Former Long Island firefighter Sarah Apgar develops firehose fitness tool Fitfighter, wins big on ‘Shark Tank’

PORT WASHINGTON, Long Island (WABC) — A former volunteer firefighter from Long Island just won big on ABC’s “Shark Tank” for her new fitness device, which was inspired by her time as a firefighter.

Sarah Apgar, of Port Washington, is the creator of Fitfighter and the Steel Hose.

When Apgar joined the Halesite Volunteer Fire Department in 2012, she noticed the firehouse didn’t have a structured strength training program. Apgar served as a platoon commander in Iraq with the U.S. Army, so she was familiar with regimented strength and weight training programs.

She began using firehoses around the firehouse to train her colleagues.

Throughout the next few years, Apgar began developing a fitness device based upon the firehose. She used real firehose material and filled it with recycled steel shot. She called it the Steel Hose.

The longer the hose, the heavier it is. They range in weight from 5 pounds to 50 pounds.

Local gym owners and trainers started to hear about the product.

“It started to sort of snowball and we sort of thought, wow, I think we’ve got a really special valuable tool here that has applications far reaching beyond where we started for firefighters,” she said.

In 2019, Apgar, a mother of two young girls, sold $45,000 worth of the product.

When COVID struck last spring, Apgar developed an online training platform for the Steel Hose.

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In April and May, she did $40,000 in sales.

Around that time, Apgar received a phone call from producers of “Shark Tank.” They were intrigued with the product and with Apgar’s story. They invited her to appear on the show.

“It’s the dream come true, pinch-yourself-story that people describe,” she said.

The episode was filmed in August and aired November 13.

During the episode, guest Shark Daniel Lubetzky, the creator of KIND bars, bit on Apgar’s offer of $250,000 for a 15 percent stake in Fitfighter.

He offered $250,000 for a 25 percent stake.

Apgar accepted.

Since then, sales have skyrocketed for the Steel Hose and thousands of people purchased memberships to FitFighter’s online training platform. Apgar has 10 trainers. She also leads virtual classes out of her warehouse in Port Washington.

Apgar said she is on a mission to change the way people think about strength training and make them aware of the benefits it can have on people’s physical and mental health.

“I just want people to start moving and moving with weight and learning the principals of strength training,” she said.

Apgar still markets the Steel Hose to fire departments.

She said the FDNY Fire Academy has been using them for the past five years.

“I’m really proud of that. It’s very really special me,” she said.

Apgar said the majority of the production of the Steel Hose will be moving to South Carolina, but some will stay in Port Washington.

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Colorado resident, 20, with ‘mild’ coronavirus case later develops rare condition: officials

A 20-year-old Colorado resident who battled the novel coronavirus later developed a rare but serious condition known as multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C), according to local health officials in the state. 

The resident, of Boulder County, suffered only mild symptoms of COVID-19 and “appeared to have fully recovered,” said county officials in a news release. But three weeks later, the resident fell ill once more — this time with “severe abdominal pain, watery diarrhea, and fever,” all of which are signs of MIS-C. 

Earlier this month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) identified the condition among adults, drawing on reports of 27 adult patients to describe a new, similar condition known as multisystem inflammatory syndrome in adults (MIS-A). (iStock)

Earlier this month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) identified the condition among adults, drawing on reports of 27 adult patients to describe a new, similar condition known as multisystem inflammatory syndrome in adults (MIS-A). (iStock)

Since the pandemic began, there have been various reports of multisystem inflammatory syndrome, but most cases have occurred in children, which is known as MIS-C.

The syndrome is an inflammatory condition that is similar to Kawasaki disease, which causes swelling in arteries throughout the body. Many children with MIS-C — which causes inflammation in the heart, lungs, kidneys, brain, skin, eyes, or gastrointestinal organs —  have either been infected with the novel coronavirus or had been exposed to someone with a COVID-19 infection, health officials have sad. MIS-C can also cause persistent fever, rashes, vomiting and diarrhea, among other symptoms such as a red tongue and eyes.

LOUISIANA CHILD’S POSSIBLE CORONAVIRUS-LINKED MIS-C DEATH THE FIRST IN STATE

However, earlier this month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) identified the condition among adults, drawing on reports of 27 adult patients to describe a new, similar condition known as multisystem inflammatory syndrome in adults (MIS-A).

“Findings indicate that adult patients of all ages with current or previous SARS-CoV-2 infection can develop a hyperinflammatory syndrome resembling MIS-C,” the authors wrote at the time, adding that measures to limit COVID-19 spread may help prevent MIS-A.

SERIOUS CORONAVIRUS-RELATED INFLAMMATORY CONDITION AMONG CHILDREN NOW REPORTED IN ADULTS: CDC

The Colorado patient required hospitalization and intensive care before they improved and were eventually discharged from the hospital. However, “while most young adults experience mild symptoms from COVID-19,” officials warned, “this case is an example of how the disease can progress and how little is known about the long-term impacts of the illness.”

RARE CORONAVIRUS-LINKED SYNDROME AFFECTS 11 CHILDREN IN WASHINGTON STATE: OFFICIALS

“I hope sharing the information about this patient’s experience will help others to better understand how serious COVID-19 can be, even for young people,” said Dr. Heather Pujet, an infectious disease doctor at Boulder Community Health, in a statement. “The patient became extremely ill very quickly with multi-organ system involvement; they fortunately recovered after a period of severe illness. However, this should serve as a warning for the younger people in the community to please not disregard their own personal risks with COVID-19.”

“Much remains unknown about how this condition develops, but it’s related to the body’s attempts to fight an invader,” added Dr. Sam Dominguez, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at Children’s

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