Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center Awarded 5-Star Hospital Award by Patient Safety Movement Foundation for Efforts to Eliminate Preventable Deaths

The Patient Safety Movement Foundation presented Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center (DHMC) with the Foundation’s 5-Star Hospital award for making commitments in alignment with the Patient Safety Movement Foundation’s evidence-based Actionable Patient Safety Solutions (APSS). The APSS addresses patient safety challenges that hospitals are facing daily and offer solutions designed to help hospitals eliminate preventable patient deaths.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201028005223/en/

The Patient Safety Movement Foundation presented the award virtually to Dartmouth-Hitchcock’s (from left to right): Associate Chief Quality Officer, Quality Assurance & Safety, Lori B. Key, MBA, RN, and Chief Quality & Value Officer, George T. Blike, MD, MHCDS (Photo: Business Wire)

“Each year, more than 200,000 patients die from preventable hospital errors in the U.S., and 4.8 million across the globe. Those numbers are simply not acceptable and unthinkable,” said David Mayer, MD, Patient Safety Movement Foundation CEO. “Our 5-Star Award acknowledges the commitment these organizations have made toward achieving ZERO preventable deaths. The leadership demonstrated by these leaders is a model others can follow in instituting best practices in patient care.”

Mayer virtually presented the award to Dartmouth-Hitchcock’s Associate Chief Quality Officer, Quality Assurance & Safety, Lori B. Key, MBA, RN, and Chief Quality & Value Officer, George T. Blike, MD, MHCDS. You can view the presentation here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yevVBFjc-3M&feature=youtu.be

This award is a result of the collective work of DHMC employees and leaders who adopted the principles of high reliability and demonstrate those behaviors by establishing safety behaviors, reporting opportunities to improve systems and processes, and by providing individual expertise in designing and implementing quality and safety improvements.

“We’re very honored to receive this award and very pleased to be part of this movement and committed to a group that has the philosophy of ‘all teach, all learn and all improving’ when it comes to patient safety,” said Blike. “The spirit of sharing, learning, growth and improvement is what we value as an organization.”

More than 4,793 hospitals across 48 countries have committed to implementing one or multiple of the APSS developed by the Patient Safety Movement Foundation workgroups. For more information about the 5-Star Hospital program, please visit:

https://patientsafetymovement.org/partners/5-star-hospital-program/

About Dartmouth-Hitchcock Health: DARTMOUTH-HITCHCOCK HEALTH (D-HH), New Hampshire’s only academic health system and the state’s largest private employer, serves a population of 1.9 million across northern New England. D-H provides access to more than 2,000 providers in almost every area of medicine, delivering care at its flagship hospital, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center (DHMC) in Lebanon, NH. DHMC was named again in 2020 as the #1 hospital in New Hampshire by U.S. News & World Report, and recognized for high performance in 9 clinical specialties and procedures. Dartmouth-Hitchcock also includes the Norris Cotton Cancer Center, one of only 51 NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers in the nation; the Children’s Hospital at Dartmouth-Hitchcock, the state’s only children’s hospital; affiliated member hospitals in Lebanon, Keene, and New London, NH, and Windsor, VT, and Visiting Nurse and Hospice for Vermont and New Hampshire; and 24 Dartmouth-Hitchcock

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Schenectady practice helping to eliminate nerve pain

SCHENECTADY — Cyndie Powell loves to cook.

But her lower back pain and sciatica were so bad that she had to sit on a stool in her kitchen in order to cook. She couldn’t stand the pain from standing after just five minutes.

Powell, a resident of Schuylerville who works as a program manager and financial consultant for 1st Scotia Wealth Management, tried everything to dull the pain.

She tried over-the-counter pain relievers and massage. She visited a chiropractor. And she didn’t want to get surgery.

“Nothing really ever made the pain go away,” Powell said.

Until she met Laura Brown, a physical therapist and massage therapist in Schenectady who earlier this year invested in buying and getting trained to operate a electrical stimulation, or eSTIM, medical device made by a company called Calmare.

The machine has the ability to target five separate parts of the body by sending electronic pulses that “reset” the nerves, making them essentially forget the pain. The device can help with fibromyalgia, migraines, sciatica, neuropathy and what is known as Complex Regional Pain Syndrome.


Brown’s business is known as Capital Region Calmare. She operates the only licensed Calmare facility in the local area. Until now, patients who wanted to try the technology would have to travel to Stony Brook on Long Island. Brown has continued to operate her massage business as well.

“I’ve seen firsthand the extraordinary pain relief it’s provided to individuals who have tried traditional treatments, sometimes for years, without success,” Brown said, “There is no better feeling than giving someone his or her life back by re-introducing them to a world without pain, and to do so without any side effects, drugs or surgical procedures is a huge benefit.”

The treatment by the device is not covered by insurance, although some of the physical therapy done as part of the treatment is. The initial session when Brown evaluates a patient costs $100, while each subsequent session costs $250, although Brown offers 10 treatments at a discount for $2,000.

Powell, who has been working from home during the pandemic but travels an hour for treatments, said she got relief after each treatment. The pain would come back to a degree after each one.

But after four sessions, Powell said the pain went away for good. And there was no pain or side effects. She says the electronic therapy is a great alternative to opioids that are often prescribed for back pain. Patients often need more than four sessions.

“It was like a miracle,” Powell said.

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