78-year-old Paul McCartney’s fitness routine: yoga headstands and diet

At 78, Beatles co-founder Paul McCartney is still working, writing new music and, until the Covid-19 pandemic hit, performing in concerts. In 2019, McCartney grossed just over $100 million on solo shows, according to Forbes.

One strategy that helps the septuagenarian stay active as he ages? A fitness routine. McCartney described his approach to wellness on a recent episode of the podcast “Smartless,” hosted by Jason Bateman, Sean Hayes and Will Arnett.

“I have a very definite routine,” McCartney explained on the podcast. But he doesn’t have a personal trainer, “it’s just me,” he said.

First, “I get on the mat, and I do a bunch of stuff there,” McCartney said. For example, he said he stretches his legs and uses a foam roller.

“Then, I move over to a cross-trainer,” also known as an elliptical machine, McCartney said. Sometimes he will “do a bit of running” for added cardio.

In total, McCartney said he spends about five or ten minutes on each segment of his workout. “It’s not a huge workout, but it’s good. I like it,” he said.

McCartney’s “favorite bit” of his workout is a headstand that he does to finish his circuit. The musician regularly practices yoga with a group of friends, including actor Alec Baldwin, that he calls “The Yoga Boys,” he said. (A representative for Baldwin did respond to CNBC Make It’s request for comment.)

“If I’m in a gym and all the big guys have got big weights and they’re doing all the big stuff, at the end I do a headstand,” he said. “And they come over to me [and say], ‘That’s pretty impressive man.'”

Yoga and meditation have been part of McCartney’s routine since his Beatles days. In the ’60s, The Beatles famously helped popularize Transcendental Meditation, a form of meditation that involves sitting for 20 minutes twice a day and repeating a mantra.

As the story goes, George Harrison’s wife, Patti Harrison, suggested that the band meet with Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, an Indian spiritual guru who was known for introducing Transcendental Meditation to the West. McCartney has referred to meditation as “a lifelong gift.”

“Whenever I have a chance in a busy schedule, I’ll do it, if I’m not rushing out the door with some crazy stuff to do,” he wrote in a 2015 blog post.

Today, Transcendental Meditation is a proprietary practice taught by certified teachers. Hedge fund billionaire Ray Dalio took up Transcendental Meditation after hearing about the benefits from The Beatles. And fellow billionaire Oprah Winfrey is also a fan of the practice.

McCartney said on the podcast that his vegetarian diet is another way he stays in shape.

McCartney has been a vegetarian since the late ’70s, long before plant-based diets were trendy. “You can get loads of vegetarian options these days, so it’s not like it was like in the old days when you just got the boiled sprout,” he said in an interview with Wired published in September 2018. 

In addition to going to

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Fitness queen Kayla Itsines, 29, reveals the typical daily diet that keeps her lean all year round

Fitness queen and CEO of the Sweat empire Kayla Itsines has offered a look at her typical daily diet, and revealed why she doesn’t believe you should deprive yourself of any specific food group if you want to get lean fast.

The 29-year-old from Adelaide said she is a huge subscriber to the motto ‘a little of everything in moderation’, and so while she seeks to remain slim, she also doesn’t deprive herself of the foods she loves.

Kayla said she mainly follows a Mediterranean-style diet that is packed full of Greek foods from her heritage.

‘This means a wide variety of vegetable and fruit as snacks, and a good mix of vegetables, protein and carbohydrates in my meals,’ she wrote on her website.

Kayla said she also eats more than you might expect, because she is eating to ‘fuel’ her body for a day of workouts and training clients. 

Fitness queen and CEO of the Sweat empire Kayla Itsines (pictured) has offered a look at her typical daily diet

Fitness queen and CEO of the Sweat empire Kayla Itsines (pictured) has offered a look at her typical daily diet

The 29-year-old (pictured) from Adelaide said she is a huge subscriber to the motto 'a little of everything in moderation' and she follows a Mediterranean diet with plenty of Greek foods

The 29-year-old (pictured) from Adelaide said she is a huge subscriber to the motto ‘a little of everything in moderation’ and she follows a Mediterranean diet with plenty of Greek foods

BREAKFAST 

For breakfast, Kayla said if she’s at home, she’ll often have ‘a lot of vegetables with two pieces of toast’.

This could be foods like tomatoes, capiscum, cucumber and avocado, which are all then drizzled with extra Virgin olive oil, fresh basil, dried oregano and salt and pepper.

‘I eat my toast with olive oil (yes, that’s even more olive oil – what can I say, I’m Greek!) as I prefer it to butter,’ the 29-year-old said. 

Kayla added that she is lactose intolerant and so tries to limit her intake of dairy where possible.

She’ll add a cup of Turkish coffee to her breakfast at home.

If she’s out, Kayla said she loves to order scrambled eggs with chilli with a side of chilli kale as she ‘loves’ spicy food.

She is also known to get sauteed mushrooms, tomatoes and avocado with toast and a piccolo latte with dairy-free milk.

Lunch for the busy 29-year-old is 'really simple', and her go-to dish is a tuna salad packed full of vegetables (pictured)

Lunch for the busy 29-year-old is ‘really simple’, and her go-to dish is a tuna salad packed full of vegetables (pictured)

'It's a healthy lunch you can make in under five minutes - just chop up the vegetables and basil and put them in your bowl, add tuna and dressing and you're good to go!' Kayla (pictured) said

‘It’s a healthy lunch you can make in under five minutes – just chop up the vegetables and basil and put them in your bowl, add tuna and dressing and you’re good to go!’ Kayla (pictured) said

LUNCH

Lunch for the busy 29-year-old is ‘really simple’, partly because she is often in the middle of working and needs to grab something healthy but delicious as quickly as possible.

‘If I’m at home, I’ll often make a quick tuna salad,’ Kayla said.

To replicate her go-to dish, all you need is some canned tuna, brown rice, fresh basil, cucumber, tomato, capsicum and red onion.

Kayla’s dressing is olive oil, dried oregano, balsamic vinegar, salt and cracked pepper.

‘It’s a healthy lunch you can make in under five

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Can a Healthier Diet Affect Survival in Patients With Metastatic Colorectal Cancer?

A prospective study examining links between diet quality and survival of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) found no link between diet at the initiation of first-line treatment and overall survival.

For the study, Erin Van Blarigan, ScD, of the University of California San Francisco, and colleagues assessed “validated food frequency” questionnaires completed by 1,284 of 2,334 patients (55.0%) with metastatic CRC enrolled in the Cancer and Leukemia Group B (Alliance)/Southwest Oncology Group 80405 trial. The results, published online in JAMA Network Open, found no significant association in overall survival and any of five dietary patterns:

  • Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI), which is scored from 0 to 110 and is based on vegetables (excluding potatoes), fruits, whole grains, nuts and legumes, long-chain n-3 fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, sweetened beverages and juice, red and processed meat, trans fat, sodium, and alcoholic drinks
  • Alternative Mediterranean Diet (AMED), which is scored from 0 to 9 and is based on vegetables, fruits, nuts, whole grains, legumes, fish, ratio of monounsaturated to saturated fat, red and processed meat, and alcohol
  • Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, which is scored from 0 to 45 and is based on fruits, vegetables, nuts and legumes, low-fat dairy, whole grains, sodium, sweetened beverages, red and processed meats, and sweets and desserts
  • The Western dietary pattern, characterized by higher intake of dairy, refined grains, condiments, red meat, and sweets and desserts

“Making lifestyle changes is hard, especially when you are dealing with cancer diagnosis and treatment,” Van Blarigan told MedPage Today. “Patients may wish to focus their energy on making changes that are most likely to be helpful. Data on diet and exercise in people with metastatic colorectal cancer are very limited, but the information we have right now suggests that patients should really prioritize exercise during and after their cancer treatments.”

Overall, none of the diet scores or patterns examined were associated with survival in metastatic CRC, the investigators reported. “We observed an inverse association between the AMED score and risk of death (HR quintile 5 [Q5] vs quintile 1 [Q1] 0.83, 95% CI 0.67-1.04, P=0.04 for trend), but point estimates were not statistically significant. Additionally, the Western diet pattern was associated with longer survival in individuals with KRAS variant tumors (HR Q5 vs Q1 0.50, 95% CI 0.32-0.77) but not those with wild-type tumors (HR Q5 vs Q1 0.95, 95% CI 0.68-1.33, P=0.02 for interaction).”

“None of the other diet scores or patterns were associated with survival, overall or in subgroups, and the results did not change when patients who died within 90 days after administration of the [questionnaire] were excluded,” the team noted.

Writing in an accompanying commentary, Cindy Kin, MD, MS, of Stanford University School of Medicine in California, pointed out that although a Western diet, high in red meat and saturated fats, has been linked to the development of colorectal cancer, the new study addresses the less well-studied area of diet quality and outcomes in CRC, particularly for those with

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Central Ohio nonprofit’s ‘Farmacy in the City’ program in South Linden to combine diet, medicine

Editor’s note: This story has been updated to correct the number of patients served by the Charitable Pharmacy and which government agency gave it $1.5 million to renovate the building where it is opening a second location.



a sign on the side of the road: Site of the former Eagle Supermarket, 1464 Cleveland Ave., on Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2020 in Columbus, Ohio. The Charitable Pharmacy of Central Ohio and Community Development for All People will open a pharmacy and fresh-food market at the site of the former South Linden carryout, which the city shut down in 2016. The "Farmacy in the City" will open in Spring 2021.


© Joshua A. Bickel/Columbus Dispatch
Site of the former Eagle Supermarket, 1464 Cleveland Ave., on Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2020 in Columbus, Ohio. The Charitable Pharmacy of Central Ohio and Community Development for All People will open a pharmacy and fresh-food market at the site of the former South Linden carryout, which the city shut down in 2016. The “Farmacy in the City” will open in Spring 2021.

The Charitable Pharmacy of Central Ohio will open a second location addressing low-income Franklin County residents’ food and pharmaceutical needs with its “Farmacy in the City” program. 

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The nonprofit’s new site, co-located with Community Development for All People, will feature a pharmacy and fresh food market under one roof. Here, vulnerable Franklin County residents can receive non-narcotic prescription medicine, pharmacy services and healthy food at no cost. 

“Our patients may not have access to healthy food and other resources that you need to stay in those healthy habits to reduce your disease burden,” Charitable Pharmacy executive director Jennifer Seifert said. “We’re really excited now that when someone says, ‘I don’t know what to eat,’ we can bring some resources around them.”

Since 2010, CPCO has contributed $50 million in pharmacy services and prescription medicine, today serving over 7,000 Franklin County residents living at or below 200% of the federal poverty level.

More: Charitable Pharmacy sees more patients, more costs due to COVID-19

CPCO’s model is different from that of free clinics. Pharmacists spend time with patients to understand their medical history, explain the impact of their prescribed medicine and create an action plan for the future, development director Melanie Boyd said.

Despite this decade of positive impact, it’s clear that sometimes medicine isn’t the most pressing need when patients walk through the pharmacy’s doors. Basic needs such as food, shelter and clothing often take precedence. 

After receiving a grant of nearly $100,000 from the Franklin County Board of Commissioners in 2019, CPCO began exploring communities where its support could have the most impact and identified South Linden as a place where it could help the neighborhood achieve better health outcomes.



A rendering of the completed renovations for the Charitable Pharmacy of Central Ohio's fresh market. Slated to open spring 2021, the "farmacy" will be located at 1464 Cleveland Ave. in South Linden in a former Eagle Market.


© Charitable Pharmacy of Central Ohio
A rendering of the completed renovations for the Charitable Pharmacy of Central Ohio’s fresh market. Slated to open spring 2021, the “farmacy” will be located at 1464 Cleveland Ave. in South Linden in a former Eagle Market.

The unfortunate truth is that one’s ZIP code often determines the quality of their health care.

“You go to the suburbs and look at how many pharmacies you have per capita — it’s a real different story in some other sections of the city,” Boyd said. “We know that coming in (to South Linden) as a charitable pharmacy to work with the existing pharmacies, we’re going to be able to meet

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Acne Medicine is Not As Effective As Changing Your Diet For Healing Acne

Acne medicines only treat the symptoms of acne. They do not remove the cause of acne. Acne is caused from toxins being eliminated through your skin. Some acne medicine can have very harsh side effects.

Are you willing to risk damaging your skin with these sometimes dangerous drugs?

The good news is that you can cure your acne by changing your diet like I have, without using any type of acne medicine at all. Years ago I tried using different types of acne medicines to try and fix my skin, but they didn't work.

At the time I believed it when I read that eating an unhealthy diet does not cause acne. I now know that eating foods that are not compatible with your genetics definitely causes acne. When you are on the proper non-allergenic diet, you will not need to buy any more expensive acne medicine.

Acne medicine will not change your genetics. Not all people are the same. Some people might digest certain foods well without causing acne. Other people might be slightly allergic to that same food, and it can cause them to break out with acne. Remember: people have different genetics and come from different parts of the world.

Trains planes and automobiles have mixed up the food supply of the world and made it possible for people to have almost any food from any part of the world available to them.

Just because you can eat a food without it instantly killing you, does not mean that it is the best food for you with your unique genetics. Every animal on the planet has its own species-specific diet.

If you want to fix your skin without using acne medicine, than you will have to stop eating the foods that are causing your acne in the first place. Also certain combinations of foods can react with each other and form substances that your body will react negatively to.

Remember back in high school in chemistry class? When we would mix a bunch of chemicals together? Sometimes they would have a dramatic chemical reaction, and turn into a totally different substance. Have you seen the Mentos and Diet Coke experiments on Youtube, where the combination of the two makes an explosive reaction and sprays soda way up into the air? If you haven't already, you should see it. Just Google it.

What do you think happens if you eat Mentos and Diet Coke at the same time? If you have gas pains, then you are probably eating the wrong combinations of foods at the same meal.

There are many other foods and food additives that people eat on a regular basis that are turning into toxic chemicals when mixed together, that the body then has to get rid of. If your body has to, it will just send the toxins strait through your skin for rapid elimination, and taking acne medicine is not going to stop the toxins from being eaten in the first place.

Acne medicines …

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