Dentist’s warning after healthy dad-of-seven who didn’t drink or smoke dies aged 37

A dentist has warned that thousands of Brits may be unknowingly living with mouth cancer after a “healthy” dad-of-seven died from the disease.

Alan Birch, 37, lived a healthy, active lifestyle and did not drink or smoke but died from an aggressive form of mouth cancer in April.

The self-employed plasterer, from Wirral in Merseyside, was diagnosed with mouth cancer in 2018, and had to have 90 per cent of his tongue removed, Liverpool Echo reports.

Despite Alan undergoing both radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the cancer returned each time and specialists told his devastated family there was nothing more they could do for him.

Alan and his partner of 12 years, Debbie McDonough, decided to get married in February, but he tragically died a few weeks later in April.

Dad-of-seven Alan Birch died of mouth cancer in April

Alan lived a healthy, active lifestyle and did not drink or smoke

With the latest figures from the British Dental Association showing that 19 million treatments have been missed due to lockdown, dentists are now concerned about the number of cases of mouth cancer that will have potentially gone undiagnosed this year as a result.

Mouth cancer takes more lives than cervical cancer and testicular cancer combined, with 8,722 new cases reported in the UK last year. This is a 58 per cent increase compared to a decade ago and a 97 per cent rise since 2000.

Debbie said: “I would urge people to always keep on top of their dentist appointments as they are the ones who notice the warning signs for mouth and tongue cancer.

“Always be careful of ulcers especially if you have them longer than two weeks, and never think you are wasting an appointment if you are worried about anything. It’s better to be safe than sorry.”

Alan had 90 per cent of his tongue removed when he was diagnosed with mouth cancer in 2018

New research revealed that 52 per cent of people living in the North-West are unaware their dentist will screen them for mouth cancer during a routine check-up.

Dr Catherine Tannahill, dentist and director of clinical dentistry at Portman Dental Care, which carried out the research, said: “As dentists we see first-hand the impact this disease can have, and that’s why we want to ensure people are aware of what the signs and symptoms are, what to do if they spot an issue and what steps they can take to reduce the risk of developing mouth cancer.

“This is now more important than ever before, as thousands of diagnoses may have potentially been missed this year due to dental practices having to close in initial lockdown, and the subsequent backlog of appointments since.

“While this may sound alarming, early diagnosis of mouth cancer leads to a 90 per cent survival rate, which is why it is imperative that people continue visiting their dentist for regular check-ups.

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Dentist’s warning after ‘healthy and active’ dad dies at aged 37

A healthy dad of seven who died after being diagnosed with an aggressive type of mouth cancer has led to warnings from dentists.

Alan Birch was just 35 when he had 90% of his tongue removed as a result of the disease in 2018. His cancer diagnosis came as a shock, as he lived a healthy, active lifestyle and did not drink or smoke.

Alan, from Moreton in Merseyside underwent both radiotherapy and chemotherapy, but despite the treatment, the cancer returned each time – and even more aggressively.

His devastated family were then faced with the news that there was nothing more that could be done for him, giving him just months to live.

Alan died in April, just weeks after marrying his partner of 12 years, Debbie McDonough.

His wife Debbie told the ECHO at the time: “I would urge people to always keep on top of their dentist appointments as they are the ones who notice the warning signs for mouth and tongue cancer.

“Always be careful of ulcers especially if you have them longer than two weeks, and never think you are wasting an appointment if you are worried about anything. It’s better to be safe than sorry.”

His tragic case has now prompted concerns that thousands of cases are going undiagnosed.

While figures from the British Dental Association show that 19 million treatments have been missed due to the coronavirus pandemic and the subsequent lockdowns.

Dentists are now concerned that large numbers of cases of mouth cancer could have potentially gone undetected this year as a result.

Mouth cancer claims more lives annually than cervical cancer and testicular cancer combined, with 8,722 new cases reported in the UK last year. This is a 58% increase compared to a decade ago and a 97% rise since 2000.

But research states there is still a chronic lack of awareness and knowledge surrounding this type of cancer – and dentists are keen to rectify this.

New research revealed that 52% of people living in the north west are unaware their dentist will screen them for mouth cancer during a routine check-up. This figure was highest with those aged between 25-35, increasing to 61%.



a man and a woman sitting at a table: Alan Birch, who was diagnosed with terminal cancer of the mouth, signs the marriage register with his long-term partner - now wife - Debbie McDonough


© Joe Hague Photography
Alan Birch, who was diagnosed with terminal cancer of the mouth, signs the marriage register with his long-term partner – now wife – Debbie McDonough

Dr Catherine Tannahill, dentist and director of clinical dentistry at Portman Dental Care, which carried out the research, said: “As dentists we see first-hand the impact this disease can have, and that’s why we want to ensure people are aware of what the signs and symptoms are, what to do if they spot an issue and what steps they can take to reduce the risk of developing mouth cancer.

“This is now more important than ever before, as thousands of diagnoses may have potentially been missed this year due to dental practices having to close in initial lockdown, and the subsequent backlog of appointments since.

“While this

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Dentist issues warning after ‘healthy’ dad dies at 37

The tragic case of a Wirral dad-of-seven who lost his battle with an aggressive form of mouth cancer has led to concerns that thousands of cases are going undiagnosed.

Alan Birch, 37, had 90% of his tongue removed when he was diagnosed with mouth cancer in 2018.

Despite Alan undergoing both radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the cancer returned each time and specialists told his devastated family there was nothing more they could do for him.

The news was even more shocking as Alan, a self-employed plasterer from Moreton, lived a healthy, active lifestyle and did not drink or smoke.

It was after learning of the devastating diagnosis that Alan and his partner of 12 years, Debbie McDonough, decided to get married. The wedding ceremony in February was attended by more than 150 family and friends.

Debbie said at the time: “Usually the cancer he has is curable, but he got it in a very aggressive form. Every time they operated, it came back worse.”



a group of people posing for the camera: Dad-of-seven Alan Birch, pictured with his partner Debbie


© Liverpool Echo
Dad-of-seven Alan Birch, pictured with his partner Debbie

After winning hearts across Merseyside, sadly Alan died a few weeks later in April.

Mouth cancer takes more lives than cervical cancer and testicular cancer combined, with 8,722 new cases reported in the UK last year. This is a 58% increase compared to a decade ago and a 97% rise since 2000.



a man and a woman sitting at a table: Alan Birch and Debbie McDonough on their wedding day in February


© Joe Hague Photography
Alan Birch and Debbie McDonough on their wedding day in February

With the latest figures from the British Dental Association showing that 19 million treatments have been missed due to lockdown, dentists are now concerned about the number of cases of mouth cancer that will have potentially gone undiagnosed this year as a result.

But there is still a lack of awareness and knowledge around this type of cancer – something which dentists are keen to continue to try and rectify.

This comes as new research revealed that 52% of people living in the north-west are unaware their dentist will screen them for mouth cancer during a routine check-up. This figure was highest with those aged between 25-35, increasing to 61%.

What are the latest coronavirus figures for where you live? Find out by adding your postcode.

Dr Catherine Tannahill, dentist and director of clinical dentistry at Portman Dental Care, which carried out the research, said: “As dentists we see first-hand the impact this disease can have, and that’s why we want to ensure people are aware of what the signs and symptoms are, what to do if they spot an issue and what steps they can take to reduce the risk of developing mouth cancer.

“This is now more important than ever before, as thousands of diagnoses may have potentially been missed this year due to dental practices having to close in initial lockdown, and the subsequent backlog of appointments since.

“While this may sound alarming, early diagnosis of mouth cancer leads to a 90% survival rate, which is why it is imperative that people continue visiting their dentist

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Builder, 45, dies in prison days before facing trial for murdering fitness trainer girlfriend

Builder, 45, dies in prison days before facing trial for murdering his ‘beautiful and kind’ ex-army fitness trainer girlfriend, 26

  • Terence Papworth was charged with murder of Amy-Leanne Stringfellow in June
  • The mother-of-one was found critically injured at his flat in Doncaster on June 5
  • Papworth, 45, a builder, was due to face trial over Amy’s death on November 30 
  • He was found dead in his cell at Armley Prison in Leeds on Sunday, November 22 

A builder has died in prison days before he was due stand trial for the alleged murder of his ‘beautiful and kind’ girlfriend.

Terence Papworth, 45, was charged with the murder of mother-of-one Amy-Leanne Stringfellow, 26, in June.

Ms Stringfellow, who served in Afghanistan, was found critically injured in Papworth’s home in Balby, Doncaster, South Yorkshire, on June 5 this year.

Emergency services battled to save the fitness trainer, but she was declared dead at the scene.

Papworth was charged with her murder two days later and was due to stand trial next week.

However, he was found dead in his cell at Armley Prison, in Leeds, West Yorkshire, on Sunday.

Terence Papworth, 45, was charged with the murder of mum-of-one Amy-Leanne Stringfellow, 26, in June and was due to stand trial later this month

He was found dead in his cell at Armley Prison, in Leeds, West Yorkshire, on Sunday ahead of the trial, following Amy's (pictured) death

Terence Papworth (pictured left), 45, was charged with the murder of mum-of-one Amy-Leanne Stringfellow (pictured right), 26, in June and was due to stand trial later this month. He was found dead in his cell at Armley Prison, in Leeds, West Yorkshire, on Sunday

Papworth was found dead in his cell at Armley Prison (pictured), in Leeds, West Yorkshire, on Sunday

Papworth was found dead in his cell at Armley Prison (pictured), in Leeds, West Yorkshire, on Sunday

Papworth had recently appeared in court via video link for a case management hearing and was due to stand trial on November 30 at Sheffield Crown Court.

The Ministry of Justice said: ‘Terence Papworth died in HMP Leeds on 22 November.

‘The Prisons and Probation Ombudsman has been informed.’

Papworth and Ms Stringfellow, who has a young daughter, had been in a relationship since last October but they had not moved in together.

She had travelled the four miles from her home in Doncaster to see Papworth during lockdown.

After her death, South Yorkshire Police referred itself to the Independent Office for Police Conduct (IOPC) over prior contact they had with Ms Stringfellow.

Private Stringfellow enlisted in the Army in 2010 and completed assignments with 3rd Battalion the Rifles 3 RIFLES in Edinburgh and Chilwell.

She also served a tour of duty in Afghanistan in 2012 as part of the Operation Herrick 16 deployment.

Amy-Leanne Stringfellow, 26, was found critically injured at a house in Doncaster in June. She died a short while later, despite efforts to save her

Amy-Leanne Stringfellow, 26, was found critically injured at a house in Doncaster in June. She died a short while later, despite efforts to save her

Papworth was charged with murder and appeared at Doncaster Magistrates' Court in June. He was due to stand trial on November 30

Papworth was charged with murder and appeared at Doncaster Magistrates’ Court in June. He was due to stand trial on November 30

Amy had been promoted to Lance Corporal but was discharged before taking up the post.

The fitness fanatic rejoined as a Volunteer Reservist in 2017 and also worked as a personal trainer.

Tributes

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Man almost dies from an allergic reaction to cold air

Stepping out of a hot shower into a cold bathroom almost killed a Colorado man, who had developed a serious allergic reaction to cold temperatures.



a close up of a toy: Person wearing a mitten adjusting a radiator thermostat.


© Provided by Live Science
Person wearing a mitten adjusting a radiator thermostat.

The 34-year-old old man collapsed after getting out of the shower, and his family found him on the floor, according to a report of the case published Oct. 27 in The Journal of Emergency Medicine. The man was struggling to breathe and his skin was covered in hives. He was experiencing a life-threatening, whole-body allergic reaction known as anaphylaxis.

When paramedics arrived, his family told them that the man had a history of being “allergic to the cold weather,” according to the report. He had previously experienced hives as a reaction to the cold, but not anaphylaxis. These episodes started after he moved from Micronesia, which has a tropical climate, to Colorado, which sees colder temperatures, the report said.

Related: The 9 weirdest allergies 

Paramedics treated the man with epinephrine and oxygen, and rushed him to the emergency room. When he got to the hospital, he was sweating profusely and had hives all over his body.

Doctors diagnosed him with cold urticaria, an allergic reaction of the skin after exposure to cold temperatures, including cold air or cold water, according to the Mayo Clinic. People can also develop symptoms after consuming cold food or drinks, Live Science previously reported.

The most common symptom is a red, itchy rash (hives) after exposure to the cold; but in more serious cases, people can develop anaphylaxis, which can cause their blood pressure to plummet and airways to narrow, making breathing difficult. These more severe reactions typically occur with full-body skin exposure to the cold, such as when people swim in cold water, the Mayo Clinic says. In the man’s case, his entire body was exposed to cold air after stepping out of his shower. 

Gallery: Glassified brain cells found in victim of Vesuvius eruption (Live Science)

Doctor’s confirmed the man’s diagnosis using an “ice cube test,” which involves placing an ice cube on the skin for about 5 minutes. If the patient develops a raised, red bump on the skin where the ice cube was, they are diagnosed with cold urticaria.

Exactly how common the condition is overall is not known — one study in Europe found a prevalence of 0.05%, according to the National Institutes of Health. Anaphylactic reactions are less common than hive-like reactions.

In most cases, the cause of the condition is not known, but sometimes it can be inherited, meaning people have a genetic predisposition. In other people, cold urticaria is triggered by something that affects the immune system, such as a viral infection or certain cancers.

The allergic reaction happens because exposure to the cold causes the immune system to release chemicals called histamines, which trigger an inflammatory response, Live Science previously reported.

At the hospital, the man was treated with antihistamine and steroids, and his condition improved. Before he

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Black Resident Dies After Childbirth, Highlights Tragic Trend

Chaniece Wallace, MD, a chief pediatric resident at the Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis, died on October 24 after complications from preeclampsia 4 days after giving birth prematurely by cesarean delivery, according to her husband, Anthony Wallace.

Their daughter, Charlotte Wallace, was born on October 20 weighing 4.5 pounds. She entered care in the neonatal intensive care unit.

Anthony Wallace told Chaniece’s story on a GoFundMe page, writing: “On October 20th, 2020 [Chaniece’s] doctors informed us that she was developing symptoms of preeclampsia.” He added that she had a ruptured liver and high blood pressure and that her kidney function was declining.

“Chaniece fought with every piece of strength, courage, and faith she had available,” he continued.

In announcing Wallace’s death, Riley Hospital for Children wrote that “it is with grievous and broken hearts that we announce the loss of one of our beloved friends, colleagues, and co-chiefs.” Chaniece “suffered postpartum complications after delivering a healthy 35wk baby girl. [S]he received excellent care at her delivery hospital by a complete and equally devastated healthcare team.”

Fellow co–chief resident Eric Raynal, MD, told Medscape Medical News that Chaniece’s preeclampsia “developed unusually rapidly. It was captured immediately and was especially severe,” he said.

“I think everyone in our community and the medical community that took care of her while hospitalized is at a loss for why her case of preeclampsia was so severe and did not improve after she delivered her baby, Charlotte,” he said.

“As physicians, we try to find answers and reason for everything we do in our practice of medicine, and it is so immensely frustrating when families ask us to explain things that are unexplainable,” Raynal said.

The statement from Riley Hospital said Wallace had completed her pediatrics residency in June and was beginning to explore career options as a general outpatient pediatrician.

“[H]er future impact, sure to be expansive, was taken away from her all too suddenly,” the announcement said.

Black Women at Triple the Risk for Maternal Death

Clinicians commented on social media that Wallace’s death highlights a grim statistic in healthcare in the United States: Black, Native American, and Alaska Native women are two to three times more likely to die from pregnancy-related causes than White women, according to recent Centers for Disease Control data.

Newborn hospitalist Shawnté James, MD, mourned Wallace’s death on Twitter, saying, “Childbirth isn’t safe for Black Women in America. This is crushing.”

Rachel Vreeman, MD, added: “Heart-broken over a new loss: a female pediatrician at a great academic medical center, with the same terrible pregnancy complication that I had. Except she is Black and she died.”

Raynal said, “What we know and can verify is that preeclampsia is more common in Black women. We would not say Chaniece’s preeclampsia and preeclampsia in women in general is ‘preventable.’ “

Raynal said Wallace was well aware of her risk and that they had talked privately about it routinely. She had also discussed the risks with her medical team.

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Irving McPhail, new president of St. Augustine’s University, dies of COVID-19

Several people associated with the HBCU gathered outside his residence to pay their respects to the educator

Dr. Irving P. McPhail, who took over as president of St. Augustine’s University this summer, died earlier this month just days after testing positive for coronavirus. He was 71.

McPhail became the 12th president of St. Augustine’s on July 15, succeeding Dr. Everett Ward as head of the private historically black college in Raleigh, North Carolina.

Several students and faculty members of the school have gathered outside McPhail’s residence to honor the short-lived president, local newspaper The News & Observer reports.

Dr. Irving P. McPhail
Dr. Irving P. McPhail

In September, McPhail went into self-quarantine after being exposed to someone with coronavirus, the fast-spreading novel virus that causes the COVID-19 disease that been attributed to more than 1 million deaths around the globe in less than a year. This prompted him to give his Sept. 17 SAU fall convocation via a pre-recorded message, according to Richmond Free Press.

READ MORE: Fauci advocates mask mandate amid COVID-19 surge across US

McPhail first reported experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 on the weekend of Oct. 3 and was later taken to WakeMed Health and Hospitals, a health-care system in the capital area. An email from the university was sent out on Oct 12 saying that McPhail was “recovering” after “receiving expert care and treatment at a local hospital.”

The letter continued by reiterating that McPhail did not come into contact with COVID-19 while he was on the SAU campus and that he been taking every precaution whenever on campus.

“President McPhail has been a strong proponent of face coverings and social distancing. He has regularly communicated with the campus community about SAU’s COVID-19 protocols and expectations, through both formal and informal channels,” the message said.

READ MORE: Monica Roberts, trailblazing trans rights reporter, has died

James Perry, the chair of St. Augustine’s board of trustees, says McPhail stayed home and took over-the-counter medicine in the early stages of his quarantine, unaware if he had contracted the virus at the time. The late president was hospitalized after having trouble breathing.

Perry said that McPhail initially showed signs of improving health during his hospital stay, but his condition worsened as time went on.

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The post Irving McPhail, new president of St. Augustine’s University, dies of COVID-19 appeared first on TheGrio.

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Mom-Of-Four Dies At 31 After Cancer Treatment Canceled During Coronavirus Lockdown

Coronavirus pandemic has resulted in diagnoses and treatments being put on hold or delayed, resulting in the deterioration or even death of several patients. One such patient was a woman battling brain cancer who died after her chemotherapy was paused during the coronavirus lockdown in the United Kingdom.

The woman, identified as 31-year-old Emma Jenkinson, was suffering from grade 4 brain cancer, a condition she had previously beaten in her early 20s.

Her treatment was put on hold after the pandemic hit the country in March this year. Her condition deteriorated and she died earlier this month, leaving her four children and husband behind.

“She has grade four brain cancer and unfortunately her chemotherapy was paused in March due to covid19, before this, the cancer was reacting well to treatment,” her husband Andrew wrote on a GoFundMe page set up to raise funds for the woman’s family.

“At the beginning of May, Emma started feeling really unwell. She started losing her balance, falling over. At its worst she was falling 15-20 times a day. She actually fell over in the garden quite heavily and banged her head on a post so I had to rush her to A&E. It was later in the month she had a scan and found that the cancer had increased and was placed on chemotherapy straight away,” he added.

Her condition deteriorated in September.

“Unfortunately in September she started getting pressure in her head and feeling unwell again and after another scan she was told that the chemotherapy has stopped working,” he wrote.

They were then informed by the doctor that her surgery cannot be conducted as it will cause lot damage and affect her quality of life.

She died the following month. 

Calling her a “fantastic mother,” Andrew wrote, “All Emma wants like any mother is for her children to be healthy & happy in the future. All she wants is for the children to have happy memories of her and us all together.”

cancer chemo In this photo, patient receives chemotherapy treatment for breast cancer at the Antoine-Lacassagne Cancer Center in Nice on July 26, 2012. Photo: Reuters/Eric Gaillard

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Brazilian dies in COVID-19 vaccine trial [Video]

A volunteer in a clinical trial of the COVID-19 vaccine being developed by Astrazeneca and Oxford University has died in Brazil.

Brazil’s health authority said on Wednesday that although the volunteer had died, the trial would continue.

So far 8,000 people have been given the first dose of the vaccine in six cities in Brazil, which is grappling with one of the world’s worst outbreaks of the disease.

A source familiar with the matter told Reuters that the volunteer who had died was likely to have been part of a control group that did not receive the COVID-19 vaccine, suggesting that the volunteer was instead given a meningitis jab.

Oxford University confirmed that testing would continue, adding that after careful assessment: ‘There have been no concerns about the safety of the clinical trial.’

But AstraZeneca declined to comment immediately.

This follows a pause in the trials of the vaccine last month when a patient in the UK fell ill. The trial resumed days later but is still on hold in the U.S.

Also on Wednesday, Brazil’s President said their federal government would not buy the vaccine from China’s Sinovac, contradicting what his health minister said the day before, that it would be included in the nation’s immunization program.

Brazil has the second deadliest outbreak of the coronavirus, after the United States, with more than 154-thousand people killed.

Video Transcript

A volunteer in the trial of the COVID-19 vaccine being developed by AstraZeneca and Oxford University has died in Brazil. Brazil’s health authority said on Wednesday that although the volunteer had died, the trial would continue.

So far, 8,000 people have been given the first dose of the vaccine in six cities in Brazil, which is grappling with one of the world’s worst outbreaks of the disease.

A source familiar with the matter told Reuters that the volunteer who died was likely to have been part of a control group that did not receive the COVID-19 vaccine, suggesting that the volunteer was instead given a meningitis jab.

Oxford University confirmed that testing would continue, adding that after careful assessment, quote, “there have been no concerns about the safety of the clinical trial.” But AstraZeneca declined to comment immediately. This follows a pause in trials of the vaccine last month when a patient in the UK fell ill. The trial resumed days later, but it’s still on hold in the US.

[NON-ENGLISH SPEECH]

Also on Wednesday Brazil’s president said the federal government would not buy the vaccine from China’s Sinovac, contradicting what his health minister said the day before, that it would be included in the nation’s immunization program.

Brazil has the second-deadliest outbreak of the coronavirus after the United States, with more than 154,000 people killed.

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Coronavirus vaccine: Oxford AstraZeneca trial volunteer dies in Brazil

The Brazilian newspaper O Globo, citing unnamed sources, reported that the volunteer was in a control group that did not receive the experimental vaccine and died of covid-19. The news service G1 said the volunteer was a 28-year-old physician who treated coronavirus patients in Rio de Janeiro.

The National Health Surveillance Agency said it was informed of the volunteer’s death Monday. The agency said AstraZeneca’s international safety committee had recommended the trial continue.

Under the trial’s protocol, half the participants receive the experimental vaccine, and half receive an established meningitis vaccine that has been proved safe. The trial, like others, is overseen by an independent board that reviews all adverse events. Any severe event that might have been caused by the vaccine would trigger a pause in the study for an investigation. The trial is not paused due to the death.

A spokesman for AstraZeneca said he could not comment on individual cases in an ongoing trial, citing confidentiality requirements and clinical trial rules. But he said there were no concerns that would lead the study to pause.

“We can confirm that all required review processes have been followed,” spokesman Brendan McEvoy said. “All significant medical events are carefully assessed by trial investigators, an independent safety monitoring committee and the regulatory authorities. These assessments have not led to any concerns about continuation of the ongoing study.”

Oxford confirmed that the volunteer’s death was reviewed by an independent committee.

“Following careful assessment of this case in Brazil, there have been no concerns about safety of the clinical trial, and the independent review in addition to the Brazilian regulator have recommended that the trial should continue,” the university said in a statement.

The trial was suspended last month after a participant developed an unexplained illness. AstraZeneca has since resumed trials in Brazil, India, South Africa, Japan and Britain. It remains on hold in the United States.

In the global race for a vaccine, Brazil, which has been battered by the disease but has a long-standing openness to vaccines, has become one of the most crucial testing grounds. The country is hosting four vaccine trials — as many as anywhere in the world.

Brazil has watched vaccine development closely as the virus continues to lash the country. The official toll is now more than 5 million infections and over 150,000 deaths, second only to the United States. But as the tests near their conclusions, the issue of vaccinating people has become just one more issue for politicians to argue over.

São Paulo Gov. João Doria has said state health workers will begin receiving a Chinese vaccine before the end of the year. Other groups will then follow. Doria has said the vaccine will be obligatory in Brazil’s most populous state.

President Jair Bolsonaro, who has spent months touting the unvetted and potentially harmful anti-malarial drug hydroxychloroquine as a coronavirus cure, has been deeply suspicious of vaccines. He says the vaccine will not be mandatory, even though a law he signed

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