Election day freebies and deals from Krispy Kreme, McDonald’s, Planet Fitness and more

Free food and discounts are up for grabs this Election Day regardless of whether you have an “I Voted” sticker.

Krispy Kreme is giving away glazed doughnuts to all along with a special voting sticker while supplies last Tuesday. Planet Fitness is offering a way to work off the stress of the election with a free workout and massage Tuesday through Nov. 8.

With more mail-in ballots and early voting this year, fewer people will have the “I Voted” stickers as proof to show they voted. According to federal law, it technically is illegal to offer freebies in exchange for votes and businesses typically skirt this by offering the deals to all.

Election Day also is National Sandwich Day and several restaurants are offering discounts and specials on subs Tuesday.

Planet Fitness is offering a way to work off the stress of the election with a free workout and massage Tuesday through Nov. 8.

Planet Fitness is offering a way to work off the stress of the election with a free workout and massage Tuesday through Nov. 8.
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Free and discounted rides to the polls

A popular Election Day discount is a ride to the polls. Aside from ride-sharing apps offering deals, several cities and communities are providing free rides on Election Day including Los Angeles and Indianapolis, Indiana. Check with your local transit system to see if they have an offer.

Lyft: Get 50% off one ride up to $10 Tuesday to any polling location or dropbox using the code 2020VOTE. Lyft also is including its network of bikes and scooters in select cities in this offer.

The North American Bikeshare Association: The association’s Roll to the Polls industry-wide campaign offers ”free or reduced-cost transportation to voters” Tuesday. Learn more here.

Uber: Get 50% off roundtrip rides to the polls, up to $7 each way or up to $14 for the two trips. Uber says the discounts will be “automatically applied when you request your ride by using the polling finder,” which is an in-app feature. Terms and conditions apply and this offer is not available in California and Michigan.

Election Day freebies and deals

Here are the deals available Tuesday at participating locations unless otherwise noted. To be on the safe side, check with your closest location before heading out.

Boston Market: From 9 p.m. to close at all locations nationwide Tuesday, get one free slider. No purchase is necessary. The new sliders — including Chicken Cheddar, Turkey Cheddar, Chicken Chipotle and BBQ Meatloaf — are part of Boston Market’s new Late Night menu.

Chili’s: Through Election Day, get the Presidente Margarita for $5 and a free commemorative sticker while supplies last. Chili’s also is hosting a contest. Learn more at www.chilis.com.

DoorDash: The on-demand delivery app will have free delivery on all orders with a $15 minimum placed on Election Day with promo code VOTE. For DashPass subscribers that already have zero delivery fees on orders over $12, DoorDash is providing 10% off orders with code DPVOTE. The codes should be entered at checkout.

Grubhub: The on-demand app will have more than 30

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Unlike previous lethal viruses, this one will define a major election

From a single case in Snohomish County, Wash., on Jan. 21, the coronavirus has mushroomed in less than 10 months to a widening scourge currently infecting nearly 100,000 Americans a day. As Election Day voters prepared to cast their ballots Tuesday, the medical examiner in El Paso was adding a fourth refrigerated “mobile morgue,” and hospitals in northwest Wisconsin were canceling elective procedures to save beds for patients with covid-19, the disease caused by the virus.

Two-thirds of the public now personally know one of the 9.25 million people who have tested positive for the virus — a new high — polls show. And even more think the worst of the pandemic is yet to come.

“We’ve never had an Election Day in the fog of a pandemic like this,” said Howard Markel, a medical historian at the University of Michigan. “It will, perhaps, be called the pandemic election.”

How those factors affect turnout and results won’t be known until evening, and perhaps not for days or weeks to come. But it is already clear that Tuesday will mark a singular modern-day confluence of a U.S. public health crisis and the election of a president.

“To my knowledge, it’s unprecedented,” said Harvey V. Fineberg, president of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and co-author of “The Epidemic That Never Was,” an analysis of the federal swine flu immunization program in 1976. “Which means one has no basis for comparison.”

In the 1920 presidential election, voters faced a waning threat from the pandemic flu, there was no flu vaccine, and public health was seen as a local issue that did not merit intervention by the president. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention did not exist. Even during the 1918 off-year election, the pathogen that would eventually kill 675,000 Americans was not a major subject of debate, Markel said.

Periodic flu outbreaks during ensuing decades did not move the political needle much either.

The worst polio outbreaks, in the 1940s and early 1950s, tended to wane as the weather cooled, and the virus was eventually quelled by successful testing of a vaccine in 1955.

Even HIV, which drove activists into the streets, had little impact at election time, at least during the epidemic’s first decade. President Ronald Reagan, who took office in 1981, the year the virus was first recognized, famously would not utter the word “AIDS” until 1987.

Tuesday will be much different.

“I have no idea what it will do in terms of turnout,” said Tom Inglesby, director of the Center for Health Security at the Bloomberg School of Public Health.

“What I’m hoping is that people are not afraid to vote in person if they haven’t voted yet,” he added. “Because I do think it’s possible to vote in a way where you can control your risk so that it wouldn’t be too different from going to the grocery store or going to the pharmacy.”

That includes voting in the late morning or early afternoon, when crowds are

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Health care: Trump takes last swipe at Affordable Care Act before Election Day

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services on Sunday gave the state permission to stop using the federal exchange, Healthcare.gov, for enrollment in the individual market and shift to a private sector Georgia Access Model, starting in 2023.

State officials argue that the move will give residents access to a broader array of options from web brokers, health insurance companies and agents — which will have a greater incentive to enroll consumers in coverage. They estimate the waiver will lower premiums and increase enrollment by 25,000 people.

Advocates, however, fear that it could shift healthier people to less comprehensive, non-Obamacare plans and leave those with pre-existing conditions facing higher premiums for Affordable Care Act policies. Plus, consumers could unknowingly sign up for skimpier policies.

“Consumer could end up in insurance plans that don’t cover everything they think it would cover,” said Tara Straw, senior policy analyst at the left-leaning Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

Share your story: How have you been helped or hurt by Obamacare?

What’s more, the Georgia waiver would eliminate residents’ ability to go to a single website to see all their options. Instead, they would have to navigate a fragmented system of broker and insurers — similar to what existed prior to the landmark health reform law, Straw said. This would likely decrease coverage and raise premiums.

The waiver does not meet the federal requirements for approval, including covering as many people with the same affordable and comprehensive coverage as without the waiver, Straw said. This will open up the approval to legal challenges.

The agency opened the door for states to create alternatives to Obamacare in 2018. The Peach State, which has the nation’s third highest uninsured rate at 13.4%, is the first to seek this enhanced power to reshape its individual market.

About 433,000 Georgians were enrolled in Obamacare exchange plans, as of February, according to federal data.

The approval came on the same day as open enrollment for 2021 began and 10 days before the Supreme Court is set to hear oral arguments in a case that could bring down the law.

The Trump administration is backing a coalition of Republican-led attorneys general, including Georgia’s, who argue that Obamacare’s individual mandate was rendered unconstitutional after Congress reduced the penalty for not having insurance to zero as part of the 2017 tax cut law. As a result, the entire health reform law must fall, they argue.

Health care has taken center stage in the 2020 presidential campaign. Former Vice President Joe Biden’s campaign has hammered President Donald Trump for trying to take down the law and its protections for those with pre-existing conditions. Trump has repeatedly said he has a replacement plan that would continue those safeguards but has yet to produce one.
The administration has pursued multiple avenues to overturn the Affordable Care Act in its first term. After efforts to repeal the law in Congress failed in 2017, officials started undermining it from within, including shortening the annual enrollment period to
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Boston Market, Chili’s, Planet Fitness and more offering free food, other services in Massachusetts on Election Day

Election Day is causing some added stress to many across the country but free food might add a bit of positivity to the day.

Companies are offering free food, workouts, massages and other deals regardless if you get that “I voted” sticker.

See below for a full list of companies in Massachusetts offering freebies on Tuesday, Nov. 3.

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts is offering free Bluebikes rides. They will be available in Arlington, Boston, Brookline, Cambridge, Everett, Newton, Somerville and Watertown. Customers just need to download the Bluebikes app and then choose “Adventure Pass” for unlimited two-hour rides on Election Day.

Boston Market is offering a late night deal because “Election Day could stretch well into the evening and beyond.” Customers can get a free slider after 9 p.m. on Election Day.

Chili’s is offering the Presidente Margarita in-restaurant or To-Go for $5. Customers will also get a limited-edition sticker to show your support for the “Margarita Party.” Costumers who share a photo on social media of them enjoying the Presidente with #PresidenteForPrez will be entered for a chance to “Live Like a Presidente for a year.” This includes Margarita Party merch, free Chili’s for a year, your own margarita machine and Chili’s margarita drinkware.

DoorDash won’t have any delivery fees for orders of at least $15 on Election Day. Users just need the promo code “VOTE.” DashPass subscribers that already benefit from free delivery will get 10% off, up to $5, with the code DPVOTE.

Jimmy John’s is celebrating National Sandwich Day, which is also on Nov. 3, with a free sandwich. Customers can buy one 8 inch or 16 inch sandwich using the code “SAVEON2” online or in the app to get 50% off any sandwich. The deal lasts until Nov. 8.

Lyft is offering 50% off one ride up to $10 to any polling location or dropbox. Customers just need to use the code 2020VOTE. It also includes bikes and scooters in select cities.

McDonald’s is giving away new bakery items for free, saying Halloween shouldn’t be the only day to treat yourself. The offer lasts from from Nov. 3 through Nov. 9.

Planet Fitness is helping customers “work off election stress” with a free workout and hydromassage. The offer lasts from Nov. 3 through Nov. 8.

Subway is offering a free sandwich when customers buy two.

Uber is offering 50% off roundtrip rides to and from the polls. It also applies on bikes and scooters.

Wendy’s is offering a free Classic Chicken Sandwich with any purchase through Nov. 8.

Be sure to follow all of MassLive’s coverage of the election.

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What kind of mask should you wear to vote in-person on Election Day?

While more than 94 million people have voted already in the 2020 presidential election, amounting to more than 67% of 2016’s overall turnout of 138 million votes, voters who plan to cast their ballot in-person are doing so as coronavirus cases continue to surge nationwide. 

“Face the Nation” moderator Margaret Brennan spoke with former Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb last week for insight on just what masks work best and are safest for those looking to vote on Election Day. 

Gottlieb said when it comes to masks that afford you the protection you need from others during the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s quality that matters.


Gottlieb warns of “dangerous tipping point” a…

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“A cloth mask may be 10% to 30% protective. A surgical mask, a level-two or level-three surgical mask, procedure mask, maybe about 60% effective. An N95 mask or an equivalent like a KN95 mask, which is the Chinese equivalent, or what we call an FFP2 mask, which is a European equivalent to an N95, that could be 90 to 95% protective,” Gottlieb said. 

“If you want to mask to afford you a level of protection, wear a higher quality mask. If you only can get a cloth mask, thickness matters and cloth masks with polyester in them and a combination of polyester and cotton do better,” he added.   

Gottlieb explained that masks largely serve two purposes: “One is to protect other people from you. So if you’re asymptomatic or pre-symptomatic, if you have a mask on, you’re less likely to expel respiratory droplets that can infect other people. The other purpose is to provide you some measure of protection if, in fact, you’re around people who are infected.”

His recommendation comes as the spread of the virus is accelerating in dozens of states, including across the Midwest and the Great Lakes region, while 15 states have a positivity rate above 10%. There is an expanding epidemic in all 50 states, he told “Face the Nation” on Sunday.

Gottlieb has also been optimistic that measures to protect those who choose to vote in-person would be taken seriously, but ultimately everyone has a personal responsibility to protect themselves. 

“I think when you go out to vote, the voting places are taking precautions. They’re sequencing people carefully. They’re cleaning the voting stations in between voters. Their lines are going to be long, but they’re going to take precautions inside those settings. And I think when people go out to vote, if they wear a high quality mask, they can adequately protect themselves,” he said on October 18.

“The biggest risk are the settings where we’re not on guard, where we let our guard down, where we are not taking those kinds of precautions. So I think you can vote safely, even in places where there’s high prevalence. But you’re going to need to be careful,” he added.

Since the outset of the pandemic, there have been more than 9.2 million coronavirus cases in the U.S., and the death

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Trump Suggests He Plans to Fire Fauci After Election | Health News

By Ernie Mundell and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters

(HealthDay)

MONDAY, Nov. 2, 2020 (HealthDay News) — During a rally in Florida late Sunday night, President Donald Trump suggested that he would fire the nation’s top infectious disease expert, Dr. Anthony Fauci, as soon as the presidential election is over on Tuesday.

As he expressed frustration that the coronavirus remains prominent in the news — U.S. case counts are at their highest levels since the pandemic began — supporters in the crowd began chanting, “Fire Fauci,” the Associated Press reported.

Trump replied with this: “Don’t tell anybody, but let me wait until a little bit after the election.” He has previously expressed that he was concerned about the political blowback of removing the popular and respected doctor before Election Day. He added he appreciated the “advice” of the crowd.

Fauci, who heads up the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, has begun to challenge the president publicly, saying that Trump has ignored his advice for containing the virus and that he hasn’t spoken with Trump in more than a month. He has also warned repeatedly that the nation is heading for a tough winter if more isn’t done soon to slow the spread of the disease which has killed more than 230,000 Americans so far this year, the AP reported.

The latest case counts suggest Fauci is right: More than 9.2 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, and the seven-day average of new daily coronavirus infections in the United States hit a new high of 81,740 on Sunday, the Washington Post reported. Record-shattering numbers of hospitalizations were also recorded in nine states: Alaska, Iowa, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, Ohio, South Dakota and Utah.

“There is no way to sugarcoat it: We are facing an urgent crisis, and there is an imminent risk to you, your family members, your friends, your neighbors,” Gov. Tony Evers of Wisconsin said last week, The New York Times reported.

Evers’ state has been hard by coronavirus: More than 200 coronavirus deaths were announced last week, and as case numbers have exploded, hospitals have been strained.

But Wisconsin is not alone. The surge that started in the Upper Midwest and rural West has now spread far beyond, sending infection levels soaring in places as disparate as El Paso, Chicago and Rexburg, Idaho, according to the New York Times.

Daily reports of deaths from the virus still remain far below their spring peaks, averaging around 800 a day, but those have also started to climb, the Times reported.

States say they don’t have enough money to distribute a COVID vaccine

Meanwhile, state health officials say they are frustrated about a lack of financial support from the federal government as they face orders to prepare to receive and distribute the first doses of a coronavirus vaccine by the unlikely target date of Nov. 15, the Post reported. And these officials stress that they don’t have enough money to pay for the massive undertaking.

State

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Medicaid’s Future As Safety-Net Health Care Hinges On Election : Shots

Health care activists rallied in front of the U.S. Capitol on March 22, 2017, to protest Republican efforts that would have dismantled the Affordable Care Act and capped federal payments for Medicaid patients. The Republican congressional bills, part of the party’s “repeal and replace” push in 2017, were eventually defeated.

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Health care activists rallied in front of the U.S. Capitol on March 22, 2017, to protest Republican efforts that would have dismantled the Affordable Care Act and capped federal payments for Medicaid patients. The Republican congressional bills, part of the party’s “repeal and replace” push in 2017, were eventually defeated.

Alex Wong/Getty Images

It was either put food on the table or drop their health insurance, says Oscar Anchia of Miami. His wife’s coverage was costing $700 a month, and his hours had been cut back because of the coronavirus pandemic. So Anchia made the difficult decision to drop his spouse from his policy, because they needed the money.

Then in October, his love for 40 years fell ill with COVID-19.

“This has been a crazy, crazy nightmare,” he said, after his wife’s first week in the hospital. He kept asking Baptist Health about the bill. He was already at $92,000 from her stay in the intensive care unit.

At this point, Anchia’s best hope is that his wife will be covered by a federal assistance program for uninsured COVID-19 patients. But that’s because he lives in one of the dozen holdout states that hasn’t expanded Medicaid through the Affordable Care Act. That part of the ACA was intended to provide health coverage for adults who are working but who have no insurance through their job — either because it’s not offered or because they can’t afford the premiums.

Medicaid provides health care for millions of low-income Americans. But its future depends very much on politics. Over the past four years, the Trump administration has tried to impose conservative principles on the program and shrink it. A Joe Biden presidency would attempt to go the other way.

“For example, me, I always work. I’ve been working 36 years in the same company,” says Anchia, who builds signage for airports. “And now I find myself in this position. Medicaid would be great for regular people. I’m not the only one.”

Anchia’s wife is out of the ICU, but he also expects he’ll need help paying for prescription medication when she’s sent home.

In Florida alone, roughly 1.5 million people would be eligible for coverage under Medicaid expansion, according to estimates by the Florida Health Justice Project. It’s a number that has grown recently because of the economic trouble and job losses triggered by the pandemic.

“The pandemic has really elevated the visibility of the suffering and that it cuts across socioeconomic lines,” says Miriam Harmatz, executive director of the Florida Health Justice Project. “These are folks you wouldn’t have expected to be among the ranks of the uninsured.”

Under a Biden

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Mental Health Advocates Say These Things Need To Change No Matter Who Wins The Election

Looking beyond Tuesday’s elections, mental health advocates are gearing up to become a more potent political lobby, as the fallout from the Covid-19 pandemic has caused a surge in people seeking services and flooded an already understaffed system. They are urging political leaders to increase funding and extend protections for mental healthcare regardless of who wins the presidency and the down-ballot races that will decide the makeup of Congress and statehouses around the country.

“We’re going to be seeing a tidal wave of people seeking out mental health support,” said Matthew Shapiro, associate director for public affairs at the National Alliance on Mental Illness in New York State, at a virtual policy panel in October. Many of the callers to a state-run support line during the pandemic have been “seeking out mental health services for the first time in their lives,” he said.

“That’s a very encouraging thing to hear the people are seeking help,” Shapiro said, adding that it’s “scary and really concerning” that there might not be enough help to go around.

Shapiro and other advocates are becoming more vocal about funding for mental health and issues that affect it, reflecting a desire to follow the example of activists who fought taboos against HIV and other conditions to win support in the halls of power.

The movement has a long way to go. Mental health and substance use have been virtually absent from the presidential debates. That lack of attention reflects mental health advocates’ lack of power, said Bill Smith, who this year founded Inseparable Action, a political group advocating for greater access to mental healthcare. “There are a lot of really, really smart people who know what we need to do and understand the policy solutions. They just don’t have the power to get it done,” said Smith, the former political director for a marriage equality group.

Inseparable Action aims to help build that political power. It helped pass California’s new law making it harder for insurers to deny mental healthcare and is at work on an agenda of reforms Congress can pass and ones the president can make without its approval. Those include more strongly enforcing the equality of mental and medical benefits and rolling out the new 9-8-8 emergency number for mental health crises. While Smith personally supports Joe Biden’s campaign and has raised money for it, a second Trump administration could also act on any of those proposals. “There are things that need to happen no matter who the president is,” Smith said.

Groups that support people with mental illness are raising their voices as well. Fountain House, a community center in New York for people with serious mental illness, helps its members build social, vocational, and educational skills by teaching them to run the center itself. It can also help members advocate for their political

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Dr. Anthony Fauci unleashes on White House coronavirus approach days before election

As President Donald Trump fights his way through the final days of the presidential campaign denying the pandemic — by lashing out at doctors, disputing science and slashing the press for highlighting rising coronavirus case counts — the long-running rift between the White House and Dr. Anthony Fauci burst into the open Saturday night.



Anthony S. Fauci wearing a suit and tie: WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 17: (L-R) U.S. President Donald Trump, joined by members of the Coronavirus Task Force, speaks as National Institute Of Allergy And Infectious Diseases Director Dr. Anthony Fauci looks on during a press conference about the coronavirus outbreak in the press briefing room at the White House on March 17, 2020 in Washington, DC. The Trump administration is considering an $850 billion stimulus package to counter the economic fallout as the coronavirus spreads. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)


© Drew Angerer/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC – MARCH 17: (L-R) U.S. President Donald Trump, joined by members of the Coronavirus Task Force, speaks as National Institute Of Allergy And Infectious Diseases Director Dr. Anthony Fauci looks on during a press conference about the coronavirus outbreak in the press briefing room at the White House on March 17, 2020 in Washington, DC. The Trump administration is considering an $850 billion stimulus package to counter the economic fallout as the coronavirus spreads. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

For months as Trump undercut his own medical experts, sidelined scientists and refused to take basic steps to control the virus while mocking former Vice President Joe Biden for wearing a mask, the nation’s top infectious disease specialist held his tongue and took the President’s attacks in stride as he continued to plead with the American people to socially distance and wear masks.

But Fauci’s restraint appeared to have evaporated in a Washington Post interview that was published Saturday night, in which he called out the White House for allowing its strategy for fighting the virus to be shaped in part by a neuroradiologist with no training in the field of infectious disease and said he appreciated chief of staff Mark Meadows’ honesty when he admitted to CNN’s Jake Tapper during a recent interview that the administration has given up controlling the spread of the virus.

At a time when Trump is downplaying the rising cases in the vast majority of states, dangerously holding huge rallies with few masks and no social distancing, and lodging the false and outlandish claim that doctors are exaggerating the number of Covid deaths for profit, Fauci told the Post that the nation is “in for a whole lot of hurt.”

“All the stars are aligned in the wrong place” as the country heads indoors in colder weather, Fauci told the newspaper in an interview late Friday — a day when the US set a global record for the most daily cases and the nation surpassed 229,000 deaths. “You could not possibly be positioned more poorly.”

View Trump and Biden head-to-head polling

Fauci, who is widely trusted by the public after a lengthy career serving under six presidents from both parties, said Meadows was being candid in the interview last weekend where he told Tapper it was not possible to control the virus. Fauci has adopted the polar opposite strategy by repeatedly telling Americans that they can change the trajectory of the virus and save lives if they adhere to mask use, social distancing protocols and other safety precautions.

“I tip my hat to him for admitting the strategy,” Fauci told the Post of Meadows’

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N.J.’s medical marijuana chief douses senator’s pipe dream of legal weed for sale immediately after the election

EDITOR’S NOTE: NJ Cannabis Insider produces exclusive weekly content and monthly events geared toward those interested in the marijuana and hemp industries. To subscribe, visit njcannabisinsider.biz.

Not long after state Sen. Nick Scutari claimed on Tuesday legislators and regulators may “be able to flip the switch and people might be able to get marijuana, legally, right after the vote,” the head of the state medical cannabis program doused that pipe dream with a bucket of cold water.

“(Some dispensaries) literally do not even have the space to accommodate the level of demand that personal-use sales would bring,” said Jeff Brown, who helms the Department of Health’s Medicinal Marijuana Program. “I could say unequivocally that opening up sales even a few months after the election would be a disaster and would really hurt access for patients who need this as medicine. My number one priority is to ensure that the patients have access — that’s going to be our priority first and foremost.”

Since the passage of Jake Honig’s Law, the medical program continues to grow in terms of patients and demand — about 7,000 patients per month on average and nearly 95,000 patients enrolled in total — but the program continues to face supply challenges for just the current patient population due to the small number of operational cultivators and canopy space.

Scutari, in his comments during an interview with NJ Cannabis Insider streamed live on NJ.com’s Facebook page Tuesday, that “(the) currently operating medical cannabis dispensaries would have an opportunity to sell to the general public for people over 21, if they can certify that they have enough product to satisfy their patients that they’re already treating.”

Brown, who also participated in a closed portion of the webinar, tamped down the senator’s suggestion at the time. He said he wants to keep an open dialogue with legislators and make the program’s priorities clear to medical patients and Garden State citizens as a whole.

“Inventories at alternative treatment centers are increasing, too, but it’s uneven,” he said. “We have some that are expanding capacity and then we have others that are simply maintaining and have really no room to expand cultivation in their current footprints.”

For the past six months, Brown said, the medical cannabis program has averaged about only 2,100 pounds in sales per month, rising to nearly 2,500 in September with a similar trend in October. Based on an average of the patient population, patients typically only buy a half-ounce each month, he said.

As of this past Friday, Brown said, there were about 10,000 pounds of medical cannabis in the market — about evenly split between flower and extracts, though flower tends to have higher sales. That means there’s enough medical cannabis to last about four months, given current sales trends and more limited choices for patients.

Part of the challenges dispensaries face, Brown said, is the small indoor canopy. There’s a dozen cultivators in New Jersey, but the average dispensary only has a canopy of

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