This Myanmar Doctor Gave Up a Life of Medicine and Is Now a Famous OnlyFans Model

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Nang Mwe San during a photoshoot. Photo: Aung Naing Soe

“Should I remove the cover-up?” Myanmar model Nang Mwe San asked during a recent shoot to advertise a male enhancement capsule promising bigger penises, harder erections, and a better sex life. 

The pink sarong was wrapped around her waist. She removed it, walked down to the shallow end of a pool, faced the camera, and smiled while posing for photographs.

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“We’ve had other sexy models for ads … but Nang Mwe San’s name trumps all of them,” Moe Kyaw, the distributor of the pills, told VICE World News. “People are more interested in the products when she’s the one endorsing them.”

Little known outside her country, the 30-year-old trained physician is famous in Myanmar, where her story from doctor working in conflict zones to on-camera performer has been met with fascination, anger, and shock in a country where few women would talk so openly about a life in adult entertainment.

It started about two years ago, when she began posting provocative photos of herself on Facebook, where she now has 1.7 million followers. The photos gained an audience and caught the attention of the medical establishment, which took her license away in 2019, arguing that her images were inappropriate and “not in line with Myanmar culture.”

She found herself in a dilemma. Should she fight to get her license back and fulfill her parents’ wishes of being a doctor, or should she follow her other passion and become a full-time model? She soon resigned from her job working as a medical officer for an NGO.

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“I enjoyed posting sexy photos on social media. The organization I was working with at that time didn’t like it,” she said.

“Revoking my medical license was a huge push for me to become a full-time model.” 

After shrugging off the public censure she doubled down and signed up to OnlyFans. The subscription-based content platform has made cult celebrities out of sex workers and adult performers around the world. But in conservative Myanmar, the career shift did not go over well. 

“Many criticized me including relatives, friends, and people on social media, but I didn’t really think about them,” Nang Mwe San said. “I do not even check the negative comments under the social media accounts.”

She is right not to. A quick perusal of her page shows sexually abusive comments and insults to her character.

Since her early days as a doctor, however, Nang Mwe San has always had something of an independent streak, wanting to go to places others might shy away from. She was drawn to medical work in conflict zones, and for a time worked for an NGO in Shan, Kachin, and Rakhine States, including in displaced camps for the Rohingya Muslim minority.

“While other fresh graduates were not willing to serve in the countryside and tried to get postings in cities like Yangon, I wanted to go to such places,” she said, adding that her parents were constantly worried about

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Avoid medicine sold online: doctor

RISK:
Only 10 percent of men with erectile dysfunction seek medical help, with many attempting to treat the condition with pills purchased online, a physician said

  • By Yang Yuan-ting
    and William Hetherington / Staff reporter, with staff writer

A New Taipei City doctor has advised people to avoid purchasing medication on the Internet, citing a patient who had bought counterfeit pills for the treatment of erectile dysfunction.

Taiwanese Association of Andrology director Chen Yu (陳煜) said the patient, a 40-year-old man, had used the pills for three months without knowing they contained mostly starch.

About half of Taiwanese men above 40 have some degree of erectile dysfunction, Chen said.

Erectile dysfunction is categorized by severity, with those mildly afflicted being able to have intercourse, but not becoming fully erect, he said.

Those moderately afflicted might become partially erect, but are unable to engage in intercourse, while those with severe erectile dysfunction are completely unable to become erect, Chen added.

The rate of occurrence of erectile dysfunction in men under 40 is three times what it was five years ago, he said.

Erectile dysfunction worsens over time if not treated, and as many younger men are embarrassed about the problem and put off treatment, many of those under 40 that he treats already have advanced conditions, Chen said, adding that 5 percent of them have severe conditions.

Erectile dysfunction can be a sign of imminent heart disease, since it is often caused by blocked arteries, generally indicating circulatory problems, diabetes or other problems, association secretary-general Wu Chia-chang (吳佳璋) said.

More than 60 percent of men with erectile dysfunction develop heart disease within three years of seeking treatment for the condition, he said, adding that patients complain that many aspects of their lives, including work performance, suffer from the condition.

Citing research statistics, Wu said that only about 10 percent of men with erectile dysfunction seek treatment, with many attempting to treat the condition on their own with pills purchased on the Internet.

“Companies selling fake medicine see it as an opportunity, with many putting fake labels on their products to pass them off as real medicine,” he said.

Chen said he once treated a patient who had an erection that lasted several days after taking counterfeit medicine he bought on the Internet.

The patient was left with some permanent physical damage, he said.

Chen said he and his colleagues had sent a letter to the online retail platform that sold the counterfeit medicine, and had reported the company to the Food and Drug Administration.

However, as many firms making such products are located outside of Taiwan, which makes prosecution difficult, Chen advised people to exercise caution and not purchase medication online, but to seek treatment from a medical professional.

Comments will be moderated. Keep comments relevant to the article. Remarks containing abusive and obscene language, personal attacks of any kind or promotion will be removed and …

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After 41 years of practice, Mendota Heights doctor finds renewed purpose in virtual medicine

Dr. Carolyn Borow has delivered more than 3,500 babies in her 41 years as a family doctor. But she hasn’t delivered one since the coronavirus pandemic began.

Instead Borow, like many medical professionals, has gone virtual, doing all those appointments about pregnancy complications, sore throats and COVID fears via computer and FaceTime. In fact, the only time she’s been in a hospital recently was when she herself had surgery.

“I am definitely going through baby withdrawal,” said Borow, who works out of Allina Health in West St. Paul and Eagan. “I’d never planned that at some point I’m not going to be doing this. Only a pandemic would keep me from it.”

At a time when a growing number of veteran doctors are suddenly considering retirement, Borow is finding renewed purpose in her work.

A 2020 survey of 2,300 U.S. physicians by the nonprofit Physicians Foundation reported that 37% of doctors said they would like to retire within a year. Many expressed fear for their personal health, including 28% who had “serious concerns” about catching COVID-19.

Borow, though, sees value in her shifting work experience.

“I thank everybody who is making these appointments,” Borow said. “Because it has allowed me to still feel meaningful. Because I had no intention ever of not continuing to serve people.”

Initially, to cut down on coronavirus exposure, Allina limited the number of its doctors going in and out of United Hospital in St. Paul, where Borow has worked. So, Allina hired doctors to serve full time in the hospital.

Secondly, because of her age and medical risks during the COVID crisis, Borow decided to curtail her in-person contact with patients. She went virtual on the fly.

“It was all new to me,” she said of distance doctoring. “But in my motivation to serve people, I just learned it quickly.”

Borow is as busy as ever. An empty nester with a retired husband, she dons her scrubs every morning — in the clinic, she used to wear streets clothes and a lab coat — and sits at an Allina-issued computer in her son’s old bedroom in their Mendota Heights home. Her two cats sometimes scratch at the door. But Borow is diligent and determined, officially working 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday (actually, two nights until 6) and on-call every other weekend. Of course, that doesn’t include the two or three hours every night of paperwork and the pre-shift prep for her appointments.

She also spends a half-day per week in the clinic signing forms, wearing a mask and shield over her glasses.

With a different virtual patient scheduled every 20 minutes, the doctor is much more punctual than in her days at the clinic, where an assistant could warn an impatient patient that the physician is running late.

“I have openings every day, people can get right in, which was never the case before,” Borow said. “Although before, we could work someone in with double booking.”

She’s now able to see patients

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Black Friday Vitamin Sales Worth Shopping, From a Doctor

The supplements aisle contains a dizzying amount of products. (Valerian root? Horny goat weed?) Come Black Friday, you’ll be able to shop plenty of these dietary supplements at a major price cut. To help you sort through what’s worth your dollars—and what simply is not—I consulted Matthew Kohler, MD, and Rajivan Maniam, MD, functional medicine doctors and co-founders of Ospina Medical in New York City.

Despite the countless options on the shelf, Dr. Kohler and Dr. Maniam say the average person really only needs to consider five supplements. As always, you should consult your own doctor before adding new supplements to your diet.

The vitamins and supplements to buy on Black Friday

1. Vitamin D

black friday vitamin sales
Photo: Swanson Vitamins

“Vitamin D, the ‘sunshine vitamin,’ has long been pinned as one of the most common vitamin deficiencies that many of us suffer from,” says Dr. Maniam. “While seemingly benign, deficiency in Vitamin D may in fact be propagating pain. To date, there are several observational studies showing an association between vitamin D deficiency and different pain conditions including low back pain, menstrual cramps, and chronic pain.” Dr. Maniam adds that taking vitamin D supplements has the possibility of offering many positives with no known negative side effects, so hey, it’s worth a shot!

Shop Black Friday sale: Vitamin D, $10 (originally $12)

2. Vitamin B12

Photo: HUM

Vitamin B12 is like catnip for the brain—and Dr. Kohler recommends it for anyone who wants some extra cognitive sharpness. “Vitamin B12 is essential for many biological functions and offers numerous known benefits including energy production and assisting in more efficient cellular reproduction,” he says.  B12 is also credited with improving your mood, supporting fetal development, and improving memory—so yeah, it’s worth adding to your medicine cabinet with your doc’s okay.

Shop Black Friday sale: Vitamin B12, up to 50 percent off $10

3. Vitamin C

black friday vitamin sales
Photo: Ancient Nutrition

Vitamin C may be best known for its immune system-boosting abilities, but Dr. Kohler recommends it for another reason. “Vitamin C is a critical nutrient for patients with pain or recent injuries—not only for its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and pain-relieving abilities but also for its role in tissue repair and regeneration,” says Dr. Kohler. “Vitamin C helps accelerate the healing process and protects the body from free radical damage. This becomes especially important in patients who have sports injuries such as tendonitis or ligament sprains.” Athletes, this supplement’s for you.

Shop Black Friday sale: Ancient Nutrients Vitamin C + Probiotics, $14 (originally $19)

4. Vitamin K

Photo: Swanson

“Vitamin K works as an enzyme cofactor that has been implicated in inflammation, cardiovascular disease, and osteoarthritis,” says Dr. Maniam. “Inflammation is recognized as a crucial component of many chronic aging diseases and evidence suggests vitamin K has an anti-inflammatory action.”

Shop Black Friday sale: Swanson K-2, Buy one at $10 and get one free

4. Vitamin E

black friday vitamin sales
Photo: HUM

Dr. Maniam says vitamin C is another one that’s essential for anyone who takes their workout

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2-year-old boy with rare disease dresses up as his doctor for Halloween

Dr. William Tse said he was “honored” by the costume.

Many 2-year-old boys want to dress up as Superman or Spiderman for Halloween, but Jonah Bump decided to dress up as a different type of superhero – his doctor.

Jonah was diagnosed with a rare immune deficiency disorder, severe combined immunodeficiency disease, when he was very young. Because of this, Dr. William Tse, the director of pediatric stem cell transplantation at Norton Children’s Cancer Institute in Louisville, Kentucky, performed a stem cell transplant on Jonah when he was just 7 months old.

Because he did not have a functioning immune system, Jonah needed to be isolated in a room at the hospital. His mother, Laurie Bump, says for the most part Tse and hospital staff were the only people they were allowed to see.

“The doctors and nurses became like extended family to us,” Bump said. “Dr. Tse went out of his way to do things for me just out of kindness. Our family has a soft spot for Dr. Tse because of everything he’s done for us and the way he cares about Jonah and our family.”

Dr. Tse says Jonah was one of his very first patients when he started working at the hospital in Louisville two and a half years ago. After Jonah’s surgery, he continues to see the toddler every three to six months to check up on him.

“Every time I see him I’m amazed by well he’s doing,” Tse said. “I feel proud. I feel happy and grateful that together (with his family) we can help Jonah to become a healthy child.”

Bump says she recently bought her son a doctor kit to play with, and when Halloween came around, she thought it’d be the perfect idea to have her son dress up as someone who means so much to their family.

“It seemed like a good fit,” Bump said. “Everyone in our family has been Jonah’s patient and because of what Dr. Tse means to us we decided to combine the two.”

Bump dressed up Jonah exactly like Tse, including a white coat and Tse’s signature blue Oxford shirt he wears underneath the coat. They even replicated Tse’s hospital name tag to say “Tse Jr.”

When the costume was complete, she texted the picture to one of Tse’s transplant nurses and asked her to relay it to him. When Tse saw it, he said he was honored.

“He was like a mini-me,” Tse said. “I was touched. I was so surprised and I didn’t expect it. The costume looked like me down to the very last detail.”

Tse jokes that in 20 years he

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Egyptian NHS doctor stricken by Covid seeks visa reassurances from Home Office



a man holding a fish: Dr Basem Enany has thanked the more than 4,000 people who donated to a crowdfunder to pay for his legal and medical bills.


© Photograph: GoFundMe/PA
Dr Basem Enany has thanked the more than 4,000 people who donated to a crowdfunder to pay for his legal and medical bills.

An Egyptian NHS doctor who became critically ill after complications from contracting Covid-19, has spoken for the first time about his fears of being removed from the UK by the Home Office while he lay in his hospital bed on a ventilator.

Dr Basem Enany, a locum consultant cardiologist at York teaching hospital, had treated many coronavirus patients. He was placed on a ventilator after developing Guillain-Barré syndrome, a rare complication of Covid-19 and other viruses, which has left him partially paralysed. He can now breathe unaided but believes he has a long rehabilitation journey ahead of him.

“At first I had the usual symptoms of Covid – cough, fever, loss of taste and smell – but then I began to develop a weakness throughout my body. Then I was no longer able to move and couldn’t breathe properly.” he said. “I had never seen this happen in any of the Covid patients I had treated and had to research my symptoms as they were so unusual.”

He has a work visa that is due to expire next month. He and his wife, Marwa Mohamed, believe they and their four young daughters could face removal from the UK as he is unlikely to be well enough by December to renew the visa.

While Enany has regained partial use of his hands, his legs remain paralysed and he is waiting to be moved from Leeds general infirmary to a specialist neuro-rehabilitation facility. “I was not sedated on the ventilator and was lying awake in my hospital bed thinking: ‘Oh my God, my visa is about to finish,’” he said.

Enany thanked the dedicated NHS workers who have been looking after him and the more than 4,000 people who have made donations to a crowdfund that will pay for his legal and medical bills. Any remaining funds will be donated to research into Covid-19 and into Guillain-Barré syndrome.

While the Home Office has said it had no plans to deport the family, Enany does not know what kind of replacement visa he will receive, how long it will be for and whether it will allow work.

While Enany thanked the Home Office for its reassurances, he said: “We still don’t have any solid documents in our hands and my visa will expire soon.”

A Home Office spokesperson said: “We’ve spoken to Dr Enany’s family to reassure them that their immigration status is not in jeopardy and they are not facing enforcement action. They are here entirely legally and have every right to remain the UK. We will continue to work with them to find a way forward. Our thoughts remain with Dr Enany and his family at this difficult time.”

On Friday there will be the second reading of a private member’s bill from Liberal Democrat MP Christine Jardine calling for indefinite leave to remain to

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Intermittent Fasting Does Work for Weight Loss, Doctor Clarifies

There’s been a lot of talk about the effectiveness of popular weight-loss plan intermittent fasting. With many studies being done on this time-restricted eating plan, there’s also always new information being presented, but the end result is largely the same: intermittent fasting works for weight loss.

Recently, a study was published in JAMA that looked at time-restricted eating and its weight loss effects in both men and women. As the results were shared, some of the information seemed to get misconstrued, according to a doctor who now wants to clarify.

Monique Tello, M.D., MPH, a practicing physician at Massachusetts General Hospital, director of research and academic affairs for the MGH DGM Healthy Lifestyle Program, and clinical instructor at Harvard Medical School, was not involved in the study. But, she recently published a blog post on Harvard Health’s blog saying she had seen headlines about this study claiming that intermittent fasting doesn’t work and has a significant negative impact on muscle mass. She believes, though, that these research results have largely been misinterpreted. (Related: 5 Science-Backed Benefits of Intermittent Fasting.)

The original study tested 141 overweight patients over a period of 12 weeks. Some were put on a time-restricted eating plan while others followed a traditional eating plan. Dr. Tello points out that there was no true control group in the study because each patient was put on a schedule of some sort. A true control group would have been given no instructions or guidelines.

In the end, both groups lost weight, but the study showed that the intermittent fasting group lost more, including muscle mass that wasn’t identified in those on a traditional eating plan. But as Dr. Tello explains in her post, the study makes no mention about the quality of food both groups were eating.

“By the way, all of these folks may have been eating fried or fast foods, and sugary sodas and candy—we don’t know,” writes Dr. Tello in Harvard Health. “The study doesn’t mention quality of diet or physical activity. This isn’t how IF is supposed to be done! And yet the IF folks still lost between half a pound and 4 pounds.”

Plus, Dr. Tello notes that both groups were given a structured eating plan. Dr. Tello believes having a true control group, in which participants continued to eat as they normally would, could’ve made these research findings more conclusive.

She reiterated that the study did, in fact, show that intermittent fasting works for weight loss, it’s just that some of the results weren’t necessarily presented properly, and the study was, perhaps, a bit flawed in its setup.

“While this one negative study adds to the body of literature on IF, it doesn’t reverse it,” Dr. Tello writes in her post. “We simply need more high-quality studies in order to have a better understanding of how to most effectively incorporate IF into a healthy lifestyle.”

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Doctor accused of unnecessary surgeries, altering medical records defends himself as an ‘advocate for my patients’

NORFOLK —Javaid Perwaiz, the obstetrician-gynecologist accused of performing unnecessary sterilizations, billing for phantom medical procedures and inducing healthy pregnant women to deliver for his convenience, testified this week that he altered consent forms and changed due dates to benefit his patients, not line his pockets.

Perwaiz, who is charged with dozens of counts of health fraud, told jurors in U.S. District Court that he ignored congressionally mandated regulations requiring patients to wait 30 days after signing a sterilization consent form by having them sign an undated form. Instead, he backdated the forms, sometimes performing sterilizations within days of seeing a patient.

“Yes, I knew the 30-day requirement. I just couldn’t say no,” he said from the witness stand Thursday. “I’m an advocate for my patients.”

He said he performed the sterilizations in contradiction to the requirement to benefit his patients. Often, they had discussed sterilization with doctors who referred them. They told him, he testified, that their insurance would run out if he waited or that they could not get a ride or a babysitter on other dates. Asked during cross examination if he could name which of the patients in the indictments told him that their insurance was running out, Perwaiz could not.

Backdating forms is part of three broad categories of charges against Perwaiz. Prosecutors say he altered medical records to justify unnecessary surgery, often scaring women by mentioning the threat of cancer. They allege he changed due dates so he could induce women into labor on the Saturdays he was operating on other patients at Chesapeake Regional Medical Center. And they contend he billed insurers for office medical procedures done with broken equipment.

He is also charged with falsifying his application to health-care providers by omitting a felony conviction for tax fraud in 1996, which resulted in a brief suspension of his license, and failing to admit his loss of privileges at Maryview Hospital in 1983. Perwaiz, 70, has been jailed since his November arrest.

[doctor is accused of years of unnecessary hysterectomies. The women who trusted him want answers.]

In a full day of testimony, Perwaiz, led by defense lawyer Emily Munn, defended the care he gave to the two dozen patients named in the 61 counts against him. In case after case, she broadcast his medical charts and the form he filed with Chesapeake Regional Medical Center before surgery. The charts were identified by the initials of the women prosecutors charge he operated on unnecessarily — D.B., D.P., A.G., T.D.C., A.F., A.N. S.N., D.B.D — and by their age and the complaints they wrote down, which several women who testified previously said were false.

In case after case, Perwaiz explained that the complaints by the women — often pelvic pain, bleeding and cramping — justified his procedures. Often, he said, women asked him to be sterilized. In none of the cases of women named in the indictments, Perwaiz said, did he refer them to other doctors after finding evidence of cancer.

During cross examination

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Can SF survive the fall COVID-19 surge? UCSF doctor responds

The deadly fall COVID-19 surge health officials have been warning about for months has swept the United States and is being blamed in part on Americans not wearing masks, as well as the onset of cold weather that is forcing people indoors, where the virus can spread more easily.

The average number of new cases per day in the U.S. has soared more than 40% over the past two weeks, from around 49,000 to about 70,000. Deaths per day have climbed from about 700 to almost 800.

So far, San Francisco has steered clear of the surge as the city continues to control the virus with its residents wearing masks, businesses and schools reopening slowly and scientists and politicians collaborating on public health orders.


Can the city survive what some are calling the third wave?

“I’ll go out on a limb and say yes … and hope that I’m not proven wrong,” Dr. Bob Wachter, chair of the Department of Medicine at UCSF, wrote in one of his weekly Twitter threads on the COVID-19 pandemic.

Wachter said that he’s hopeful S.F. won’t experience a fall explosion in cases based on how the city has responded to the virus with vigilance since the start of the pandemic, when Mayor London Breed declared a local state of emergency.

“When I walk or drive around SF, I see evidence of why Covid cases & deaths are the lowest of any big city in the U.S. Masking is near universal, Ubers & Lyfts have their windows wide open, & there are pop-up outdoor eating spaces everywhere,” he wrote.

He added, “History is with us: when all of California began to surge in June, SF was able to turn it around – whereas much of the rest of CA didn’t and was hit far harder. Ditto for the southern states.”

Coronavirus cases are spreading across the United States like wildfire, with infections on the rise in every state but Virginia, according to covidexitstrategy.org. Deaths are up in 34 states.

The states seeing the highest rates of newly confirmed infections are mostly in the Midwest and the Plains.

California has seen an uptick in coronavirus-related hospitalizations and intensive care admissions in the past two weeks, prompting renewed warnings Tuesday from Gov. Gavin Newsom and the state’s top health official even as newly confirmed cases remain well below the recent surge across much of the nation.

Statewide, hospitalizations increased 4.7% over the past 14 days and intensive care cases are up 5.9% over the same period. That contrasts with more than a month of double-digit declines in both categories after the state retrenched this summer and

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Doctor goes clean-shaven for first time in 50 years

Dr Manoj Joshi, before and after. (SWNS)
Dr Manoj Joshi shaved his beard and moustache to raise funds for a polio. Here, before and after. (SWNS)

A doctor who shaved all his facial hair off for the first time in five decades to raise funds for a polio vaccine says his wife doesn’t recognise him.

While Dr Manoj Joshi, 68, had trimmed his beard before, he had not shaved his moustache since he was 16 years old.

Joshi’s wife said she she’d never seen him without facial hair before in the 42 years they had been married.

A member of Rotary International, a humanitarian service whose goal is to advance goodwill and peace around the world, Dr Joshi has been involved in what he calls “acts of giving” for his entire life.

Dr Manoj Joshi, before his shave. See SWNS story SWLEmoustache; A man who shaved his moustache to raise funds for a polio vaccine says his wife can’t even recognise him - after he trimmed it for the first time in 52 YEARS. Dr Manoj Joshi, 68, says he had never shaved his moustache ever since he could grow one as a fresh faced 16-year-old but decided to chop it all off in a bid to “eradicate polio”. But after he chopped it off his shocked wife said she couldn’t recognise him as she’d never seen him without it in the 42 years they had been married. The grandfather-of-two joked that it would take a lawn mower to trim his luscious facial hair - which is older than the invention of the mobile phone. Dr Joshi, a proud Rotarian, which is a worldwide charitable society with over a million members worldwide, has been involved in what he calls “acts of giving” for his entire life. On World Polio Day (Saturday, Oct 24) he took centre stage at a park in front of Bradford City Hall to shave off his beloved moustache in an “emotional day”.
Dr Manoj Joshi, 68, has not shaved since he was 16 years old but decided to chop it all off for the cause on World Polio Day. (SWNS)
Dr Manoj Joshi, 68, shaved his moustache for the first time in 52 YEARS at Bradford City Hall to raise funds to eradicate polio. See SWNS story SWLEmoustache; A man who shaved his moustache to raise funds for a polio vaccine says his wife can’t even recognise him - after he trimmed it for the first time in 52 YEARS. Dr Manoj Joshi, 68, says he had never shaved his moustache ever since he could grow one as a fresh faced 16-year-old but decided to chop it all off in a bid to “eradicate polio”. But after he chopped it off his shocked wife said she couldn’t recognise him as she’d never seen him without it in the 42 years they had been married. The grandfather-of-two joked that it would take a lawn mower to trim his luscious facial hair - which is older than the invention of the mobile phone. Dr Joshi, a proud Rotarian, which is a worldwide charitable society with over a million members worldwide, has been involved in what he calls “acts of giving” for his entire life. On World Polio Day (Saturday, Oct 24) he took centre stage at a park in front of Bradford City Hall to shave off his beloved moustache in an “emotional day”.
Dr Manoj Joshi took centre-stage at a park in front of Bradford City Hall to have his beard and moustache shaved off. (SWNS)

On Saturday, World Polio Day, he took centre-stage at a park in front of Bradford City Hall to shave off his beloved moustache.

He was nervous and said he’d miss his beard, which was painted purple as an homage to how immunised children had their little finger dyed purple.

When a child receives their polio drops on mass polio immunisation days, their little finger is painted with a purple dye so it is clear they have received the vaccine.

Watch: Wild Polio wiped out in Africa

Read more: Top scientist who battled COVID-19 says we will never live normally without vaccine

Dr Joshi, from Bradford, West Yorkshire, hopes to raise awareness and funds for the Rotary Foundation’s End Polio Now campaign – and has so far raised nearly £4,000.

He said: “It was such an emotional day for me because this cause means the world and if we can eradicate polio and make sure no child is at risk – it will be a great day.

“We are so close and I think we need to keep doing all we can to push over the final stretch.

“For me, it’s very strange to be without my moustache which I’ve had for 52 long years – but shaving it off is nothing compared to what we are fighting for.

Collect photo of Dr Manoj Joshi as a young man. See SWNS story SWLEmoustache; A man who shaved his moustache to raise funds for a polio vaccine says his wife can’t even recognise him - after he trimmed it for the first time in 52 YEARS. Dr Manoj Joshi, 68, says he had never shaved his moustache ever since he could grow one as a fresh faced 16-year-old but decided to chop it all off in a bid to “eradicate polio”. But after he chopped it off his shocked wife said she couldn’t recognise him as she’d never seen him without it in the 42 years they had been married. The grandfather-of-two joked that it would take a lawn mower to trim his luscious facial hair - which is older than the invention of the mobile phone. Dr Joshi, a proud Rotarian, which is a worldwide charitable society with over a million members worldwide, has been involved in what he calls “acts of giving” for his entire life. On World Polio Day (Saturday, Oct 24) he took centre stage at a park in front of Bradford City Hall to shave off his beloved moustache in an “emotional day”.
Dr Manoj Joshi as a young man. (SWNS)
Dr Manoj Joshi, 68, shaved his moustache for the first time in 52 YEARS at Bradford City Hall to raise funds to eradicate polio. See SWNS story SWLEmoustache; A man who shaved his moustache to raise funds for a polio vaccine says his wife can’t even recognise him - after he trimmed it for the first time in 52 YEARS. Dr Manoj Joshi, 68, says he had never shaved his moustache ever since he could grow one as a fresh faced 16-year-old but decided to chop it all off in a bid to “eradicate polio”. But after he chopped it off his shocked wife said she couldn’t recognise him as she’d never seen him without it in the 42 years they had been married. The grandfather-of-two joked that it would take a lawn mower to trim his luscious facial hair - which is older than the invention of the mobile phone. Dr Joshi, a proud Rotarian, which is a worldwide charitable society with over a million members worldwide, has been involved in what he calls “acts of giving” for his entire life. On World Polio Day (Saturday, Oct 24) he took centre stage at a park in front of Bradford City Hall to shave off his beloved moustache in an “emotional day”.
The 68-year-old says that his wife struggled to recognise him after going under the chop. (SWNS)

“The barber told me he would need a lawnmower to shave it all off – but thankfully he managed in just 30 minutes.

“It was light-hearted fun but there is a profound importance to this. These causes are so close to my heart.

“But I do feel very weird and strange now without my beard and moustache.

“You don’t normally keep something for half a century but my moustache has always been there.”

While there hasn’t been a case of polio caught

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