Study: Postpartum depression can linger for years for some women

Many women have depression symptoms after giving birth, but for some postpartum depression hangs on for years, a U.S. government study finds.

Of nearly 4,900 new mothers researchers followed, one-quarter had depression symptoms at some point in their child’s first three years. And for about half of them, the symptoms either started early on and never improved, or took time to emerge.

It all suggests women should be screened for postpartum depression over a longer period, said lead researcher Diane Putnick.

“Based on our data, I’d say screening could continue for two years,” said Putnick, a staff scientist at the U.S. National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, in Bethesda, Md.

Right now, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends pediatricians take on the task of postpartum depression screening. It says they should screen mothers for symptoms at their baby’s routine check-ups during the first six months of life.

That’s both because postpartum depression usually arises in that period, and because babies have frequent check-ups during those months, according to Putnick. So pediatricians are, in a sense, best positioned to catch moms’ depression symptoms, she said.

On the other hand, pediatricians are also limited in what they can do. Mothers are not their patients, so they do not have access to medical records to get the bigger picture — including whether a woman has a history of clinical depression. And they can only suggest that mothers follow-up with their own provider.

“What happens after women are screened?” said Dr. Rahul Gupta, chief medical and health officer for the nonprofit March of Dimes.

“The recommendation is excellent,” he said, referring to the AAP advice to pediatricians. “It’s a great starting point.”

But women’s primary care doctors need to be involved, Gupta said, particularly since postpartum depression can persist, or surface relatively later after childbirth.

For the new study, published online this week in Pediatrics, Putnick’s team used data on 4,866 women in New York state. All took part in a research project on infertility treatment and its impact on child development.

During the study, mothers completed a five-question survey on depression symptoms when their baby was 4 months old, and then again when their child was 1, 2 and 3 years of age.

The study was done before the AAP recommendations came out, Putnick said, and it’s not clear what kind of screening or follow-up women might have gotten from their own providers.

Based on the study screening, new mothers followed four different trajectories: Three-quarters had few depressive symptoms throughout the three-year period; almost 13% had symptoms when their baby was 4 months old, but improved afterward; 8% initially had few symptoms, but developed more as their child grew older; and 4.5% had persistent depression symptoms.

Putnick stressed that the women only screened positive for symptoms. They were not diagnosed with clinical depression, and it’s unclear how many would need treatment, such as talk therapy or medication.

But the findings show that postpartum depression symptoms can be long-lasting, or arise relatively

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Help for people who suffer seasonal and pandemic depression

“I went through a depressive swing. It was unbearable,” she says. Eventually, Hornickel told her roommate she wanted to die.

Since then, Hornickel has been in a partial hospitalization program to treat suicidal ideation, depression and bipolar disorder, and she recognizes that her initial reaction to quarantine was a manic episode. Although she’s doing a lot better, there’s a nagging worry: wintertime.

“For me, personally, the nighttime is really hard,” Hornickel says. “And when there’s not sunlight and sunshine and things to do — at that time in the winter — it definitely compounds those feelings.”

Hornickel is describing seasonal depression, known as seasonal affective disorder, or SAD. It’s a type of depression that occurs when it gets colder, there’s less light and it’s more difficult to get outside. Mental health experts worry that, because the pandemic has already triggered depressive symptoms in many Americans, more people will experience seasonal depressive symptoms this winter. 

A survey study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in September found that U.S. adults were reporting levels of depressive symptoms more than three times higher during the pandemic than before it. A survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in June yielded similar results, with more U.S. adults reporting adverse mental health symptoms, particularly in young adults, racial and ethnic minorities and essential workers. (On the flip side, a survey done of U.S. teens from May to July found that teens actually fared well when it came to depression and loneliness.)

The American Psychological Association has seen a sharp increase in suicidal ideation, particularly among young adults, during the pandemic, according to Vaile Wright, senior director of health-care innovation. “I think that’s, in large part, due to the level of uncertainty around covid,” she says. While most disasters have a beginning, middle and end, she adds, the pandemic has continued — with no end in sight. 

Summer offered a bit of a respite. As evidence mounted that socializing outdoors is safer, “I think people really relied on their ability to take advantage of the nice weather,” Wright says. But the coming winter months will probably complicate how people are experiencing depression, whether they also suffer from SAD or not, experts say.

Although only a small percentage of people typically report seasonal depression (most estimates put it at 6 percent of the U.S. population for severe symptoms and 14 percent for mild symptoms), Wright says she wouldn’t be surprised if there’s another increase in depressive symptoms among the population in general as the cold weather compounds social isolation.

Lisa Carlson, president of the American Public Health Association, agrees. According to Carlson, seasonal depression is more common in people who have a history of depression. “It may be the people who are at risk of seasonal affective disorder may be the same people for whom covid has already triggered depression,” she says. “So, we may have a lot of overlap in those people.” Carlson also says seasonal depression and clinical depression

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Trump addresses addiction, depression due to COVID-19 lockdowns

President Trump on Friday warned of depression and addiction, which health professionals says is on the rise amid coronavirus lockdowns, during the final 2020 presidential debate. 

Trump and 2020 Democratic nominee Joe Biden took opposing stances toward the country’s future in the middle of a pandemic, with Biden telling the audience that the U.S. is “about to go into a dark winter” and the president disagreeing with that statement.

“I don’t think we’re going to have a dark winter at all,” the president, who has been criticized for initially downplaying the severity of COVID-19 in the early months of the pandemic, said.

Democratic candidate former Vice President Joe Biden speaks to reporters before boarding his campaign plane at Nashville International Airport Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Democratic candidate former Vice President Joe Biden speaks to reporters before boarding his campaign plane at Nashville International Airport Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

He went on to say that furthering lockdowns, however, could steer Americans down a darker emotional path.

“We can’t keep this country closed,” Trump said. “This is a massive country with a massive economy. There’s depression, alcohol, drugs at a level nobody’s ever seen before. The cure cannot be worse than the problem itself.”

PERCENTAGE OF AMERICANS REPORTING DEPRESSION SYMPTOMS TRIPLES DURING CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC, STUDY SHOWS

Biden responded by saying he was “going to shut down the virus, not the country,” adding that Trump’s “ineptitude” is what caused the country to shut down.

“Why businesses have gone under, why schools have closed, why people have lost their living, and they are concerned,” Biden said. “He should have been — instead of in a sand trap at his golf course — he should have been negotiating with Nancy Pelosi and the rest of the Democrats and Republicans…”

ESTIMATES SUGGEST DRUG OVERDOSES ON THE RISE SINCE CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK

The number of Americans reporting symptoms of anxiety and depression since the outset of the virus reached an all-time high in September, particularly among young people, according to an October report from mental health nonprofit Mental Health America.

Firefighters and paramedics with Anne Arundel County Fire Department wear enhanced PPE, during the coronavirus pandemic, as they treat a patient in cardiac arrest as a result of a drug overdose on May 6, 2020. (Photo by ALEX EDELMAN/AFP via Getty Images)

Firefighters and paramedics with Anne Arundel County Fire Department wear enhanced PPE, during the coronavirus pandemic, as they treat a patient in cardiac arrest as a result of a drug overdose on May 6, 2020. (Photo by ALEX EDELMAN/AFP via Getty Images)

The report found that 9.7% of U.S. youth are experiencing severe depression compared to 9.2% from the same time last year. Among U.S. adults, more than 8 in 10 people who took anxiety screenings in September had moderate to severe symptoms. The same rate was consistently true for those who took depression screenings between March and September.

CORONAVIRUS CREATES ‘PERFECT STORM’ FOR ADDICTION IN UNITED STATES

Alcohol and drug abuse has gone through the roof. At least 40 states have reported increases in opioid-related fatalities since COVID-19 lockdowns began, and several have reported increases in alcohol-related deaths, as well, according to an October issue brief from the American Medical Association (AMA), citing a number of national reports.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also reported a 10% increase in overdose deaths during the first few

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Hestia Insight Inc. Begins Healthcare Operations; Treating Anxiety, Depression; Exploring Alternate Medicine

Las Vegas, NV – ( NewMediaWire ) – October 22, 2020 – Hestia Insight Inc. (OTC: HSTA) new subsidiary, HSTA Health Inc. (HHI), today announced that it has entered a business partnership with Noether Sciences and Technologies, Inc.   HHI will utilize Noether’s IP therapy to treat anxiety and depression and has licensing rights for the therapy throughout the U.S.

“These two most common diseases cause numerous societal problems.  We believe this innovative technology will provide excellent healthcare services and we look forward to marketing it to medical professionals,” said Edward C. Lee, Chairman and President of Hestia and President of HHI.

“We are coming out of a difficult period, with the COVID-19 pandemic, and we believe there are many innovative technologies that should be introduced in the healthcare industry and commercialized,” Mr. Lee said.  “For instance, the alternative medicine market size, a multi-billion-dollar sector, continues to grow.  This includes yoga, meditation, magnetic intervention, acupuncture, and other wellness treatments.  HHI will work to lead and expand this sector.  We are exploring the establishments of clinics throughout the U.S. to provide better patient healthcare.”

Mr. Lee also stressed that:  “Healthcare companies with great products and technology have not been able to enter the marketplace in an effective way, often being unaware on how to communicate with healthcare industry professionals.  We look forward to assisting in this effort, a huge opportunity in a new dimension to make a better life for everyone.”

“After COVID-19 we believe consumers are ready to adapt to a new healthcare ecosystem. It will bring more hope to consumers,” concluded Mr. Lee. “The global healthcare market reached a value of nearly $8,452 billion in 2018, having grown at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 7.3% since 2014, and is expected to grow at a CAGR of 8.9% to nearly $11,909 billion by 2022.”

ABOUT HESTIA INSIGHT INC.:  (www.hestiainsight.com) Hestia Insight Inc. is an advisory Company focused primarily on the great Healthcare and Biotech sectors. It also provides seed capital and mezzanine financing to its clients. Hestia Insight will make strategic acquisitions and mergers or joint ventures with emerging growth companies with intellectual properties. It provides sales and marketing guidance and capital market advice to increase the success of its clients.

(“Safe Harbor” Statement under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995: This press release contains or may contain forward-looking statements such as statements regarding the Company’s growth and profitability, growth strategy, liquidity and access to public markets, operating expense reduction, and trends in the industry in which the Company operates. The forward-looking statements contained in this press release are also subject to other risks and uncertainties, including those more fully described in the Company’s filings. The Company assumes no obligation to update these forward-looking statements to reflect actual results, changes in risks, uncertainties or assumptions underlying or affecting such statements, or for prospective events that may have a retroactive effect.)

Contact: Paul Knopick

[email protected]

940.262.3584

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More than 7 in 10 Gen-Zers report symptoms of depression during pandemic, survey finds

From increased stress and anxiety to rising levels of loneliness, the mental health consequences of the Covid-19 pandemic are wide-sweeping. A new survey from the American Psychological Association points to the age group that’s been hit hardest: Gen-Z.



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Gen-Z adults, those ages 18 to 23, reported the highest levels of stress compared to other generations and were the most likely age group to report symptoms of depression, according to the APA’s 2020 Stress in America survey.

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More than seven in 10 Gen-Z adults surveyed said they experienced common symptoms of depression in the prior two weeks, such as: feeling so tired they sat around and did nothing, having trouble thinking and concentrating and feeling very restless, lonely, miserable or unhappy.

So why is Gen-Z hit so hard with stress and depression during the pandemic? They are “experiencing adulthood at a time when the future looks uncertain,” while older generations might have more perspective that enables them to cope with the changes, according to the report.

Fear and anxiety tend to run hand-in-hand, Kevin Antshel, clinical psychologist and director of the clinical psychology program at Syracuse University previously told CNBC Make It. “The more things are uncertain, the more we’re going to fear, and the more we fear things, the more we are anxious,” he said. And prolonged anxiety can lead to depression.

The APA survey took place from Aug. 4 to Aug. 26. When asked to rank their stress level on a scale of one to 10 the prior month, Gen-Z adults said they experienced the highest level of stress, 6.1 out of 10, compared to other generations.

To put that in perspective, millennials (ages 24-41) ranked their stress level 5.6 out of 10, and Gen X (ages 42-55) said their stress was a 5.2 out of 10. The overall reported stress level for adults in 2020 is 5.0.

For Gen-Z teens, ages 13 to 17, 51% said that the pandemic made it impossible to plan for the future, and 67% of Gen-Z adults in college said the same. The Gen-Z adults in college also said that uncertainty about the school year was a significant source of stress.

There are a few strategies that the APA says can help decrease anxiety and build emotional resilience in young people. For starters, giving young people outlets to talk about issues that are troubling them is important. Practicing the rule of “three good things,” in which you reflect on three good things that happened at the end of the day, may be helpful the APA suggests.

It’s also crucial to remember that we are in the midst of a global pandemic, and we all may need more flexibility, space or support than usual, according to the APA.

The APA’s Stress in America survey was conducted with the Harris Poll and consisted of more than 3,000 adults ages 18 and older, plus a sample of 1,026 teens ages 13 to 17.  

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Depression in Pregnancy May Raise Risk of Childhood Asthma

A mother’s psychological distress during pregnancy may increase the risk for asthma in her child, a new study suggests.

Researchers had the parents of 4,231 children fill out well-validated questionnaires on psychological stress in the second trimester of pregnancy, and again three years later. The mothers also completed questionnaires at two and six months after giving birth. The study, in the journal Thorax, found that 362 of the mothers and 167 of the fathers had clinically significant psychological distress during the mothers’ pregnancies.

When the children were 10 years old, parents reported whether their child had ever been diagnosed with asthma. As an extra measure, the researchers tested the children using forced expiratory volume, or FEV, a standard clinical test of lung function.

After controlling for age, smoking during pregnancy, body mass index, a history of asthma and other factors, they found that maternal depression and anxiety during pregnancy was significantly associated with both diagnoses of asthma and poorer lung function in their children. There was no association between childhood asthma and parents’ psychological distress in the years after pregnancy, and no association with paternal psychological stress at any time.

“Of course, this could be only one of many causes of asthma,” said the lead author, Dr. Evelien R. van Meel of Erasmus University in Rotterdam, “but we corrected for many confounders, and we saw the effect only in mothers. This seems to suggest that there’s something going on in the uterus. But this is an observational study, and we can’t say that it’s a causal effect.”

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Mental Health – Depression

The early stage of depression is very important. Most people quietly suffer depression and are never diagnosed, while some treat themselves without them knowing by adjusting to nature and exploring their chances of hope.

We all feel depressed sometimes but get well over time. After all, being sad is a part of living, we can't all have it good all the time.

Depression is an illness that affects both the mental state and mind. It affects the way you feel and think, increasing your thought of hopelessness and sadness.

The majority of people will suffer from depression at least once in their lifetime, this could be from grief, stress or illness which can lead from mild depression to severe depression.

What causes depression:
Research shows that the brain plays an important role regulating our mood, this could have a major impact on depression, but some factors contribute, including change in hormones, where the body cannot manage stress and experience positives mood.

Who can have depression:
Depression can happen to anyone at any age, depression is an illness of mental state. Appropriate therapy for mood swings in children and teenagers will reduce the chances of having depression.

Symptoms of depression:
o Inability to think or concentrate
o Hopelessness
o Inability to make decisions
o Guilt
o Changes in sleep
o Loss of interest
o Loss of energy
o Sadness
o Suicidal thoughts
o Weight gain

Unfortunately Depression is common and a serious illness. Immediate help or treatment is advisable.

The majority of people will suffer from depression at least once in their lifetime.

Cure for depression:
As depression is an illness of the mental health, there are many ways symptoms can be cured
o Antidepressant: It's a popular treatment for depression. There are over 30 types of antidepressants tablets, if one does not relieve your symptoms, you can always try another one and chances are you will find one that works well for you.
o Exercise: it's one of the natural ways of reducing the symptoms of depression and there is evidence that it helps in improving your motivation and mood.
o Religion: This is the most common and natural way of totally curing depression. Majority of people choose religions as their choice of depression treatment. Most religion preaches faith that gives hope to believers, even though religion can bring guilt of past troubles, after all memories are the only treasure that cannot be changed but remembering the hope of forgiveness elevates the mood and mental state.

Research shows that 90% of people suffering from depression in Africa are not diagnosed. Are you suffering from depression, or do you know anyone suffering from depression? Talk to someone today, it helps. Talk to us today.

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Companionship and Senior Mental Health – Let’s Talk About Depression

Most of us believe that caregiving must focus on the mind, body and soul. When seniors are lonely, they get depressed, just like you and I. Human beings need companionship, but we also need the right type of companionship. Perhaps like you, I strongly believe in matching a caregiver’s personality with that of their client and I find it so unfortunate that many companies in the in-home care industry do not concentrate on this. Matching client personalities makes for a positive relationship, stronger mental health, and a stress free in-home caregiver situation. Everyone wins.

Yes, it takes a little longer to find the right caregiver, but that’s okay, because in good in-home care companies they’ve found it prevents turnover, which is one of the complaints that many in the industry have. A true companionship-based caregiver scenario is one where the client is treated like family. The best way to achieve this is to make a proper match so that both the caregiver and the client see each other as family, it is best when it is a two-way street.

There was a very good research study in the “Journal of Health Psychology” put out by the American Psychological Association in 2011 (Cite: Vol. 30, No. 4, 377-385. DOI: 10.1037/a0022826). The research is titled; “Loneliness, Social Isolation, and Behavioral and Biological Health Indicators in Older Adults,” by Aparna Shankar, Anne McMunn, and Andrew Steptoe. In conclusion the research paper notes:

“Loneliness and social isolation may affect health independently through their effects on health behaviors. In addition, social isolation may also affect health through biological processes associated with the development of cardiovascular disease.”

For those of who work as caregivers, they are hardly surprised. In fact, experts in the sector have been saying this all along. The families of elderly tell us that they too are concerned and it is often one of the primary reasons they contact a company for in-home caregiver services. I hope you understand and agree with myself, the families, and the empirical scientific research.

I believe no one should have to be lonely in old age, we are here to serve, and glad to help our clients live happy, healthy and with compassionate companionship. As our population ages these issues emerge to the forefront, and it is all of our responsibilities to makes sure everyone concerned is served fairly and treated with dignity. Please do the research and think of those people you know who are in need, we must make such positive steps a reality for all.

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