Health specialists question Pence campaigning as essential work

Health policy specialists questioned White House officials’ claim that federal rules on essential workers allow Vice President Mike Pence to continue to campaign and not quarantine himself after being exposed to the coronavirus.

Campaigning is not an official duty that might fall under the guidelines meant to ensure that police, first responders, and key transportation and food workers can still perform jobs that cannot be done remotely, the health specialists said.

A Pence aide said Sunday that the vice president would continue to work and travel, including for campaigning, after his chief of staff and some other close contacts tested positive. Pence tested negative on Sunday and decided to keep traveling after consulting White House medical personnel, his aides said.

Pence’s chief of staff, Marc Short, was among those who tested positive. President Trump, said early Sunday that Short was quarantining.

That usually means isolating oneself for 14 days after exposure in case an infection is developing, to prevent spreading the virus to others.

Pence was holding a rally Sunday in North Carolina, events in Minnesota and Pennsylvania on Monday, and more events in North Carolina and South Carolina on Tuesday. The most recent numbers show COVID-19 cases are rising in 75 percent of the country.

On Sunday, National Security Adviser Robert O’Brien told reporters that Pence “is following all the rules” from federal health officials. He called Pence “an essential worker” and said, “essential workers going out and campaigning and voting are about as essential as things we can do as Americans.”

However, the guidelines on essential workers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are aimed at folks like police, first responders, and key transportation and food workers.

The Department of Homeland Security spells out 16 categories of critical infrastructure workers, including those at military bases, nuclear power sites, courthouses, and public works facilities like dams and water plants.

“I don’t see campaigning on the list,” said Dr. Joshua Sharfstein, vice dean for public health practice at Johns Hopkins University and former Maryland state Health Department chief. “Anything that does not have to be done in person and anything not related to his job as vice president would not be considered essential.”

Dr. Thomas Tsai, a health policy specialist at Harvard University, agreed.

Helping to maintain the function of the executive branch of government could be considered critical work, but “we’ve always historically separated campaigning from official duties,” he said.

Pence also serves as president of the Senate, a largely ceremonial role outlined in the Constitution but one that stands to come into focus Monday.

The Senate was expected to vote Monday evening to confirm Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett. Pence’s vote is unlikely to be needed to break a tie, but his presence was expected for the vote.

If Pence’s official work as vice president was considered essential, the CDC guidelines say he should be closely monitored for COVID-19 symptoms, stay at least 6 feet from others, and wear a mask “at all times

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Health experts question Pence campaigning as essential work

Health policy specialists are questioning Vice President Mike Pence’s claim that federal rules on essential workers allow him to continue to campaign and not quarantine himself after exposure to multiple close staffers with COVID-19

Campaigning is not an official duty that might fall under the guidelines meant to ensure that police, first responders and key transportation and food workers can still perform jobs that cannot be done remotely, the health experts said.

A Pence aide said Sunday that the vice president would continue to work and travel, including for campaigning, after his chief of staff and some other close contacts tested positive. Pence tested negative on Sunday and decided to keep traveling after consulting White House medical personnel, his aides said.

Pence’s chief of staff, Marc Short, was among those who tested positive. President Donald Trump, said early Sunday that Short was quarantining.

That usually means isolating oneself for 14 days after exposure in case an infection is developing, to prevent spreading the virus to others.

Pence was holding a rally Sunday in North Carolina, another one in Minnesota on Monday and three events in North Carolina and South Carolina on Tuesday. The most recent numbers show COVID-19 cases are rising in 75% of the country.

On Sunday, National Security Advisor Robert O’Brien told reporters that Pence “is following all the rules” from federal health officials. He called Pence “an essential worker” and said, “essential workers going out and campaigning and voting are about as essential as things we can do as Americans.”

However, the guidelines on essential workers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are aimed at folks like police, first responders and key transportation and food workers.

The Department of Homeland Security spells out 16 categories of critical infrastructure workers, including those at military bases, nuclear power sites, courthouses and public works facilities like dams and water plants.

“I don’t see campaigning on the list,” said Dr. Joshua Sharfstein, vice dean for public health practice at Johns Hopkins University and former Maryland state health department chief. “Anything that does not have to be done in person and anything not related to his job as vice president would not be considered essential.”

Dr. Thomas Tsai, a health policy specialist at Harvard University, agreed.

Helping to maintain the function of the executive branch of government could be considered critical work, but “we’ve always historically separated campaigning from official duties,” he said.

Pence also serves as president of the Senate, a largely ceremonial role outlined in the Constitution but one that stands to come into focus Monday.

The Senate was expected to vote Monday evening to confirm Trump’s Supreme Court

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A Brief on the Use of Essential Oils With Traditional Chinese Medicine

The use of essential oils based on Chinese medicine has proven to be an exceptional modality in gaining maximum results with clients. This ancient healing system naturally adopts the use of essential oils.

This case study will give the reader an overview of how to work with the Spleen and Stomach (Earth Element).

Two of the major pathogenic factors in Chinese medicine are Damp and Cold. These influences cause stagnation of Qi. In short, when there is stagnant qi the energy does not flow properly and the body will experience signs and symptoms that mirror this.

According to Chinese medicine a primary function of the Earth element (Spleen and Stomach) is to transform and transport postnatal qi. Our postnatal qi is associated with diet, which includes what we absorb from our environment. (Gian 2015) (1) TCM physiology states, that the Spleen ascends the pure postnatal qi and the stomach descends the impure. So, if the Qi is deficient the Spleen will not be able to do its proper job and this causes stagnation. A cardinal sign of Spleen Qi Deficiency and Stagnation is flatulence. This was the case with one of the clients, a 35 year old woman.

The below case study illustrates the healing protocols in dealing with flatulence as a symptom of Spleen Qi Deficiency accompanied by the secondary complaint of low libido.

A client had the chief complaint of excessive flatulence that worsened with cold and damp weather. Her flatulence was hard to control, and made her feel embarrassed when she was not home. The frequency could be high, as in 1 to 2 minutes per time for 10 minutes. It further complicated the condition when she drank black tea, green tea, coffee, iced tea – both hot and cold.

To a great extent, the healing protocols were done within a TCM context. I successfully treated the symptoms with the blend below:

2 drops of Ginger (Zingiber officinale)

1 drop of Cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum)

1 drop of Spike Lavender (Lavandula latifolia)

1 drop of Clary Sage (Salvia sclarea)

1 drop of Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) 10 ml Olive Oil

Ginger is carminative, which can help to prevent gas. It can also warm the body and improve the circulation. The high ester content is beneficial to prevent gas. It is warming, so it can help improve circulation and bring the Qi upwards. It aids digestion and tones the body. I added Spike Lavender for the purpose of removing dampness from the lungs. Clary sage is a very calming oil which can calm the CNS. It helps to relieve the stress and anxiety of my client. Additionally, it can stimulate the immune system – which can bring the body back to normal. Lavender is a calming oil which can help ease the digestive tension (which could be a leading cause to the gas emission problem of the client).

Ginger is a warming oil that assists in strengthening the Spleen and warms the Kidneys. Ginger is integral for two reasons, one …

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Visiting a Pediatric Dentist Is Essential to Keeping Your Child's Teeth Healthy

Keeping a child's teeth clean (even baby teeth) is vital to improving his or her overall health and ensuring proper growth and development. Encouraging healthy habits, such as regular brushing and flossing, as well as proper nutrition, will go a long way in keeping a child's teeth healthy. Beyond day-to-day care, scheduling regular visits to a pediatric dentist is essential in preventing infection, disease, and identifying any potential problems in a child's mouth. Following these three essential steps will help to keep a child's teeth healthy.

1. Regular Brushing and Flossing

For adults, regular brushing and flossing might seem like a no-brainer, but for many kids, brushing and flossing can seem like a chore that they would rather avoid. To help introduce a child to regular brushing, it is best to start when he or she is two years old. Early on, take care to only use a small amount of toothpaste (about an eighth of what an adult would typically use). As many young children will swallow toothpaste and not spit it out, it's best to use a fluoride-free toothpaste until a child is old enough to stop swallowing it. At some point, kids will want to brush their own teeth – it's okay to let them, but be sure to give their teeth an extra brush once they've had their turn. Most children won't get into the habit of regularly giving their teeth a proper brush until age 8 or 9.

It is best to start to start flossing between a child's teeth as soon as his or her teeth touch each other. Floss once a day or as needed with either regular string floss or plastic floss picks. Eventually, repeated proper instruction will enable kids to start flossing on their own. Let them try a few times under supervision, and be sure to reward them for a job well done to encourage continued thorough flossing.

2. Proper Nutrition

Maintaining proper nutrition for a child is vital in keeping his or her teeth healthy and preventing decay. Frequent snacking of unhealthy foods can increase a child's risk of tooth decay. Foods high in sugar can cause cavities if they are left on a child's teeth for too long. Bacteria eat the sugar left on teeth and create acid, which dissolves enamel. To avoid this, try to limit a child's intake of sugar-high foods and lengthen the intervals between snacks.

3. Routine Visits to A Pediatric Dentist

In order to ensure that a child's teeth remain healthy and develop properly, it is essential to schedule routine visits to a trusted pediatric dentist. Pediatric dental professionals can find and treat early signs and symptoms of infection and structural abnormalities and can provide parents with further information on proper tooth care for their children. Pediatric dental professionals can also provide information and advice on early orthodontics as needed.

Following these three steps will ensure your children are on the right track for proper oral health.

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