UVA’s David S. Wilkes elected to prestigious National Academy of Medicine

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IMAGE: David S. Wilkes, MD, dean of the University of Virginia School of Medicine, has been elected to the National Academy of Medicine.
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David S. Wilkes, MD, dean of the University of Virginia School of Medicine, has been elected to the National Academy of Medicine, one of the highest honors in the fields of health and medicine.

Wilkes was among 100 new members elected this week to the National Academy, which has more than 2,000 members chosen by current members for their contributions to the advancement of the medical sciences, healthcare and public health.

“I am honored to be joining the National Academy of Medicine,” Wilkes said. “I am so appreciative of this recognition from national leaders in healthcare and scientific research.”

A Leader in Research and Diversifying Medicine

Wilkes has served as dean and James Carroll Flippin Professor of Medical Sciences at the UVA School of Medicine since September 2015. Under his leadership, the School of Medicine has steadily increased its research funding, earning a UVA-record $146.3 million in funding from the National Institutes of Health in fiscal year 2019.

Along with helping to bolster UVA’s research enterprise, Wilkes has made significant contributions of his own to the field of biomedical research. He has co-authored more than 100 research papers, holds six U.S. patents and co-founded ImmuneWorks Inc., which researched and developed treatments for immune-mediated lung diseases including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and lung transplant rejection.

He has also worked to diversify the ranks of healthcare faculty members, serving since 2013 as national director of the Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The program seeks to increase the number of medical, dental and nursing faculty from historically disadvantaged backgrounds.

“David has had a tremendous career as a researcher, a leader in academic medicine and as an educator and mentor to countless physician scientists,” said K. Craig Kent, MD, UVA’s executive vice president for health affairs. “He is truly deserving of this honor.”

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About Wilkes

Wilkes received a bachelor of science degree from Villanova University and his medical degree from Temple University. He then completed his residency at Temple University Hospital, followed by a pulmonary and critical care fellowship at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. He is also a military veteran, having served three years as a major in the U.S. Air Force Medical Corps.

Before coming to UVA, Wilkes worked at Indiana University for 22 years, rising to become executive associate dean for research affairs at the Indiana University School of Medicine. He also served as the university’s assistant vice president for research and as director of the Strategic Research Initiative for the Indiana University School of Medicine and Indiana University Health, as well as director of the Indiana University School of Medicine’s Physician Scientist Initiative.

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Purdue nutrition epidemiologist elected to National Academy of Medicine

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. — Regan Bailey’s career as a nutritional epidemiologist has always been about exploring choices people and families make regarding nutrition quality and quantity.

Recently Bailey was honored for her work on measuring nutritional status to optimize health by being elected as one of 100 new members of the National Academy of Medicine.

Bailey, a professor of nutrition science in Purdue’s Department of Nutrition Science, which is housed in the College of Health and Human Sciences, was selected to the academy for her continued work on improving the methods to measure nutritional status for optimal health outcomes including better understanding intake exposures and the use of dietary supplements. Her research has highlighted the pervasive use of dietary supplements and how these products contribute to dietary disparities by race, sex, age and poverty, and how they relate to health. She also directs the Indiana Clinical and Translational Science Institute, Purdue Diet Assessment Center.

The dietary issues facing Americans are something Bailey reviews on a daily basis, especially as she just completed an appointment to the 2020 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee.

“Our nation is plagued with obesity and other chronic health conditions, many of which are directly related to low diet quality,” Bailey says. “Nutrition scientists are being valued as part of interdisciplinary groups of scientists and medical professionals with different perspectives and expertise to address critical issues relevant to human health, especially as the field is moving closer to an era of personalized nutrition.”

Purdue President Mitch Daniels said, “Dr. Bailey’s continued research on nutrition and human health is life-changing, persistently pursuing new discoveries. Her nomination and membership into the National Academy of Medicine is a testament to her dedication and expertise to Purdue, the nation and world.”

Bailey has been at Purdue since 2013, starting as an adjunct faculty member before joining full time in 2015. Before Purdue, Bailey was a nutritional epidemiologist and director of career development and outreach at the National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements. She is a registered dietitian who completed a dietetic internship and Master of Science in food and nutrition from the Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Bailey received her doctorate in nutrition science from The Pennsylvania State University. She completed a master of public health from the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University.

Established as the Institute of Medicine in 1970 by the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Medicine addresses critical issues in health, science, medicine, and related policy and inspires positive actions across sectors. NAM works alongside the National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Engineering to provide independent, objective analysis and advice to the nation and conduct other activities to solve complex problems and inform public policy decisions. The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine also encourage education and research, recognize outstanding contributions to knowledge, and increase public understanding of STEMM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics and medicine). With their election, NAM members make a commitment to volunteer their service in

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Marc Lipsitch, Pardis Sabeti elected to National Academy of Medicine | News

October 20, 2020 – Two Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health faculty members, Marc Lipsitch and Pardis Sabeti, have been elected to the National Academy of Medicine (NAM). Membership is considered one of the highest honors in the fields of health and medicine and recognizes individuals who have demonstrated outstanding professional achievements and commitment to service.

Lipsitch is a professor of epidemiology with a primary appointment in the Department of Epidemiology and a joint appointment in the Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases. He also directs the School’s Center for Communicable Disease Dynamics. Lipsitch’s research concerns the effect of naturally acquired host immunity, vaccine-induced immunity, and other public health interventions, such as antimicrobial use, on the population biology of pathogens and the consequences of changing pathogen populations for human health. During the COVID-19 pandemic, Lipsitch has been at the forefront of the School’s public response, keeping policymakers, the public, and the scientific community informed about the trajectory of the pandemic and ways to stop its spread. NAM recognized Lipsitch for making major immunologic, genomic, and evolutionary advances in understanding pneumococcal biology, contributing to defining influenza seasonality mechanisms, and making large contributions to computational and statistical methods for vaccine evaluation.

Sabeti is a professor of immunology and infectious diseases at Harvard Chan School. She is also a professor at the Harvard FAS Center for Systems Biology and the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, an institute member of the Broad Institute, and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator. Her lab focuses on developing new analytical and genomic methods to study evolutionary adaptation and genetic diversity in humans and pathogens, with three current research foci: identifying and characterizing the underlying adaptive changes that have shaped the human species over time; investigating genetic diversity in pathogens such as Lassa virus, Ebola virus, Zika virus, and Babesia microti, with the goal of improving diagnostics, surveillance, and interventions; and developing novel tools to detect and diagnose microbes causing human morbidity and mortality. NAM recognized Sabeti for her leadership in generating and releasing the first viral genome data during the 2013–2016 West African Ebola outbreak to advance countermeasures in the response, and noted that her team’s work in genomics, information theory, diagnostics, rural surveillance, and education have further contributed to efforts to combat Zika, Lassa, Ebola, malaria, and many other infectious diseases.

The National Academy of Medicine is an independent organization of professionals from diverse fields including health and medicine; the natural, social, and behavioral sciences; and beyond. It serves alongside the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering as an adviser to the nation and the international community.

Read the National Academy of Medicine press release: National Academy of Medicine Elects 100 New Members

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Five Penn Faculty Members Elected to The National Academy of Medicine


Five faculty members from The University of Pennsylvania have been elected to the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) — one of the nation’s highest honors in the fields of health and medicine.

Dr. William Beltran of the school of veterinary medicine; Dr. Matthew McHugh of the school of nursing, and Drs. Ronald DeMatteo, Raina Merchant, and Hongjun Song of the Perelman School of Medicine are among the 100 new members, who have made major contributions to the advancement of the medical sciences, health care, and public health.

 

 

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Five professors elected to National Academy of Medicine | News Center

Laurence Baker, PhD, professor of medicine and the Bing Professor of Human Biology, was elected for “contributions on consequences of rapid health care technology adoption, the importance of physician practice organization for costs and outcomes, the proliferation of out-of-network billing, and physician gender-based income disparities.”

Jeffrey Goldberg, MD, PhD, professor and chair of ophthalmology and the Blumenkranz Smead Professor, was elected “for his contribution to the understanding of the regeneration of retinal ganglion cells and axonal growth, and for being a driving force behind vision restoration clinical trials in glaucoma therapeutics and biomarker development.”

Steven Goodman, MD, PhD, MHS, associate dean for clinical and translational research and professor of medicine and of epidemiology and population health, was elected “for his expertise in scientific inference and research reproducibility, utilizing diverse methods to inform public decisions about medical interventions. His work has led to a long series of critical contributions to national deliberative bodies, including medical journals, funders, insurers, the courts, and the NAM,” an acronym for the National Academy of Medicine.

Fei-Fei Li, PhD, professor of computer science and co-director of the Stanford Institute of Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence, was elected “for helping establish the field of vision-based artificial intelligence, engendering diverse high-yield medical applications, including her current innovative focus on health-critical clinician and patient behavior recognition.”

Hannah Valantine, MBBS, DSc, professor of medicine, senior investigator at the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute and former chief officer of scientific workforce diversity at the National Institutes of Health, was elected “for her national leadership in both scientific workforce diversity and cardiac transplantation research. Her data-driven approach in these two important areas has led to game-changing policies and new programs that enriched the nation’s biomedical talent pool and have generated paradigm-shifting innovations in patient care.”

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John Dick elected to National Academy of Medicine

Dr. John Dick, a professor in the department of molecular genetics in the Temerty Faculty of Medicine and senior scientist at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, has been elected to the prestigious National Academy of Medicine (NAM).

The NAM is one of three academies that comprise the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in the United States. Each year, the NAM elects up to 100 members, including 10 international members, recognized for their achievements in health and medicine.

A Canada Research Chair in Stem Cell Biology, Dick is globally recognized for his discovery of leukemia stem cells, made possible by an assay he developed. The assay involves transplanting cells from human adult bone marrow, normal or cancerous, into an experimental model to gauge cancer initiation. Using this approach, he revealed that only a­­ small subset of these cells was capable of initiating leukemia and was the main cause of disease relapse. These contributions have helped shape the understanding of cancer and reveal new strategies for curing the disease.

“The University of Toronto congratulates Professor John Dick on this richly deserved recognition,” said University Professor Ted Sargent, vice-president, research and innovation, and strategic initiatives. “He has revolutionized our understanding of leukemia.”

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Two Yale faculty elected to National Academy of Medicine

Yale’s Michelle Bell and Daniel Colón-Ramos were among 100 new members elected to the National Academy of Medicine, the academy announced Oct. 19.

Bell, the Mary E. Pinchot Professor of Environmental Health at the Yale School of the Environment (YSE), was elected for her research which focuses on how human health is affected by environmental conditions, including air pollution, weather, and climate change. She also examines environmental justice.

In recognition of her work, Bell has received the Prince Albert II de Monaco/Institut Pasteur Award, the Rosenblith New Investigator Award, and the NIH Outstanding New Environmental Scientist (ONES) Award.

Colón-Ramos, the McConnell Duberg Professor of Neuroscience and Cell Biology in the department of neuroscience, was recognized “for making fundamental discoveries regarding the cell biology of the synapse,’’ the academy wrote.  His lab focuses on how neuronal synapses are formed and maintained to control behavior and store memories. 

Colón-Ramos was a recipient of the 2018 National Institutes of Health Pioneer Award, the 2018 Landis Award for Outstanding Mentorship from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, the American Association for the Advancement of Science Early Career Award, and the Sloan Research Fellowship. 

Established originally as the Institute of Medicine in 1970 by the National Academy of Sciences, the U.S. National Academy of Medicine addresses critical issues in health, science, medicine, and related policy and inspires positive actions across sectors. NAM works alongside the National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Engineering to provide independent, objective analysis and advice to the nation and conduct other activities to solve complex problems and inform public policy decisions. 

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Mount Sinai doctors elected to National Academy of Medicine for contributions to emergency medicine and translational genetics

Brendan G. Carr, MD, MA, MS, Chair of Emergency Medicine for the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the Mount Sinai Health System, and Judy H. Cho, MD, Dean of Translational Genetics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and Director of The Charles Bronfman Institute for Personalized Medicine, have been elected to the National Academy of Medicine (NAM). Election to the NAM is considered one of the highest honors in health and medicine, recognizing individuals who have demonstrated outstanding professional achievement and commitment to service. With their election, Mount Sinai has 25 faculty members in the NAM.

“The recognitions of Dr. Carr and Dr. Cho are well deserved for their groundbreaking contributions to emergency medicine and translational genetics,” says Dennis S. Charney, MD, Anne and Joel Ehrenkranz Dean of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. “Dr. Carr’s research has focused not only on improving the emergency care system for time-sensitive conditions such as trauma, stroke, cardiac arrest, and sepsis, but also on creating a more distributed and innovative approach to increasing access to acute care. Likewise, Dr. Cho is committed to improving care through personalized medicine and the understanding of each patient’s unique genes. She has enhanced genetic research, clinical implementation, and data platforms to ensure Mount Sinai remains at the forefront of genetic discoveries and implementation.”

Emergency Medicine

A leading voice in emergency medicine, Dr. Carr played a central role in coordinating Mount Sinai’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. He has dedicated his career as an emergency medicine physician and health policy researcher to seamlessly combining research, policy, and practice to advance acute care delivery. Before joining Mount Sinai in February 2020, Dr. Carr held faculty positions at the Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

Outside academia, Dr. Carr has worked within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services during both the current and previous administrations to improve trauma and emergency care services at the national level. His roles have included Senior Advisor and Director of the Emergency Care Coordination Center within the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, focusing on integrating the emergency care system into the broader health care delivery system. He previously supported the Indian Health Service’s initiatives to improve emergency care delivery, and worked with the Department of Veterans Affairs and the Department of Defense to integrate military and civilian health care response during disasters and public health emergencies. Dr. Carr has advised and supported major not-for-profit foundations, the World Health Organization, and the National Academy of Medicine.

He conducts health services research that connects disciplines including epidemiology, health care policy, business, economics, and health care delivery system science. His work has been continuously funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. He has published and lectured widely on systems of care for trauma, stroke, cardiac

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4 UCSF Faculty Elected to the National Academy of Medicine for 2020

Four UC San Francisco faculty members are among the 100 new national and international members elected this year to the National Academy of Medicine (NAM), one of the highest honors in the fields of health of medicine.

Membership in the NAM recognizes individuals who have demonstrated outstanding professional achievements and commitment to service in the medical sciences, health care and public health.

“This distinguished and diverse class of new members is a truly exceptional group of scholars and leaders whose expertise in science, medicine, health, and policy will be integral to helping the NAM address today’s most pressing health challenges and inform the future of health and health care for the benefit of everyone around the globe,” National Academy of Medicine President Victor J. Dzau said in a press release. “It is my privilege to welcome these esteemed individuals to the National Academy of Medicine.”

This year, this distinguished group welcomes four UCSF faculty:

  • Mark Anderson, MD, PhD, professor of medicine and Robert B. Friend and Michelle M. Friend Endowed Chair in Diabetes Research
  • Edward Chang, MD, Jeanne Robertson Distinguished Professor and Joan and Sandy Weill Chair of the Department of Neurological Surgery
  • Aleksandar Rajkovic, MD, PhD, Stuart Lindsay Distinguished Professor in Experimental Pathology and Chief Genomics Officer of UCSF Health
  • Robert Wachter, MD, Holly Smith Distinguished Professor in Science and Medicine, Benioff Endowed Chair in Hospital Medicine, and chair of the Department of Medicine
Mark Anderson portrait

Mark Anderson, MD, PhD

Anderson is a physician-scientist who cares for patients with autoimmune endocrine diseases such as type 1 diabetes. This focus extends into the lab, where his research examines the genetic control of autoimmune diseases to better understand the mechanisms by which immune tolerance is broken.

In particular, his lab is interested in how the thymus trains the immune system to distinguish proteins made by the body itself from proteins made by invasive pathogens. For example, they have shown that some thymus cells produce “self” proteins and others even differentiate into skin or gut cells to test newborn T cells for autoimmune tendencies. Understanding these mechanisms could one day lead to medical interventions that suppress or enhance immune activity.

Anderson is a member of the UCSF Diabetes Center and the UCSF Bakar ImmunoX Initiative, director of the UCSF Medical Scientist Training Program, and current president of the Federation of Clinical Immunology.

Edward Chang smiling.

Edward Chang, MD

Chang is a neurosurgeon-scientist and chair of the Department of Neurological Surgery. He specializes in advanced brain mapping methods to preserve crucial areas for language and cognitive functions in the brain. Chang is a member of the UCSF Weill Institute for Neurosciences and co-director of the Center for Neural Engineering and Prostheses, a collaboration between UCSF and UC Berkeley.

Chang’s research focuses on the brain mechanisms for human behaviors such as speech and mood. For example, by studying the brain activity associated with the physical movements of speaking, his team was able to teach a computer to decode and transform these brain signals into synthetic speech. This technology has

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Five Penn faculty elected to the National Academy of Medicine

Five faculty members from Penn have been elected to the National Academy of Medicine (NAM), one of the nation’s highest honors in the fields of health and medicine. William Beltran of the School of Veterinary Medicine, Matthew McHugh of the School of Nursing, and Ronald DeMatteo, Raina Merchant, and Hongjun Song of the Perelman School of Medicine are among the 100 new members, elected by current NAM members.

Election recognizes individuals who have made major contributions to the advancement of the medical sciences, health care, and public health.

William Beltran is professor of ophthalmology in the Department of Clinical Sciences and Advanced Medicine and director of the Division of Experimental Retinal Therapies at Penn Vet. His research focuses on inherited retinal degeneration, a major cause of blindness in dogs and humans worldwide. Specifically, he has investigated the signaling pathways affected by X-linked retinitis pigmentosa and autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa, two of the most common forms of inherited retinal degeneration in humans. Working in canines, who suffer from forms of retinal degeneration that closely mimic the human diseases, he has helped develop effective gene therapies with promising results for treating both early- and late-stage disease.

Ronald Paul DeMatteo is the John Rhea Barton Professor and chair in the Perelman School of Medicine’s Department of Surgery. DeMatteo served as principal investigator on three national trials for the adjuvant drug imatinib for gastrointestinal stromal tumor, the most common human sarcoma. His work led to imatinib’s approval for adjuvant use by the FDA and established the standard-of-care for GIST, combining surgery and imatinib. DeMatteo is also being recognized for his work to define the immune response to GIST and its modulation by targeted therapy.

Matthew McHugh is the Independence Chair for Nursing Education and professor of nursing at Penn Nursing, associate director of the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research (CHOPR), and senior fellow of the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics. As principal investigator on multiple large-scale studies funded by the National Institutes of Health, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, McHugh’s work has advanced the field of nursing outcomes and policy research by showing the value of investing in nursing to achieve a higher functioning health care system. In addition to findings from direct evaluations of nurse staffing ratio laws, research from McHugh and colleagues from the CHOPR at Penn Nursing has informed legislation proposed in multiple states and countries on safe nurse-staffing levels.

Raina Merchant is associate vice president and director of the Center for Digital Health in Penn Medicine and associate professor of emergency medicine in the Perelman School of Medicine. Merchant’s work has sought to gain insights through digital media about important health trends, and she is recognized for developing, deploying, evaluating, and refining novel tools and techniques to promote individual and population health. Some of her projects in this arena include tracking both physical and mental health symptoms via Twitter during the COVID-19 pandemic, determining keywords and phrases that could be used

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