Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine Partners With MANRRS to Increase Diversity in Veterinary Profession

Pet owners represent a much more diverse population than the veterinary professionals who care for them and their animals, a gap the American Veterinary Medicine Association (AVMA)1 and the Association of American Veterinary Colleges (AAVMC) 2 are working hard to fill. Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine (RUSVM) is committed to being part of the solution and is proud to announce a new partnership with Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources and Related Sciences (MANRRS). This collaboration will further RUSVM’s long-term commitment to increase diversity in the veterinary profession and strengthen the pipeline of highly qualified, diverse students pursuing an education in veterinary medicine.

The partnership will introduce RUSVM to MANRRS chapters across the U.S. with MANRRS members gaining access to exclusive webinars and virtual workshops from RUSVM to increase exposure to the profession. Additionally, qualified students may apply for a newly launched MANRRS scholarship. The partnership will also help establish a professional chapter of MANRRS at RUSVM that will create mentoring opportunities for current RUSVM students and enhanced networking opportunities. To learn more about this partnership, click here.

“It is vitally important that the field of veterinary medicine is representative of the communities that we serve, and Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine is thrilled to take this important step toward increasing diversity in the field,” said Sean Callanan, MVB, CERTVR, MRCVS, PHD, FRCPATH, DIPLECVP, dean of Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine. “As one of the most ethnically diverse AVMA-accredited veterinary schools, the partnership with MANRRS will provide new opportunities for prospective, current and former students, and pave the way for a more diverse workforce.”

According to an American Veterinary Medicine Association (AVMA) report, more than one-third of African Americans surveyed own a pet. However, the vast majority of practicing veterinarians in the U.S. are white3, highlighting a disparity in the diversity of the profession and the people that they serve.

“While facing the dismal reality that more than 85% of Veterinarians are white, MANRRS is committed to partnering with RUSVM to provide underrepresented students access to pursue a career in veterinary medicine,” said Ebony Webber, chief operating officer for MANRRS. “Provided that MANRRS is one of the only and largest organizations focused on diverse talent in agriculture, our student and professional members expect MANRRS to advocate for diversity, equity, and inclusion in areas where minorities are needed to help solve the world’s biggest challenges relating to animal health.”

RUSVM, supported by its parent company, Adtalem Global Education, is committed to cultivating a culture of diversity and inclusivity and creating a diverse global workforce that reflects that culture. To learn more about Adtalem’s commitment to diversity and inclusion, click here.

About Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine

Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine (RUSVM) is an institution of Adtalem Global Education (NYSE:ATGE, member S&amp, P MidCap 400 Index)). Founded in 1982, RUSVM is committed to preparing students to become members and leaders of the worldwide public and professional healthcare team and to advance human, animal and

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Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine Partners With MANRRS to Increase Diversity in Veterinary Profession – Press Release

BASSETERRE, St. Kitts–(Business Wire)–Pet owners represent a much more diverse population than the veterinary professionals who care for them and their animals, a gap the American Veterinary Medicine Association (AVMA)1 and the Association of American Veterinary Colleges (AAVMC) 2 are working hard to fill. Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine (RUSVM) is committed to being part of the solution and is proud to announce a new partnership with Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources and Related Sciences (MANRRS). This collaboration will further RUSVM’s long-term commitment to increase diversity in the veterinary profession and strengthen the pipeline of highly qualified, diverse students pursuing an education in veterinary medicine.

The partnership will introduce RUSVM to MANRRS chapters across the U.S. with MANRRS members gaining access to exclusive webinars and virtual workshops from RUSVM to increase exposure to the profession. Additionally, qualified students may apply for a newly launched MANRRS scholarship. The partnership will also help establish a professional chapter of MANRRS at RUSVM that will create mentoring opportunities for current RUSVM students and enhanced networking opportunities. To learn more about this partnership, click here.

“It is vitally important that the field of veterinary medicine is representative of the communities that we serve, and Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine is thrilled to take this important step toward increasing diversity in the field,” said Sean Callanan, MVB, CERTVR, MRCVS, PHD, FRCPATH, DIPLECVP, dean of Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine. “As one of the most ethnically diverse AVMA-accredited veterinary schools, the partnership with MANRRS will provide new opportunities for prospective, current and former students, and pave the way for a more diverse workforce.”

According to an American Veterinary Medicine Association (AVMA) report, more than one-third of African Americans surveyed own a pet. However, the vast majority of practicing veterinarians in the U.S. are white3, highlighting a disparity in the diversity of the profession and the people that they serve.

“While facing the dismal reality that more than 85% of Veterinarians are white, MANRRS is committed to partnering with RUSVM to provide underrepresented students access to pursue a career in veterinary medicine,” said Ebony Webber, chief operating officer for MANRRS. “Provided that MANRRS is one of the only and largest organizations focused on diverse talent in agriculture, our student and professional members expect MANRRS to advocate for diversity, equity, and inclusion in areas where minorities are needed to help solve the world’s biggest challenges relating to animal health.”

RUSVM, supported by its parent company, Adtalem Global Education, is committed to cultivating a culture of diversity and inclusivity and creating a diverse global workforce that reflects that culture. To learn more about Adtalem’s commitment to diversity and inclusion, click here.

About Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine

Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine (RUSVM) is an institution of Adtalem Global Education (NYSE: ATGE; member S&P MidCap 400 Index). Founded in 1982, RUSVM is committed to preparing students to become members and leaders of the worldwide public and professional healthcare team and to advance

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First Diversity Week at Stanford Medicine tackles tough topics in medical education, health care | News Center

People are a composite of many interconnected identities, Lassiter said, and taking an “intersectional” point of view is helpful in assessing how diverse, equitable and inclusive a workplace is. As an example, Lassiter described a case study of a particular organization that touted the number of women and people of color in their workforce. 

 The “statistics sound great on the surface, but … when we look at the data from an intersectional perspective, we see that the women in the organization are mostly white women, and the largest group of men in their organization is white men,” Lassiter said. 

 “When organizations say, ‘We’ve increased our numbers of women,’ who are those women?” Lassiter said. Similarly, when groups claim, “’We’ve increased our numbers of people of color,’ who’s included in [their definition of] people of color?” These are the questions that the framework of intersectionality helps us address, Lassiter said.

Diversity, equity and inclusion in medical education

We have to be willing to employ the same kind of rigor we apply to studies of science and medicine to efforts designed to eliminate bias and racism and promote diversity and inclusion, several speakers said.

In 2017, a 10-month program called Leadership, Education and Advancing Diversity, or LEAD, was created to pair Stanford Medicine residents and fellows with mentors who are Stanford Medicine faculty or educational administrators. 

“I had no idea how impactful this work would be,” Carmin Powell, MD, clinical assistant professor of pediatrics, told attendees at the Diversity and Inclusion Forum on Oct. 9. Powell co-directs LEAD with Lahia Yemane, MD. 

Every month, LEAD’s participants take part in discussion-based lectures on various topics related to equity, diversity and inclusion. They also work with their mentors to develop a presentation to deliver at the annual Diversity and Inclusion Forum.

 In just four years, LEAD has tripled in size, growing from 30 scholars and mentors to more than 100, Powell said. Part of the program’s success is its engagement with medical residents and fellows early in their careers, making equity, diversity and inclusion a part of their training.

Knowledge is key

Educating yourself on the history of racism and how to foster diversity and inclusion is essential, said Marc Nivet, executive vice president for institutional advancement at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and keynote speaker at this year’s Diversity and Inclusion Forum.

“If you get nothing else out of today’s talk, I would just implore you to read and to get educated,” Nivet said. 

“You can no longer be an effective leader, period — not just in academic medicine — but period, without being much more elevated in your ability to understand these issues,” he said. “And that comes from reading and learning.”

Learning, trying new things and sharing what does — and doesn’t— work is important for progress, Nivet explained. “I think we don’t share the results of failure, which is typical in academic medicine. We don’t get points for writing about failures or initiatives that didn’t work and why

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College of Human Medicine student receives Diversity in Medicine Scholarship | MSUToday

College of Human Medicine student Michelle Walls is the first recipient of a Diversity in Medicine Scholarship under a program created by Dr. Mehmet Oz to inspire future doctors in underserved communities.

Walls learned she would receive the scholarship during an appearance on “The Dr. Oz Show,” which aired Nov. 25. Due to COVID-19, the second-year student appeared on the program through a virtual link. She was under the impression she was only a finalist for the scholarship until Oz announced she was the actual recipient.

“I was really caught off guard,” she said. “It was a perfect surprise.”


College of Human Medicine student Michelle Wallw

 

It was perfect, not only because it recognizes her many volunteer activities and the obstacles she overcame to become a medical student, but also because the $10,000 scholarship goes a long way toward covering her tuition.

The scholarship is part of a broader campaign called More Black Doctors that Oz, a cardiothoracic surgeon and Columbia University professor, founded to encourage more African Americans to become physicians, particularly in underserved communities. Applicants must be undergraduates or in medical school and show a commitment to serve their communities and tackle health inequities.

After applying and undergoing a series of interviews, Walls clearly met the program’s criteria.

“I was so inspired by your dedication, yet you never give up,” Oz told Walls. “One of the things that inspired me about you is you’ve already been out there trying to pass it along, trying to change each other and how we practice medicine.”

Asked what advice she would give others considering a career in medicine, Walls said, “I would say to them to not give up, because for me, my journey wasn’t straight. It definitely wasn’t easy. I heard a lot of ‘no’s’. So you’ve got to put those ‘no’s’ behind you and find someone who tells you that you still can.”

When she was 6 years old, her father died. Three years later, she and her three younger siblings were placed in Detroit-area foster homes because their mother was unable to care for them. When she turned 18, Walls aged out of her third foster home and was on her own.

Struggling with obesity, she embarked on a healthy diet and exercise program and shed the extra pounds. She then founded a nonprofit, Lifestyle Fitness Empowerment Inc., to encourage others to achieve better health through proper nutrition and exercise.

“I basically felt better about myself, and I wanted to show other people how they could do it,” she said.

 After graduating from MSU, Walls was accepted in the College of Human Medicine. She volunteers at a Lansing homeless shelter and with the Spartan Street Medicine, a program run by the Colleges of Human Medicine and Osteopathic Medicine to serve homeless people in Ingham County.

“A lot of it is just talking to them and helping them with whatever they’re going through,” Walls said.

Part of her mission is to share her own story, hoping it is an inspiration for others who might think medical

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Moderna hails diversity of Covid trial participants

Biotech firm Moderna said Thursday that it had successfully recruited ethnic minorities, older people and those with underlying health issues for its Covid-19 vaccines trial, after it pushed to enrol groups most vulnerable to the virus.

Moderna said it had now signed up all 30,000 participants for the phase-3 trial, and more than 25,000 of them had already received a second dose of the vaccine, four weeks after the first.

The firm said it was working “to develop a vaccine for everyone, including communities that have historically been under-represented in clinical research and are disproportionately impacted by Covid-19.”

More than 7,000 people taking part in the trial are over 65, and more than 5,000 under 65 have high-risk diseases such as diabetes, severe obesity and cardiac disease.

The firm said more than 11,000 are “from communities of color, representing 37 percent of the study population and similar to the diversity of the US at large” — 6,000 are Hispanic or Latino, and more than 3,000 are African-American.

Massachusetts-based Moderna is one of the few companies to have launched a large-scale clinical trial less than 10 months after the genetic sequencing of the novel coronavirus was established.

Some Chinese, Russian and other Western projects are also in advanced tests, including US firm Pfizer.

Moderna hopes to have sufficient results by the end of November and to then file an emergency authorization request with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

The company has already said it was aiming to file for authorization soon after November 25, with Pfizer at the third week of November.

The US government says it will distribute the first doses immediately after authorization free of charge.

Health Secretary Alex Azar said Wednesday there would be enough doses to vaccinate the “most vulnerable” Americans before the end of the year, then the elderly and health workers in January, and all Americans by early April.

In the trials, half of the volunteers receive a placebo, and the other half get the vaccine.

Initial FDA guidance stipulated that if the number of participants in the vaccinated group naturally contracting the virus and falling ill with Covid-19 was at least 50 percent lower than in the placebo group, the vaccine would be declared effective.

But on Thursday, a National Institutes of Health official said during a meeting of the FDA’s advisory committee on vaccines that they would require a 60 percent efficacy for emergency use.

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Karmanos Cancer Institute Launches Diversity and Inclusion Committee

Karmanos Cancer Institute Launches Diversity and Inclusion Committee

PR Newswire

DETROIT, Oct. 19, 2020

DETROIT, Oct. 19, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute is pleased to announce the launch of a Diversity and Inclusion Committee. Led by this committee, Karmanos will integrate best practices in diversity, inclusion and cultural competence to deliver outstanding and equitable medical care to the patients we serve and provide a welcoming and supportive environment for staff members.

“Diversity at Karmanos has always been an organizational strength,” says Justin Klamerus, M.D., MMM, president, Karmanos Cancer Hospital & Network.
“Diversity at Karmanos has always been an organizational strength,” says Justin Klamerus, M.D., MMM, president, Karmanos Cancer Hospital & Network.

Justin Klamerus, M.D., MMM, president, Karmanos Cancer Hospital & Network will serve as executive sponsor of the local committee with Kay Carolin, chief nursing officer, as the chair.

“Diversity at Karmanos has always been an organizational strength,” said Dr. Klamerus. “To enhance its power, we must continue to educate and embrace culture shifts, seek ways to improve, stay present and bridge gaps in care for our patient population. This cannot be done by the local committee alone. We will align with the McLaren Health Care corporate council and seek engagement from staff to empower the community we serve.”

The Diversity and Inclusion Committee is comprised of members from many different areas of the organization from leadership and administration to clinical staff and researchers. They will hold their first meeting on October 19, 2020. In addition to core members, the committee will work with department leaders in identifying staff members to participate in initiatives to broaden the scope of voices and ideas.

Karmanos’ Health Equity Book Club
In alignment with the organization’s increased focus on diversity and inclusion and to encourage open conversation about inequity, Karmanos has launched a Health Equity Book Club. The purpose of this quarterly program is to educate health care providers on the history of systemic racism in medicine and to set the stage for developing strategies and interventions to eliminate the impact of racial inequities in medical practice and society. This will be done through the reading and discussion of texts that explore a range of topics related to equity in health care.

“Karmanos encourages everyone to learn more and support our community. Doing so makes us better caregivers, colleagues and individuals,” said Michael Simon, M.D., MPH, co-leader of the Breast Cancer Multidisciplinary Team and creator of Karmanos’ Health Equity Book Club.

For more information and to register for the first virtual dialogue session on Thursday, October 22, 2020, from 4 – 5:30 p.m., visit www.karmanos.org/bookclub.

“No time is soon enough for us to heighten our long-standing commitment to diversity and inclusion. Through open conversation, vulnerability and education, we can take steps that will allow us to better understand our patients, our colleagues and ourselves,” said Dr. Simon.

A history of diversity and inclusion
While the formalization of a Diversity and Inclusion committee and the Health Equity Book Club are new additions, Karmanos has long been committed to serving diverse populations. Through

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Art and medicine essays explore diversity, bias, suffering

It’s a thought-provoking prescription for reflection and learning, and you don’t have to be an artist or a clinician to enjoy it.

Every Monday, the project sends subscribers an email that includes a piece of art work and a short essay that delves into challenging themes that connect the art to medicine. The essays are reflective and wide-ranging, covering uncertainty, death, suffering, salvation and more. Each is accompanied by a list of sources so that readers can learn more.

One recent newsletter included a reflection on permanence and the participation of AIDS patients in their own care tied to “Strange Fruit,” an installation by artist Zoe Leonard that was exhibited at the Philadelphia Museum of Art in 1998. Another featured Henri Rousseau’s “Woman Walking in an Exotic Forest” and tied it to questions of colonialism and diversity in medicine.

In a reflection on Horace Pippin’s 1940 painting “Supper Time,” the team reflects on cultural bias. Pippin, a Black artist who used his work to reflect on racism and slavery, regularly had his work branded as “primitive” and “tribal” by art critics. The essay connects the art world’s disquieting reception to Pippin’s work to clinicians’ implicit biases and the use of terms like “noncompliant” or “unmotivated” to describe patients.

“We’re trying to weave an interesting multidisciplinary lens of clinical medicine and anthropology and social justice,” Lyndsay Hoy, assistant professor of clinical anesthesiology and critical care at Penn Medicine and the co-creator of the project, told the Daily Penn.

Sign up to receive the weekly email yourself — or just tool around the intriguing list of themes the consortium has already explored — at rxmuseum.org.

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