beyond the 30 percent of respondents who plan to gather indoors with friends or extended family and the 25 percent who haven’t ruled it out — percentages that could represent tens of millions of people, or more — 9 percent of respondents say they plan to travel for Thanksgiving. Another 9 percent are considering it. And just 21 percent of those who plan to gather with friends or extended family members say they would be willing to cancel their Thanksgiving plans if COVID-19 cases surged in their area. 

One month later, it’s Christmas. 

The point isn’t to shame Americans into skipping the holidays. We’re all weary of the virus. We all want to hit pause for a special day. We’re all desperate to eat, drink, relax and watch football with loved ones. And we all care about keeping our friends and family safe. There are no satisfying choices here. 

But America will face a test on Thanksgiving, and it’s basically just a supercharged version of the test we have faced throughout the pandemic: How much normal is OK right now? 

The problem is that it’s a test we have failed time and again in circumstances far less tempting than Thanksgiving — which in turn is why Thanksgiving itself has suddenly become a far more dangerous temptation than it had to be. 



According to a new Yahoo News/YouGov poll, a majority of American voters are at least considering joining friends or family indoors on Thanksgiving. (Photo illustration: Yahoo News; photo: EyeEm/Getty Images)


© Provided by Yahoo! News
According to a new Yahoo News/YouGov poll, a majority of American voters are at

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3 members of same Missouri family die of coronavirus, 5 more sickened

Less than a year into the coronavirus pandemic, Covid-19 has already taken an enormous toll on one St. Louis woman’s family, leaving her mother and two relatives dead, while also sickening her and four other family members.

“The biggest thing I would tell people that’s short and sweet is that this thing is real, and to please protect yourself in every way that you possibly can,” Erin Griffin told NBC News.

Griffin, 40, who lives in the St. Louis suburb of Florissant, Missouri, said that Covid first struck her 72-year-old great uncle, Cornelius Brooks, who died in April from the virus while in a nursing home.

A month later her mother Venita Griffin, 67, and great uncle Kenneth Dortch, 74, also died from Covid-19.

“My biggest fear in my entire life was losing my mother,” Griffin told NBC affiliate KSDK.

Venita Griffin, center, with her daughters Lawanda, left, and Erin. (Courtesy Erin Griffin)
Venita Griffin, center, with her daughters Lawanda, left, and Erin. (Courtesy Erin Griffin)

Griffin said she was diagnosed with an “upper respiratory” infection earlier this year, which resurged “at the same time when everybody came down with the really bad symptoms,” and suspects she contracted coronavirus while acting as caretaker for her family members.

Her sister, Lawanda Griffin, also contracted the virus and spent a month in a coma with Covid-19.

“My sister actually was in a coma at the time my mother passed, so she had to wake up to the news of my mother’s passing,” Griffin said.

Griffin’s 14-year-old son, 82-year-old grandmother and partner also contracted coronavirus and have since recovered.

Griffin explained Tuesday that her sister’s coma paralleled another family catastrophe.

In 2017, Lawanda Griffin became guardian to her granddaughter Deniya after the young girl was critically injured during a triple murder in which her parents were killed, as KSDK reported at the time.

“[Deniya] was in the hospital at the time we had the funeral for her mother and father, so she didn’t get the closure that she needed at seven years old,” Griffin explained.

Erin Griffin, right, with her sister Lawanda. (Courtesy Erin Griffin)
Erin Griffin, right, with her sister Lawanda. (Courtesy Erin Griffin)

As coronavirus resurges across the country, Griffin hopes that her family’s difficulties will convince more Americans will take it seriously: “This thing is real, and love your family, and don’t take your life for granted,” she said.

According to the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, there have been over 158,000 Covid-19 cases to date in the state and 2,590 deaths.

Source Article

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Allina to pull medical residents out of United Family Medicine clinic on St. Paul’s West Seventh



(Thinkstock)


© Provided by Twin Cities Pioneer Press
(Thinkstock)

For 50 years, the United Family Medicine clinic on St. Paul’s West Seventh Street has catered to the working poor and underinsured patients, including today many East African immigrants and neighborhood residents.

And the nonprofit health center has done so hand-in-hand with Allina Health, a 12-hospital, 90-clinic health network that has provided the majority of the clinic’s physicians, 21 medical residents, electronic records, lab services and even their phone line.

Now, Allina is in the process of pulling out all 21 medical residents and finding another location near United Hospital where the medical residents can complete their three-year rotations in family medicine.

By the end of the year, the faculty physicians are expected to follow them, leaving the clinic nearly devoid of primary care doctors. Physician assistants and nurse practitioners are expected to pick up the slack under the clinic’s new model of team-based care.

“The pandemic certainly has accelerated changes in the health care system,” said Sara Criger, president of United Hospital, who said medical residents and faculty had complained of patient scheduling and other issues at the clinic, hurting the reputation of Allina’s residency program.

Criger added: “There were problems that United Family Medicine needed to address. As the clinic made changes, we had to determine if they meet our requirements or not, and it became apparent that they did not.”

The deteriorating relationship between the community health clinic and Allina has led to finger-pointing on at least three sides.

CALLS FOR CEO TO RESIGN

Alarmed by a lengthy period of employee furloughs and other emergency management steps, a group of former United Family Medicine board members and West Seventh Street advocates have laid blame on the health clinic’s leadership and called for them to step down.

Those advocates include former United Family Medicine board chair Andrea Marboe, longtime West Seventh Street activist Marit Brock and former St. Paul City Council Member Dave Thune.

“We’ve totally lost confidence in the program and they should stop funding them,” said Thune, who is circulating a petition calling for major funders to sever ties and for United Family Medicine Chief Executive Officer Ann Nyakundi to resign.

“We want a neighborhood clinic with doctor-patient relationships, real family physicians that follow you to the hospital,” Thune said. “She walked in and six months later turned the clinic upside down. We just prefer she leave now.”

Nyakundi and Jonathan Watson, CEO of the Minnesota Association of Community Health Centers, said operations at the clinic have stabilized since the start of the pandemic.

“When I inherited the clinic, our 2020 budget at the start of the year was actually worse than it is now,” said Nayakundi, who stepped in as CEO last October after the previous CEO resigned. “We’ve done a really good job efficiently navigating the pandemic and staffing to demand. We temporarily had furloughs, but we’ve brought all of the staff back, and we’re actually in a period of growth.”

Critics, including former board

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