Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital wins prestigious award for “Building a Secure, Reliable and Smart 5G Hospital in Thailand”

Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital wins prestigious award for “Building a Secure, Reliable and Smart 5G Hospital in Thailand”

Prof. Dr. Prasit Watanapa (left), Dean of Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, receives the CommunicAsia Award from Mr. Sanchai Noombunnam (right), Deputy Managing Director of Informa Markets Thailand.

Prof. Dr. Prasit Watanapa, Dean of Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, received the CommunicAsia Awards 2020, in the “Most Innovative 5G Trial in APAC” category from Mr. Sanchai Noombunnam, Deputy Managing Director of Informa Markets Thailand, during the “5G Powered Smart Hospital Enabled with Cloud and AI” MoU signing ceremony between the Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital and Huawei Thailand.

The distinguished award celebrates the hospital’s achievement in integrating Huawei’s 5G+Cloud+AI COVID-19 diagnosis solution into the hospital’s operations to enhance the efficiency of coronavirus diagnosis and treatment throughout the pandemic. The solution significantly helps the medical staff shorten the wait time of COVID-19 results, while providing a high-speed connection with low latency during remote operations, thanks to the fifth-generation network. The cloud-based system also improved patients’ data collection and resource allocation. Huawei’s tailor-made solutions have proven effective in reducing the workload of medical personnel and helping the country better control the pandemic. 

The award celebrates a fruitful partnership between Siriraj Hospital and Huawei Thailand, under the “Building a Secure, Reliable and Smart 5G Hospital in Thailand” project, that resulted in a revolutionary COVID-19 diagnosis and treatment solution leveraging on the power of 5G, Cloud and AI technology.

The award also recognises the success of the “5G unmanned medicine delivery vehicle” pilot project, developed by Huawei in collaboration with the National Broadcasting and Telecommunications Commission (NBTC) and the Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital. The 5G driverless vehicle aims to reduce personnel contact, minimise infection risks, and improve drug delivery efficiency in the new medical era. 

“I am deeply honoured to receive this award on behalf of the hospital. At Siriraj, we always look for ways to improve efficiency of medical services and operations,” said Prof. Dr. Prasit Watanapa during his acceptance speech. “I would like to thank Huawei for its continuous support in helping us realise our vision for a 5G smart hospital. We will continue to jointly explore new opportunities in the 5G healthcare field. Together we will bring reliable and efficient medical services to the Thai people.”

“This is a proud moment for the Hospital, and we are delighted to have contributed to this honour,” said Huawei Thailand CEO Mr. Abel Deng. “It is Huawei’s mission to accompany Thailand as it develops a strong, connected healthcare ecosystem through 5G and other advanced technologies and solutions.”

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Stanford faculty demand university sanctions for Trump adviser and faculty member Scott Atlas

Scott Atlas; Donald Trump
Scott Atlas; Donald Trump

US President Donald Trump (L) listens to White House coronavirus adviser Dr. Scott Atlas speak during a press conference in the Brady Briefing Room of the White House on September 23, 2020, in Washington, DC. MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images

This article originally appeared here on Salon.com

Scott Atlas, one of President Trump’s special coronavirus advisers and a faculty member at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution in Palo Alto, Calif., is causing a minor fracas among students and faculty at the elite university. Specifically, Atlas’ recommendations on coronavirus public health measures fly in the face of scientific consensus, faculty says — a charge that Atlas denies, and which he has threatened litigation over.  

During a Faculty Senate meeting at Stanford University late last month, the college’s president and provost were asked whether Dr. Scott Atlas should face university sanctions for positions he has taken about the novel coronavirus pandemic that go against the scientific consensus. (As the faculty noted, Atlas is a neuroradiologist, not an epidemiologist or a scholar of infectious disease.) At the meeting, similar questions were raised about the university’s relationship with the Hoover Institution, where Atlas is a senior fellow. The Hoover Institution is a conservative think tank located on Stanford’s campus that has supported a laundry list of prominent right-wing statesmen over the years, from Condoleezza Rice to Reagan Secretary of State George Shultz. 

Unsurprisingly given the politics of his employer, Atlas’ public statements tend to delight conservatives and alarm scientists who study public health and infectious diseases. Atlas recently tweeted that masks do not work to prevent infection (an unsupported claim, and one which Twitter wound up taking down for being misleading); previously, he claimed publicly that the threat of the coronavirus is greatly exaggerated. Atlas also claimed that summer civil rights protests were to blame for coronavirus outbreaks, as well as proximity to the U.S.-Mexico border, two more claims for which there is no evidence.

Despite being described by Trump as “one of the great experts of the world,” Atlas is reported to not have expertise in infectious disease mitigation or public health. Most recently, Atlas raised eyebrows last week for appearing on Russian state broadcaster RT, which is registered with the Justice Department as an agent of the Russian government.

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David Spiegel, a medicine professor and associate chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, claimed during the late October meeting (which occurred before the RT interview) that Atlas is the “latest member of the Hoover Institution to disseminate incorrect and unscientific information about the coronavirus pandemic,” according to Stanford News. He also accused Atlas of violating the American Medical Association’s Code of Ethics and claimed that he may have additionally violated Stanford’s Code of Conduct.

University President Marc Tessier-Lavigne responded by citing the college’s Statement on Academic Freedom, although the provost acknowledged the validity of engineering professor Stephen Monismith’s concern about a New York Times report that some of Trump’s senior economic advisers had

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Five Penn Faculty Members Elected to The National Academy of Medicine


Five faculty members from The University of Pennsylvania have been elected to the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) — one of the nation’s highest honors in the fields of health and medicine.

Dr. William Beltran of the school of veterinary medicine; Dr. Matthew McHugh of the school of nursing, and Drs. Ronald DeMatteo, Raina Merchant, and Hongjun Song of the Perelman School of Medicine are among the 100 new members, who have made major contributions to the advancement of the medical sciences, health care, and public health.

 

 

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Faculty voice: What is osteopathic medicine? A D.O. explains | MSUToday

MSU’s Andrea Amalfitano, dean of MSU’s College of Osteopathic Medicine and and Heritage Foundation Endowed Professor of Pediatrics, Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, wrote this piece for The Conversation, an independent collaboration between editors and academics that provides informed news analysis and commentary to the general public. See the entire list of articles written by MSU faculty for the conversation.

 

Andrea Amalfitano is a doctor of osteopathic medicine, or D.O., and dean of the College of Osteopathic Medicine. He explains some of the foundations of the profession and its guiding principle: to use holistic approaches to care for and guide patients. And don’t worry, yes, D.O.s are “real doctors” and have full practice rights across the U.S.

 

When President Trump was diagnosed with COVID-19, many Americans noticed that his physician had the title D.O. stitched onto his white coat. Much confusion ensued about doctors of osteopathic medicine. As of a 2018 census, they made up 9.1% of physicians in the United States. How do they fit into the broader medical field?

 

How did osteopathic medicine get started?

 

In the years after the Civil War, without antibiotics and vaccines, many clinicians of the day relied on techniques like arsenic, castor oil, mercury and bloodletting to treat the ill. Unsanitary surgical practices were standard. These “treatments” promised cures but often led to more sickness and pain.

 

In response to that dreadful state of affairs, a group of American physicians founded the osteopathic medical profession. They asserted that maintaining wellness and preventing disease was paramount. They believed that preserving health was best achieved via a holistic medical understanding of the individual patients, their families and their communities in mind, body and spirit. They rejected reductionist interactions meant to rapidly address only acute symptoms or problems.

 

They also embraced the concept that the human body has an inherent capacity to heal itself — decades before the immune system’s complexities were understood — and called for this ability to be respected and harnessed.

 

What do osteopathic doctors do today?

 

Doctors of osteopathic medicine — D.O.s, for short – can prescribe medication and practice all medical and surgical specialties just as their M.D. counterparts do. Because of the focus on preserving wellness rather than waiting to treat symptoms as they arise, more than half of D.O.s gravitate to primary care, including family practice and pediatrics, particularly in rural and underserved areas.


Andrea Amalfitano

Andrea Amalfitano, dean of the College of Osteopathic Medicine and Osteopathic Heritage Foundation Endowed Professor of Pediatrics, Microbiology and Molecular Genetics.

 

D.O. training embraces the logic that understanding anatomic structures can allow one to better understand how they function. For example, alongside contemporary medical and surgical preventive and treatment knowledge, all osteopathic physicians also learn strategies to treat musculoskeletal pain and disease. These techniques are known as “manual medicine,” or osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT). They can provide patients an alternative to medications, including opioids, or invasive surgical interventions.

 

D.O.s pride themselves on making sure their patients feel they’re treated as a whole person

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Two Yale faculty elected to National Academy of Medicine

Yale’s Michelle Bell and Daniel Colón-Ramos were among 100 new members elected to the National Academy of Medicine, the academy announced Oct. 19.

Bell, the Mary E. Pinchot Professor of Environmental Health at the Yale School of the Environment (YSE), was elected for her research which focuses on how human health is affected by environmental conditions, including air pollution, weather, and climate change. She also examines environmental justice.

In recognition of her work, Bell has received the Prince Albert II de Monaco/Institut Pasteur Award, the Rosenblith New Investigator Award, and the NIH Outstanding New Environmental Scientist (ONES) Award.

Colón-Ramos, the McConnell Duberg Professor of Neuroscience and Cell Biology in the department of neuroscience, was recognized “for making fundamental discoveries regarding the cell biology of the synapse,’’ the academy wrote.  His lab focuses on how neuronal synapses are formed and maintained to control behavior and store memories. 

Colón-Ramos was a recipient of the 2018 National Institutes of Health Pioneer Award, the 2018 Landis Award for Outstanding Mentorship from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, the American Association for the Advancement of Science Early Career Award, and the Sloan Research Fellowship. 

Established originally as the Institute of Medicine in 1970 by the National Academy of Sciences, the U.S. National Academy of Medicine addresses critical issues in health, science, medicine, and related policy and inspires positive actions across sectors. NAM works alongside the National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Engineering to provide independent, objective analysis and advice to the nation and conduct other activities to solve complex problems and inform public policy decisions. 

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4 UCSF Faculty Elected to the National Academy of Medicine for 2020

Four UC San Francisco faculty members are among the 100 new national and international members elected this year to the National Academy of Medicine (NAM), one of the highest honors in the fields of health of medicine.

Membership in the NAM recognizes individuals who have demonstrated outstanding professional achievements and commitment to service in the medical sciences, health care and public health.

“This distinguished and diverse class of new members is a truly exceptional group of scholars and leaders whose expertise in science, medicine, health, and policy will be integral to helping the NAM address today’s most pressing health challenges and inform the future of health and health care for the benefit of everyone around the globe,” National Academy of Medicine President Victor J. Dzau said in a press release. “It is my privilege to welcome these esteemed individuals to the National Academy of Medicine.”

This year, this distinguished group welcomes four UCSF faculty:

  • Mark Anderson, MD, PhD, professor of medicine and Robert B. Friend and Michelle M. Friend Endowed Chair in Diabetes Research
  • Edward Chang, MD, Jeanne Robertson Distinguished Professor and Joan and Sandy Weill Chair of the Department of Neurological Surgery
  • Aleksandar Rajkovic, MD, PhD, Stuart Lindsay Distinguished Professor in Experimental Pathology and Chief Genomics Officer of UCSF Health
  • Robert Wachter, MD, Holly Smith Distinguished Professor in Science and Medicine, Benioff Endowed Chair in Hospital Medicine, and chair of the Department of Medicine
Mark Anderson portrait

Mark Anderson, MD, PhD

Anderson is a physician-scientist who cares for patients with autoimmune endocrine diseases such as type 1 diabetes. This focus extends into the lab, where his research examines the genetic control of autoimmune diseases to better understand the mechanisms by which immune tolerance is broken.

In particular, his lab is interested in how the thymus trains the immune system to distinguish proteins made by the body itself from proteins made by invasive pathogens. For example, they have shown that some thymus cells produce “self” proteins and others even differentiate into skin or gut cells to test newborn T cells for autoimmune tendencies. Understanding these mechanisms could one day lead to medical interventions that suppress or enhance immune activity.

Anderson is a member of the UCSF Diabetes Center and the UCSF Bakar ImmunoX Initiative, director of the UCSF Medical Scientist Training Program, and current president of the Federation of Clinical Immunology.

Edward Chang smiling.

Edward Chang, MD

Chang is a neurosurgeon-scientist and chair of the Department of Neurological Surgery. He specializes in advanced brain mapping methods to preserve crucial areas for language and cognitive functions in the brain. Chang is a member of the UCSF Weill Institute for Neurosciences and co-director of the Center for Neural Engineering and Prostheses, a collaboration between UCSF and UC Berkeley.

Chang’s research focuses on the brain mechanisms for human behaviors such as speech and mood. For example, by studying the brain activity associated with the physical movements of speaking, his team was able to teach a computer to decode and transform these brain signals into synthetic speech. This technology has

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Five Penn faculty elected to the National Academy of Medicine

Five faculty members from Penn have been elected to the National Academy of Medicine (NAM), one of the nation’s highest honors in the fields of health and medicine. William Beltran of the School of Veterinary Medicine, Matthew McHugh of the School of Nursing, and Ronald DeMatteo, Raina Merchant, and Hongjun Song of the Perelman School of Medicine are among the 100 new members, elected by current NAM members.

Election recognizes individuals who have made major contributions to the advancement of the medical sciences, health care, and public health.

William Beltran is professor of ophthalmology in the Department of Clinical Sciences and Advanced Medicine and director of the Division of Experimental Retinal Therapies at Penn Vet. His research focuses on inherited retinal degeneration, a major cause of blindness in dogs and humans worldwide. Specifically, he has investigated the signaling pathways affected by X-linked retinitis pigmentosa and autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa, two of the most common forms of inherited retinal degeneration in humans. Working in canines, who suffer from forms of retinal degeneration that closely mimic the human diseases, he has helped develop effective gene therapies with promising results for treating both early- and late-stage disease.

Ronald Paul DeMatteo is the John Rhea Barton Professor and chair in the Perelman School of Medicine’s Department of Surgery. DeMatteo served as principal investigator on three national trials for the adjuvant drug imatinib for gastrointestinal stromal tumor, the most common human sarcoma. His work led to imatinib’s approval for adjuvant use by the FDA and established the standard-of-care for GIST, combining surgery and imatinib. DeMatteo is also being recognized for his work to define the immune response to GIST and its modulation by targeted therapy.

Matthew McHugh is the Independence Chair for Nursing Education and professor of nursing at Penn Nursing, associate director of the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research (CHOPR), and senior fellow of the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics. As principal investigator on multiple large-scale studies funded by the National Institutes of Health, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, McHugh’s work has advanced the field of nursing outcomes and policy research by showing the value of investing in nursing to achieve a higher functioning health care system. In addition to findings from direct evaluations of nurse staffing ratio laws, research from McHugh and colleagues from the CHOPR at Penn Nursing has informed legislation proposed in multiple states and countries on safe nurse-staffing levels.

Raina Merchant is associate vice president and director of the Center for Digital Health in Penn Medicine and associate professor of emergency medicine in the Perelman School of Medicine. Merchant’s work has sought to gain insights through digital media about important health trends, and she is recognized for developing, deploying, evaluating, and refining novel tools and techniques to promote individual and population health. Some of her projects in this arena include tracking both physical and mental health symptoms via Twitter during the COVID-19 pandemic, determining keywords and phrases that could be used

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National Academy of Medicine Elects 9 HMS Faculty Members

Nine HMS faculty members are among 100 new members elected by the National Academy of Medicine. Considered one of the highest honors among scientists, engineers and health professionals, NAM membership recognizes individuals who have demonstrated commitment to service and outstanding professional achievement in the advancement of science, medicine, technology and health.

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Below are the new NAM regular members and their election citations:

Dan Barouch, the HMS William Bosworth Castle Professor of Medicine and director of the Center for Virology and Vaccine Research at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

For being an international leader in virology and immunology and developing novel vaccines and cure strategies for viruses of global importance, including working on one of the first COVID-19 vaccine candidates, the first Zika virus vaccine and the first global mosaic HIV-1 vaccine, as well as defining immunotherapeutic HIV-1 cure strategies.

Myles Brown, the HMS Emil Frei III Professor of Medicine and director of the Center for Functional Cancer Epigenetics at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

For his leadership in oncology and endocrinology, whose seminal contributions have fundamentally reformulated the mechanistic understanding of hormone dependence of breast and prostate cancers, enabling the development of new therapies for these diseases.

Yolonda Lorig Colson, the  HMS Hermes C. Grillo Professor of Surgery in the Field of Thoracic Surgery and chief of the Division of Thoracic Surgery at Massachusetts General Hospital.

For contributions to the fields of thoracic surgery, polymer-mediated chemotherapy release and lymphatic drug delivery and for leading a national paradigm shift to improve maintenance of certification for surgeons.

Merit Cudkowicz, the HMS Julieanne Dorn Professor of Neurology and chief of Department of Neurology and director of the Sean M. Healey and AMG Center for ALS at Mass General.

For leading the first neuroscience antisense oligonucleotide therapy trial; establishing the first platform trial in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; helping to develop a successful treatment for sporadic ALS, AMX0035; and creating global networks to accelerate treatment development for many disorders.

David E. Fisher, the HMS Edward Wigglesworth Professor of Dermatology and chief of the Department of Dermatology at Mass General.

For elucidating the ultraviolet pigmentation pathway, UV-seeking endorphin response, skin cancer prevention strategies, and hair graying mechanism; discovering melanoma and sarcoma oncogenes; and developing a routinely used melanoma diagnostic.

Joel Hirschhorn, the HMS Concordia Professor of Pediatrics and professor of genetics and chief of the Division of Endocrinology at Boston Children’s Hospital and member of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard.

For his development of methods and standards for performing and interpreting genome-wide association studies. He leads the Genetic Investigation of ANthropometric Traits (GIANT) consortium, which identified most currently known loci associated with stature and obesity.

Aaron Kesselheim, HMS professor of medicine and faculty member of the Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics in the Department of Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

For his national leadership in studying how prescription drugs and medical devices interact with regulatory practices and the law to affect patient health

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Pierre Et Marie Curie Faculty Of Medicine

Operation Stroll strives to increase the good quality of life for impoverished patients by way of the direct and indirect delivery of orthopedic wellness care. The faculty of medicine gives courses for the 3 cycles of health-related studies: from PCEM1 (given within the faculty) to the 3rd cycle such as DES (Diploma in Specialised Research in Medicine), DESC (Diploma of Complementary Specialised Studies), DU (University Diploma) and DIU (Inter University Diploma).

In the physiology of the iris of the eye we see that sympathetic nerve stimulation causes tiny muscle tissues to dilate the pupil to allow in adequate light, although simultaneously parasympathetic excitation constricts the pupil to maintain excess light out.

A single of the main motives for this is that as opposed to American citizens, internationals are not eligible for federal monetary aid or loans, and so most frequently, they require to offer their own funding for the complete duration of their studies – and occasionally they even require to prove that they have enough cash (up to total of around $200,000) on their account at the time of their admission.

Each the Magdalene laundries and the mother-infant residence in Tuam were in Ireland, which was possibly extreme in the poverty, ignorance, and quick ties to the Roman Catholic Church, but the treatment of females in England and the US had been also inexcusably harsh.

We knew, and every day had reinforced, that our very best efforts could not make up for the influence of poverty and discrimination that in spite of the fact that the hospital did not charge individuals, even for outpatient medications (although they had to wait hours for their prescriptions to be filled) the obstacles to their overall health had been massive.…

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Faculty Of Dentistry

Our Dentistry BDS programme combines the extremely most current considering in dental education with early clinical expertise. Amalgam has been about for more than 150 years, and it’s been controversial ever because its initial use in dentistry. Make contact with our workplace to schedule an appointment. Some of my sufferers do seem to break a number of their teeth. Le passage de la 1ère à la 2e année est subordonné à la réussite d’un concours très sélectif (numerus clausus fixé à 1199 places en 2017).

Par ailleurs, la CARCDSF révèle que les dentistes de moins de 35 ans ont un revenu de 33 % inférieur à la moyenne. Le dentiste Jacques Ménard ouvre sa première clinique en 1986 sur la rue Parent, à Saint-Jérôme. Dre Grenier a développé durant ses 15 années de pratique une experience en dentisterie esthétique , restauration sur implant et soins des gencives (greffe).

Formulate plan of therapy for patient’s teeth and mouth tissue. Prosthodontics (also known as prosthetic dentistry) – Dentures , bridges and the restoration of implants. When finances are attached to healthy patient outcomes, dental care teams will attach an even higher worth to dental hygienists.

Frequently the teeth that break have fillings that undermine the current tooth structure. You can filter this report by date, provider, individuals and also regardless of whether they have remaining dental positive aspects. Automobile ne le nions pas on est un peu en mode berger dans cette maisonnette bien rustique.

Doctors, dentists and lawyers stood alongside building workers and street sweepers, handing buckets of debris or chunks of concrete hand-to-hand down the line. Their mission is to light up billions of smiles across India, making it glow on the planet map as a nation free of dental difficulties and discomfort.…

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