Giving Voice: New dentist is making big difference at Oasis

When we temporarily closed the dental clinic in March, we understood the profound impact it would have on our patients’ oral health. Most of our patients have moderate to severe dental issues, requiring several visits to address the multiple issues that have impacted their ability to smile, eat, and sleep. Lack of fluoridated water, inability to pay for services, and years of deferred or delayed care are just some of the root causes for the dental issues our patients experience. Our patients rely on our free services to address dental issues and alleviate pain so that they can get back to their jobs and families.

We also knew that when it was safe to re-open the dental clinic, we might not have dentists who could volunteer with us, at least not immediately. Those in private practice are focused on keeping their businesses going, meaning they often work on Fridays – the day most volunteer at Oasis. Because many of our volunteer dentists are over 60 and in the high-risk category, we weren’t sure if they would return. As a result, and for the first time in our history, we hired a staff dentist for eight hours per week to provide care to our patients. This, it turns out, has been one of the best things to come out of the pandemic.

Dr. Flo Edwards started in early September and jumped quickly into action, providing almost $12,000 in free dental care during her first six weeks. She has delivered a wide array of dental services – comprehensive exams, extractions, and fillings – and our patients have been thrilled to have access to dental care again. My office is down the hall from the dental suites, and I have a front row seat to their smiles and calls of, “Thank you!” as they leave the clinic.

Being a dentist wasn’t necessarily the plan for Dr. Edwards. Growing up in Portland, she wasn’t sure what she wanted to do. She headed to college in Illinois where she got a degree in biology and economics, minoring in classical studies. She had the prerequisites for medical or dental school and shadowed her parents’ dentist. But, teaching had appeal, and Dr. Edwards got her teaching certification from the University of New England. She taught at Bonny Eagle High School and worked at Spurwink for a while.

Dentistry, however, was still on her mind, and Dr. Edwards applied to dental school. Howard University’s College of Dentistry was at the top of her list. As a Black girl growing up in Maine, she had grown used to standing out and assimilating to those around her. The opportunity to attend a Historically Black University was a chance to be a part of and learn in a community with other Black students. As a daughter of a veteran, Dr. Edwards also decided to apply to the Army Officer Candidate School (OCS). As fate would have it, Dr. Edwards was accepted into both OCS and dental school. Through good advice and

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The Biggest Difference Between a Vaccine and a Treatment

Photo credit: Anadolu Agency - Getty Images
Photo credit: Anadolu Agency – Getty Images

From Men’s Health

As the coronavirus continues to shake the country without proven medications to fight the novel disease, doctors and scientists are racing for a breakthrough in developing both vaccines and treatments.

But as dozens of COVID-19 vaccines enter advanced clinical trial stages and the FDA approves possible treatment drugs (such as Remdesivir) and continues to review others, we’ve noticed that there’s confusion around what a vaccine does and what a treatment does.

The biggest difference between a vaccine and a treatment is that one is designed to prevent, while the other is designed to treat or cure. Both, however, would be beneficial when it comes to preventing and managing COVID-19.

Vaccines: What they are and what they do

A vaccine is a product that stimulates the immune system to produce immunity to a specific disease without you ever having to get the disease first, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For example, the flu shot is a vaccination that works to prevent a person from getting sick from influenza by rallying the immune system against the viruses that cause the flu.

Photo credit: Men's Health
Photo credit: Men’s Health

Treatments: What they are and what they do

Treatments, on the other hand, come into play after an individual is already sick. They work to help those that are sick survive and recover.

Dr. Davey Smith, head of the Division of Infectious Disease and Global Health at UC San Diego, says that while vaccines for COVID-19 are important, treatments are still crucial. “The FDA said they will approve a coronavirus that works 50 percent of the time,” he explains. “I still have a 50% chance of getting sick. And I really need to have a [treatment] that’s going to keep me from getting sicker and perhaps dying.”

Ultimately, establishing both vaccines and treatments during the pandemic is vital as COVID-19 continues to spread.

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Ways To Help On Make A Difference Day In Clearwater

CLEARWATER, FL — The fourth Saturday of every October is National Make A Difference Day, when good works take center stage as volunteers nationwide and all over the globe set aside some time to help others.

With the coronavirus pandemic causing unprecedented hardships in 2020, donating to, or helping at, food banks and food pantries can be even more important this year. Make A Difference Day — celebrated this year on Saturday, Oct. 24 — is an ideal time to volunteer at one of them.

Just one hour of volunteer work with Feeding Tampa Bay generates exponential meals to feed neighbors in need.

“We’ve now moved from a crisis to a new normal,” said Thomas Mantz, president and CEO of Feeding Tampa Bay. “What we’d all thought to be a temporary situation has now materially changed the way we live. COVID has dominated the world of social services for longer than any of us would have imagined – and will continue to do so.

“Throughout the last six months, one thing is certain – our community stepped up for our neighbors in need more than ever before,” Mantz said. “Our volunteers jumped in to provide heroic service. Our agency partners battled hunger, putting millions of meals back into our community. Our donors increased their generosity exponentially. Our staff team worked tirelessly to innovate creative solutions to meet the need head-on. We completely changed our model to Mega Pantry Drive-Thru grocery distributions and began delivering meals directly to those who need it most. Trinity Cafe pivoted their efforts to provide prepared to-go style meals. And our warehouse team feverishly processed millions of pounds of food weekly.”

During the coronavirus pandemic, Mantz said Feeding Tampa Bay doubled its output to nearly two million meals distributed weekly for an anticipated total of 85 million meals served this year. The nonprofit also increased its monthly mobile pantries to 150, four times the amount before the pandemic and increased to-go-style meals from 500 to 40,000.

Metropolitan Ministries helps homeless and at-risk children and families, whether they need to get off the streets at night or they’re seeking education so they can get a job that will support their family.

These services are vital for the 32,000 homeless men, women and children in Tampa Bay.

“The scope of need is unprecedented,” said Tim Marks, Metropolitan Ministries’ president and CEO. “We’ve been so fortunate to have the communities’ support, and I have faith that we’ll rally together once again to meet this challenge.”

Here Are Some Ways To Make A Difference

Feeding Tampa Bay needs volunteers are needed to sort nonperishable goods in the warehouse at 4702 Transport Drive, Building 6, Tampa, or serve breakfast Saturday from 9 to 10 a.m. at the Trinity Cafe, 2202 E. Busch Blvd. and 2801 N. Nebraska Ave. in Tampa.

You can help Metropolitan Ministries by going through your closets and gathering clothes and shoes you no longer need to be dropped off at the Metropolitan Ministries Thrift Store,

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What’s the Difference Between a Dentist and an Orthodontist? Part 2

This follows on from a previous article explaining the simple difference between dentists and orthodontists in terms of other subjects like doctors and surgeons and police officers and detectives. This article outlines the types of work that dentists and orthodontists do.

Years ago, hundreds of years ago, dentistry was a fairly unsophisticated subject. It required good physical skill, but the range of treatments available was fairly small – if your tooth was badly hurting, you saw someone to take it out. There weren’t any anaesthetics, so if you were lucky, the dentist took out the tooth quickly, and it didn’t break on the way out, and it didn’t hurt too much, and if you were very lucky he took out the correct tooth first time.

There wasn’t the option of modern fillings or root treatments, or gum treatments. There weren’t even antibiotic medicines to stop infections and abscesses. In fact, dental infections were a significant cause of death in the middle ages. Back then, a lot of dentistry, like a lot of surgery, was carried out by barbers, who had a good collection of blades and steel instruments.

Eventually dentistry moved on. More treatments were developed and some teeth could be saved. Advances in anaesthetics meant that more work could be done on teeth without upsetting the patients. After a while examinations were brought in to make sure that the people carrying out dentistry were fit to do so and this helped protect the public from poor dentists.

Over the years dentistry became even more advanced. Nowadays, a dentist would leave dental school and expect to know about:

  • Fillings
  • Crowns
  • Bridges
  • Veneers
  • Tooth whitening
  • Implants
  • Root treatments
  • Gum diseases
  • Jaw muscle problems
  • Problems involving the lining of the mouth, including the tongue, and including monitoring for mouth cancer
  • Dentures
  • Dental Surgery
  • Children’s dentistry
  • Orthodontics
  • Dental X-Rays
  • Medical problems related to dentistry
  • Dental problems related to medicine
  • Medications needed to treat dental problems

That’s a lot to stay on top of, and it also is a lot of instruments to keep in order to provide all of these treatments, so many dentists tend to concentrate on the areas that interest them most. The area I know best is orthodontics, and here are some of the areas of orthodontics that orthodontists need to think about when planning, organising, and carrying out treatment for a patient:

  • Invisible braces (like INVISALIGN))
  • Tooth coloured braces (like DAMON CLEAR)
  • Metal Fixed Braces (train tracks like DAMON Q or MX)
  • Lingual Braces (Braces on the inside of the teeth)
  • Removable braces
  • Retainer braces
  • Twin block braces
  • Headgear braces
  • Developing teeth
  • Extra teeth (supernumerary teeth)
  • Missing teeth
  • Teeth with abnormal roots
  • Teeth in an abnormal position
  • Abnormal jaw bone
  • Abnormal tooth shape
  • Abnormal jaw sizes
  • Abnormal gums
  • How the growth of the face and jaws will affect the treatment
  • How to tell if a patient’s face is still growing
  • If the patient needs surgery for the teeth
  • If the patient needs surgery for the jaws
  • If the patient
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The Mental Health of Families That Have a Child With a Disability: 10 Things That Make a Difference

There is a lot of information and activities designed to increase awareness and understanding of mental health issues and to reduce the stigma that often goes along with it.

What about the mental health of families that have a child with a disability?

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), mental health is defined as "a state of well-being in which every individual realizes his or her own potential, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to make a contribution to her or his community.

Your mental health is affected by numerous factors from your daily life, including the stress of balancing work with your health and relationships. " (Canadian Mental Health Association)

While most parents will say that their child has brought tremendous joy to their lives, it is no secret that the responsibility of having a child with a disability is way beyond the normal stresses of everyday life.

Over the years, I have had the privilege of speaking to many parents. Overwhelmed, exhausted, isolated, afraid, anxious, worried, sad, stressed, upset, angry, frustrated, drained, weakened and shattered are but a few emotions that parents say the experience each and every day.

There are options which provide families with a short break such home support and respite programs however the funding for these programs is relatively minimal compared to the number of hours that parents devote to the care of their child.

Lack of sleep, frequent visits to the doctor or hospital, interrupted careers, strained relationships, dropped friendships, and financial pressure are all examples of the constant and non-stop stress that a family goes through.

Not to mention the attitudinal barriers that families encounter in places at school, the playground, the hospital, the restaurant, the sports team and the list goes on.

Furthermore, parents are not very good at asking for help. In her book, Daring Greatly, Dr. Brené Brown states that "going it alone is a value we hold in high esteem in our culture." She also states that "For some reason we attach judgment to receiving help." I know that my husband and I were reluctant to receive help when it was initially offered and yet looking back, there was absolutely no way we could have done it without the support from our family, friends and funded assistance.

We are informed about the destructive effects on our health from sleep deprivation, chronic stress and secondary traumatic stress disorder as it relates to people on shift work and professional caregivers however we do not ever hear about the devastating effects on families that have a child with a disability.

The Mayo Clinic explains that the long-term effects of chronic stress can disrupt almost all your body's processes. This increases the risk of many health problems, including, anxiety, depression, digestive problems, headaches, heart disease, sleep problems, weight gain and memory and concentration impairment.

What can be done to preserve the mental health of families that have a child with a …

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The Difference Between a Dentist and an Orthodontist

Accessing the best dental care can be a bit of a challenge sometimes. There are many dentists around and each of them claims to be providing the best of services. There are also some other dental health practitioners called orthodontists. You probably think that everyone who deals with teeth is a dentist. Quite on the contrary, you probably do not need the services of a dentist but rather an orthodontist. Not everybody knows what orthodontists do anyway.

Generally, orthodontists and dentists have the same agenda as far as your health is concerned. This is to enhance your oral health. However, the ways that they do this are the difference. As you might know, dentistry is not a small field but one with a whole lot of branches within it. It is also worth mentioning that a dentist can also be an orthodontist but you need not be told that not all dentists are licensed as orthodontists as well.

The similarities

The major comparison between a dentist and an orthodontist is that they both focus on your dental healthcare. An orthodontist may work in a dental office and provide the same care as a dentist. In this case, they perform the same duties. In short, they are both doctors who deal with teeth and gums.

The world of differences

For starters, orthodontists spend a lot of more time in school as a dentist specialty. It is the same thing with surgeons as they go through some few more years in school. Orthodontists normally concentrate on helping patients with teeth alignment. They fix the bite and alignment of the teeth. This might be through the use of tools such as braces and Invisalign.

Dentists mainly promote good oral hygiene and provide services relating to tooth decay, root canals, gum disease, crowns, veneers, tooth whitening, and bridges. On the other hand, orthodontists are dentists who mostly focus on the alignment of teeth and give services such as fixing misaligned teeth, crowded teeth and overbite or underbite.

Which specialist to visit

Getting to know the differences between the two profession helps you save a lot of time when you are looking for a specific procedure to be done on your teeth. So if your teeth are to be aligned, you know you have to go to an orthodontist and if you just want a dental checkup, you go to a dentist who will be able to take care of your daily dental needs. Dentists are able to treat just about any kind of dental issue and that is why they are the more popular of the two. However, you might also benefit greatly from the specialized care provided by orthodontists.

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Direct Primary Care and Concierge Medicine – What’s the Difference?

The Difference Between Concierge Medicine and Direct Primary Care

Direct primary care (DPC) is a term often linked to its companion in health care, ‘concierge medicine.’ Although the two terms are similar and belong to the same family, concierge medicine is a term that fully embraces or ‘includes’ many different health care delivery models, direct primary care being one of them.

Similarities

DPC practices, similar in philosophy to their concierge medicine lineage – bypass insurance and go for a more ‘direct’ financial relationship with patients and also provide comprehensive care and preventive services for an affordable fee. However, DPC is only one branch in the family tree of concierge medicine.

DPC, like concierge health care practices, remove many of the financial barriers to ‘accessing’ care whenever care is needed. There are no insurance co-pays, deductibles or co-insurance fees. DPC practices also do not typically accept insurance payments, thus avoiding the overhead and complexity of maintaining relationships with insurers, which can consume as much as $0.40 of each medical dollar spent (See Sources Below).

Differences

According to sources (see below) DPC is a ‘mass-market variant of concierge medicine, distinguished by its low prices.’ Simply stated, the biggest difference between ‘direct primary care’ and retainer based practices is that DPC takes a low, flat rate fee whereas omodels, (although plans may vary by practice) – usually charge an annual retainer fee and promise more ‘access’ to the doctor.

According to Concierge Medicine Today (MDNewsToday), the first official news outlet for this marketplace, both health care delivery models are providing affordable, cost-effective health care to thousands of patients across the U.S. MDNewsToday is also the only known organization that is officially tracking and collecting data on these practices and the physicians — including the precise number of concierge physicians and practices throughout the U.S.

“This primary care business model [direct primary care] gives these type of providers the time to deliver more personalized care to their patients and pursue a comprehensive medical home approach,” said Norm Wu, CEO of Qliance Medical Management based in Seattle, Washington. “One in which the provider’s incentives are fully aligned with the patient’s incentives.”

References and Sources

“Doc This Way!: Tech-Savvy Patients and Pros Work Up Healthcare 2.0”. New York Post. 4/7/2009.

Who Killed Marcus Welby? from Seattle’s The Stranger, 1/23/2008

“Direct Medical Practice – The Uninsured Solution to the Primary Medical Care Mess” with Dr. Garrison Bliss (Qliance Medical Group of WA).

“Direct Primary Care: A New Brew In Seattle”. Harvard Medical School – WebWeekly. 2008-03-03.

DPCare.org

Qliance.com

ConciergeMedicineToday.com

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Difference Between a Cosmetic Dentist and a Regular Dentist

Dental science has gone through lots of changes with time. A few decades back, dentistry was only limited to the treatment of decayed teeth, which were either filled or removed by the dentist. But as the time progressed and people became more conscious about their looks, cosmetic dentistry came in to play. Nowadays, it is common to use veneers and braces for enhancing the appearance of teeth. Botox treatment is equally popular with people, though many heath experts still debate on whether it should be covered under dental science or not? Despite all the debate about the purpose of cosmetic dentistry and its effect on the health of the patient, we can’t deny that it has become one of the most popular treatments of modern times. In this article, we will learn about the basic difference cosmetic and regular dentistry.

The term cosmetic dentistry came in vogue with the popularity of TV and cinema culture. It was observed that most of the celebs have a beautiful smile and people were curious to know how all of them managed to have such white and well-formed teeth. Later, it was found out that this was the magic of cosmetic dental treatment. This made it popular and since then, cosmetic dentistry methods are being frequently used by common man.

As per definition, dentistry includes everything that is concerned with oral care and thus, we can say that cosmetic dentistry too is a part of regular density. The only difference which can be pointed out here is that unlike regular tooth job, cosmetic dentistry is not done for health reasons. It is more to do with enhancement of looks and therefore, the word ‘cosmetic’ is used to describe it.

Cosmetic dentistry is a branch of dental science and till a few decades back, it was not acknowledged separately. But as it became more and more popular with time, some dentist realized that it is much more lucrative to market themselves cosmetic dentists as most of the cosmetic dental treatment procedures were quick and made good money. Therefore, some dentist consciously started to promote themselves as cosmetic dentist specialists.

So, as such, there is no difference between regular and cosmetic dentistry apart from the fact that is makes more money for some dentists! It is better to search for an experienced and reputed dentist than to look out for a cosmetic dentist as the former is likely to perform all kinds of dental job on your in better way.

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