Kendra Hatcher’s Death: How the Dentist Died

Ricky Paniagua Kendra Hatcher


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Brenda Delgado (left) and Ricky Paniagua with Kendra Hatcher (right)

Kendra Hatcher was a pediatric dentist who was killed in a murder-for-hire plot devised by her boyfriend’s ex-girlfriend, Brenda Delgado, in Dallas in 2015.

Delgado, 31, recruited two acquaintances, Kristopher Love and Crystal Cortes, to carry out the killing after her ex-boyfriend, Dr. Ricardo “Ricky” Paniagua, told her in an email he was in a new relationship, and it was going well. Hatcher was 35.

Dateline NBC is diving into the case on a new episode, which airs Friday, November 13, 2020 at 9 p.m. Eastern time.

Here’s what you need to know:


Delgado Hired a Small-Time Marijuana Dealer & a Single Mom to Help Her Carry Out Her Murder Plot

Love, who was convicted of pulling the trigger on Hatcher, and Cortes, who was recruited as the getaway driver, were people Delgado “barely knew” when she asked them to help her kill Hatcher, according to a profile by Texas Monthly. Love was a small-time marijuana dealer and Cortes was “a down-on-her-luck single mother.”

Cortes was offered $500 to serve as the getaway driver. When asked why she was willing to take $500 to be involved in a murder, she gave the Texas Monthly reporter “a blank look.”

“I was broke,” she said. “And I had a son to support.”

Love, on the other hand, wanted start-up money for a prostitution ring, Texas Monthly reported. Delgado concocted a story that she had connections to a drug cartel, and she said he would pay him $3,000 in a combination of drugs and cash.

The night of Hatcher’s murder, Paniagua texted Delgado to tell her his devastating news. She texted him back the next morning, offering to bring him groceries or help with anything he needed.

A juror who served on the case puzzled over the murder in a piece written for the Dallas Observer.

“I still don’t understand what makes people do such stupid, cruel things,” wrote Casey Miller. “How does a 23-year-old Dallas woman get talked into planning and completing a murder with someone she has known for one month? When does a dental hygienist student in her 30s become so self-absorbed that she must have the new girlfriend of her ex “eliminated” so they can be reunited and live happily ever after? Why does a train-wreck stoner with three kids of his own think cash, a bag of weed and some cocaine is an even trade for shooting a stranger in the back of the head, execution style?”


Hatcher Was Shot in the Back of the Head & Her Purse Was Stolen to Make

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Travis Roy, a hockey player, son, and friend, has died

But last month, shortly before the surgery, when we met for what would be the last time, at his Vermont home overlooking Lake Champlain, he didn’t want to talk about that.

He didn’t want people to worry about him. Not the paralyzed people and their families whom he had counseled and helped. Not the young hockey players, boys and girls, who had met and been inspired by him.

After so many years in a wheelchair, getting through and healing from such surgery posed many serious risks to his health. He wanted to engage in this fight with only his family and closest friends knowing of the threat it posed to his life.

He never had the luxury of dealing with his hockey injury privately. His was the most public of catastrophes, witnessed by thousands of fans at the Walter Brown Arena at Boston University. His was a story that would eventually be known by millions.

Travis Roy watched a BU hockey game in 2005.
Travis Roy watched a BU hockey game in 2005.Hunt, Justine Globe Staff

What happened when he was just 20 years old, only 11 seconds into his first shift as a Boston University Terrier, fulfilling a dream that he pursued with singular determination since he first laced up skates as a boy in North Yarmouth, Maine, was a sobering reminder of how fragile life is, of how vulnerable even elite athletes are.

The random cruelty that befell him touched so many. So many people, especially in New England, felt it vicariously.

What was truly extraordinary and inspirational was how Travis responded to his catastrophic injury. Within a year, he returned to BU.

Rather than concentrate fully on his own rehabilitation, which on its own was overwhelming, he began thinking of ways to help others in similar circumstances. In a culture that is notably self-absorbed, his reaction was to use his own tragic situation to create opportunities for those in similar circumstances with less support and resources.

Boston University players celebrate around former player Travis Roy, center top, and the Hockey East Trophy after defeating New Hampshire 4-2 in the 1997 Hockey East Finals.
Boston University players celebrate around former player Travis Roy, center top, and the Hockey East Trophy after defeating New Hampshire 4-2 in the 1997 Hockey East Finals.WINSLOW TOWNSON

He was just 21 years old, still trying to figure out how to negotiate a wheelchair around the BU campus, when he started a foundation to help fund research and buy adaptive equipment for others who are paralyzed.

Travis raised millions for the foundation, but just as important he raised spirits, of people living with paralysis and their families, and awareness, so that others who knew nothing about paralysis might be moved to act.

Anyone who heard him speak will know what I mean when I say he was awe-inspiring in the most understated way. Just by telling his story, Travis provided one of life’s greatest gifts: perspective.

In his moments of despair, and given the hand that life dealt him they were remarkably rare, Travis worried about being a burden.

During our last conversation, he talked of especially not wanting to be a burden to his parents, Lee and

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They met in Hawaii and built a life in rural Maryland. This fall, they died two days apart.

When the chief barber retired, Doris took over the first chair. She knew everyone, said her grandson, Jeffrey Grim.

“When she was in the hospital, her respiratory therapist said, ‘Did you cut hair?’ and she was like, ‘Yeah,’ ” Grim recalled in an interview, describing Doris’s hospitalization for covid-19 this summer. The respiratory therapist then said, “ ‘My dad used to take me to you when I was a little boy.’ ”

Doris Bender died of complications of coronavirus on Sept. 3, in Room 4107 of Meritus Medical Center Intensive Care Unit in Robinwood. Jacob had died Sept. 1 in the same hospital, also of covid-19, in Room 4109.

Jacob, who was 83, died at 2:36 p.m.. Doris, who was 81, died at 2:34 p.m.

“Two days apart, two minutes apart, two rooms apart,” said Grim, a PhD candidate at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. “It’s really hard to lose both of them at the same time. My family will never be the same. And they were old, but I think we would have had a lot more years with them, if it wasn’t for covid.”

Grim said he isn’t certain how his grandparents contracted the virus. He remembers that the couple came into contact with someone who had the virus, but tested negative shortly thereafter. In August, Doris began experiencing heart attack-like symptoms.

“When they took her to the hospital, as protocol they did a covid test and found out that it was indeed the covid that was attacking her lungs and heart,” Grim said.

Jacob, who Grim called Pap-Pap, tested positive two days later, on Aug. 14. He was home for two weeks after Doris was hospitalized, but then his condition grew worse.

“All of a sudden, he just went downhill quickly” Grim said. “And we really think that because Grandma was such a caretaker, she wanted to make sure he passed before she was ready to go.”

Grim said that after Doris died, the family found a notebook where she kept count of how many newborn hats she had made for the hospital: 3,241 in all.

Before the pandemic, Doris enjoyed going out to play Bingo with her daughter Theresa on Wednesday nights and playing a Japanese card game called Hanafuda on Sundays, Grim said. She hated staying home during the pandemic, and even called it “jail.”

The couple tended to their garden, where they planted vegetables such as tomatoes, peppers, and squash. Grim said when Doris was in the hospital, the doctors told the family she was delirious and was talking about her cantaloupes being ready. But when Grim visited the garden afterward, he found “two perfectly bright cantaloupes.”

Doris would have turned 82 last week. The family didn’t come together to observe her birthday out of safety concerns. But Grim and his brother, Josh, bought anthuriums, a tropical flower their grandmother loved, to put on her grave.

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Drop in flu deaths may indicate that most at risk died from coronavirus

Flu deaths are down two-thirds from the five-year average, a drop that could indicate the most vulnerable Americans died in the first wave of COVID-19.

New federal estimates show no flu deaths for the week ending Oct. 17. The federal five-year average for the same week is 17 fatalities. New York and New York City recorded no flu deaths, which is also that week’s five-year average for each.

“We are still very early into this influenza season and it’s too early to make any predictions on severity,” Health Department spokesman Michael Lanza told The Post. (iStock)

“We are still very early into this influenza season and it’s too early to make any predictions on severity,” Health Department spokesman Michael Lanza told The Post. (iStock)

The city is taking a wait-and-see attitude, with the flu season just a few weeks old.

“We are still very early into this influenza season and it’s too early to make any predictions on severity,” Health Department spokesman Michael Lanza told The Post.

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A similar pattern is emerging in the UK, where flu and pneumonia took 1,132 lives last month – 28% lower than the five-year monthly average of roughly 1,500.

The country’s Office for National Statistics thinks the drop is because medically vulnerable Brits who would have died this fall from flu and pneumonia instead died this spring from the coronavirus.

But private British statistician Kevin McConway told The Post he doubts “whether it’s the whole story.”

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McConway points out that flu and pneumonia are airborne infections like the coronavirus and the safety guidelines put in place for the pandemic — masks, social distancing and handwashing — would stop them, too.

Said state health department spokesman Jeffrey Hammond: “Wearing masks, social distancing, hand washing, and all the other measures put in place to slow the Coronavirus should also slow the flu and other viruses.”

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US health officials have been urging Americans for months that a bad flu season on top of the COVID outbreak could overwhelm hospitals and increase the risk of catching both infections at the same time.

Pneumonia deaths in the U.S. and across the city and state are down as well. For the week ending Oct. 17, deaths nationwide stood at 1,251 – down 60% from the five-year average of 3,106 for the same week.

The state recorded 93 pneumonia deaths, a 36% decrease from the five-year average of 146 for the same week. The city’s total stood at 51, down the five-year average of 86 — a 41% reduction.

Click for more from NYPost.com.

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Virus shutdowns took a grim toll on amputee veterans who died by suicide, families say

His life became a blur of surgeries and recovery, and in moments of darkness, he had contemplated ending it all, he later said.

But Hamill renewed his spirits as a motivational speaker and advocate for other veterans, many of whom became part of a legion of social media followers drawn to his gritty determination.

His post on April 19 had a different tone.

“My own personal hell has been reignited,” Hamill wrote on Instagram. “This pandemic, although viral in nature; alludes to what happens to us as human beings, when we are stripped of our outlets, and are deprived of our ability to socialize.”

Hamill died two weeks later of an apparent suicide at the age of 31.

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Part 1 of 3. “These are the times, that try men’s souls.” • For the past month or so, I’ve sat back and watched human beings make sense of the world’s current predicament; and how it correlates to, and affects, their daily lives. I have watched many attempt to make sense of all of this. Inspire their peers across a variety of platforms, justify everything they perceive as they see fit. I’ve watched multi-million dollar earning business owners blast their inspirational speeches, and give their tools for motivation. I’ve watched actual entrepreneurs, to include some of my closest and dearest friends, suffer, as they watch their dreams get suffocated by the current state of affairs and all of its ironies. I’ve observed and listened to all the ‘loudest (men/women) in the room’, tout their recipe for success, only to succumb to the gravity of our current hardships with a parting whisper. There is a harsh reality that most of us have finally realized, that transcends our current socioeconomic environment. One that many, though still afflicted, shrug off because of stubbornness. That they ignore. That they pretend doesn’t exist outside their small bubble, in their day to day lives. Yes, we’ve all been stymied during what should be a period of growth; springtime, a source of new beginnings and hope. Coming out of the ever inevitable depression and seclusion of winter, this following season seems to be some cruel universal joke played upon us as a species. Compounding these present set of circumstances, there are those of us who live in the grips of mental illness or injury. Living in a veritable prison of sadness, fear, devastation, and utter agony. Day in, and day out. I began writing this at 03:46 in the morning, on April 19th, 2020. I’ve been drunk on red wine since the previous night. I haven’t slept. I haven’t stopped suffering. My own personal hell has been reignited, in light of present circumstances affecting us all. This pandemic, although viral in nature; alludes to what happens to us as human beings, when we are stripped of our outlets, and are deprived of our ability to socialize.

A post shared by Rory Hamill (@rory.hamill) on

As coronavirus restrictions unfurled

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A volunteer in AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine trial has died in Brazil, report says

A volunteer who was part of AstraZeneca’s and Oxford University’s COVID-19 vaccine trial died in Brazil, according to Reuters

Reuters reported on Wednesday that Brazilian health regulator Anvisa announced a participant in the late-stage clinical trial had died but that the trial would continue. The regulator provided no further details. 


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The news outlet reported Oxford University confirmed the trial will move forward in Brazil, saying there have been “no concerns about safety of the clinical trial.” 

Reuters cited a Brazilian news outlet that reported the volunteer had been part of the placebo group and did not receive the vaccine candidate. It’s unclear at this time how the participant died. It’s the first known fatality among COVID-19 vaccine trial volunteers. 

Following the news, AstraZeneca shares were down 1.7 percent, Reuters reports. 

AstraZeneca’s vaccine candidate is one of four in the U.S. that have reached the final stage of testing in the U.S. 

The company paused all trials of the vaccine around the world in early September after two participants in late-stage trials in the U.K. developed unexplained neurological illnesses. Oxford University said the illnesses were unlikely to be associated with the vaccine. 

AstraZeneca has since restarted trials in the U.K., Brazil and South Africa but they remain on hold in the U.S. 

Pharmaceutical giant Johnson & Johnson last week temporarily paused its late-stage clinical trials for a vaccine. The company halted the phase three trial due to an “unexplained” illness in one of its volunteers. It’s unclear what the illness was and whether the participant received the experimental vaccine or was given the placebo. 

Health officials have estimated a safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine could be made available to high risk groups before the year is out. A vaccine isn’t likely to be broadly available to all Americans until several months into 2021. 


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Texas woman died of COVID-19 while on board a plane from Arizona to Texas, officials say

A Texas woman died of COVID-19 while on board a plane from Arizona to Texas, officials said Sunday.

The woman, in her 30s, had difficulty breathing before the plane took off on July 25, according to Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.

“They tried to give her oxygen,” Jenkins said during a briefing. “It was not successful. She died on the jetway.”

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County officials knew a Garland resident had died in July, Jenkins told WFAA, but only recently received an autopsy report from an Arizona medical examiner that listed the virus as the cause of death.


“We don’t know a whole lot,” Jenkins said. “We may not know if she was aware she was sick.”

The woman, who has not been identified, had underlying high risk health conditions, according to a news release.

Jenkins said he did not have information on which airline the woman was traveling with, WFAA reported.

On Monday, Dallas officials announced 382 new coronavirus cases, bringing the total to 90,318 confirmed cases and 1,085 deaths.

Across the state, 2,273 cases and eight new deaths were reported, for a total of 828,527 cases and 17,022 deaths. As of Monday, 4,319 Texans were hospitalized for the coronavirus.

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More Than 2,800 People Have Died From Coronavirus In Alabama

MONTGOMERY, AL — After several weeks of decreasing numbers on new COVID-19 cases, Alabama has seen a gradual increase in the number of new cases per day in recent weeks. As well, the state surpassed 2,800 total deaths since the pandemic began, placing Alabama 20th in the U.S. in deaths per number of cases.

Alabama is still averaging more than 1,000 new cases of COVID-19 each day. By the end of September, the state was averaging fewer than 900 new cases per day.

In the last seven days, the average number of COVID-19 hospitalizations has been higher (838) than it was when the month began (751).

Of the 153,016 confirmed cases of COVID-19, the Alabama Department of Public Health estimates that 74,238 people are presumed to have recovered from the virus.

health officials point to several factors that could contribute to a spike in new cases in Alabama. Some say a relaxed attitude toward wearing masks and social distancing is one factor, as well as students returning to school and parents attending athletic events.

New cases of COVID-19 statewide in the last week:

  • October 13: 886 new cases

  • October 14: 1,235 new cases

  • October 15: 1,238 new cases

  • October 16: 1,331 new cases

  • October 17: 985 new cases

  • October 18: 874 new cases

  • October 19: 1,085 new cases

SEE ALSO:

Sanitizing Stations Gifted To UAB To Help Prevent Coronavirus Spread

Hoover Schools To Bring Students On Campus Full Time Monday

This article originally appeared on the Birmingham Patch

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All 62 residents at Kansas nursing home have COVID, 10 have died

Topeka, Kansas — A coronavirus outbreak has killed 10 residents in a Kansas nursing home, and the local health department said every one of the residents had tested positive for COVID-19 as of Monday, along with an unspecified number of staff. The affected home is in northwest Kansas’ Norton County, which has seen one of the largest proportional increases in confirmed coronavirus cases over two weeks in the country.
 
The Norton County health department confirmed Monday night that all 62 residents and some employees at the Andbe Home in Norton had tested positive for the novel coronavirus. The agency also said one Andbe Home resident was hospitalized, while the remaining 51 were being treated at the home. 

PRESS RELEASE

Posted by Norton County Health Department and Home Health on Monday, October 19, 2020

It was not clear how many were experiencing symptoms of the disease, which is known to hit the elderly hardest.
 
The local health department said residents were being quarantined in their rooms and the home was not allowing outside visitors.
 
The outbreak at the nursing home came after the state Department of Health and Environment last week reported more than 100 cases at the state’s prison in Norton over the two weeks ending Wednesday.

andbe-home-norton-kansas-covid.jpg
A screenshot from Google’s Street View shows the Andbe Home nursing and care home in Norton County, Kansas. 

Google


Kansas is seeing an average of more than 700 new confirmed and probable coronavirus cases a day, its largest numbers since early March.

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