Pembroke dentist convicted in drunk driving death can’t practice for six months

PEMBROKE —
Pembroke dentist Christy Natsis has lost her license to practice for six months in connection to her past conviction of drunk driving causing death. 

Natis was sentenced to five years in prison in 2012 after being found guilty of drunk driving causing death in a 2011 crash that killed Bryan Casey on Highway 17 near Arnprior. She was granted parole in June of 2019 after serving just 13 months and resumed her practice a short time later. 

A hearing before the Royal College of Dental Surgeons of Ontario on Thursday found Natsis guilty of two allegations against her, one of breaking the law and a second of disgraceful, dishonourable, unprofessional or unethical conduct.

The decision means Natsis has been formally reprimanded by the College, will have her license suspended for six months and have her practice monitored with regular visits until April 18, 2023. The suspension will take effect on Dec. 26. She must also pay $7,500 in costs. 

Natsis’ trial was one of the long in Canadian history, dragging on for three years before she was convicted and another two years for appeals to be exhausted. 

Casey, a father of three, was killed in the crash with Natsis on the night of March 31, 2011.

Source Article

Read more

How the Privatization of Medicine in India Is Accelerating Its COVID-19 Death Toll

Spiraling health care expenses in India have been pushing more than 55 million Indians into a state of abject poverty every year. COVID-19 has only worsened the trend for even more families—like Aghan Singh’s.

To ensure that his sick mother received the best treatment, Singh, a self-employed motor mechanic in the small town of Bilaspur, in Chhattisgarh, India, decided to take her to a popular private hospital nearby. She had been running a fever since July 7 and had also developed breathlessness by July 9. Singh rushed her to the hospital, and when they reached the emergency department around 8 p.m., her oxygen levels were dangerously low. The hospital ordered a battery of tests for COVID-19 and quickly admitted her to an intensive care unit to give her oxygen and medicine. In the first eight hours of his mother being admitted to the hospital, Singh deposited Rs 34,000 ($455) and then paid another Rs 1,96,000 ($2,627) over the next four days. To arrange money for his mother’s treatment, Singh had to sell off two and a half acres of land that he owned in his native village. Despite all his efforts, his mother’s condition worsened progressively, and she died on July 16. While still grieving the loss of his beloved mother, he was further stressed about how his family would survive the next month with most of his resources having been exhausted during his mother’s treatment.

Also in the state of Chhattisgarh, when 60-year-old Savani Bai from the village of Dhanokhar developed mild symptoms of COVID-19, she spoke to a doctor on the state helpline and was advised to go to the hospital. Since all the government hospital beds were occupied, she had to be admitted to the same private hospital in Bilaspur as Singh’s mother, where she was admitted to a general COVID ward. During her 10-day hospitalization, she was given acetaminophen and was kept under daily observation to ensure her condition was not worsening. For this basic treatment, she ended up spending Rs 85,000 ($1,137) and had to mortgage her one-acre farm to meet her hospital expenses.

“I took my mother to a private hospital near my home because it is cleaner and they admit patients swiftly throughout the day,” Singh said. Due to inadequate funding and monitoring of quality control in public hospitals, a large number of people in India are being forced to go to private hospitals for both outpatient, and to a lesser extent, inpatient care. It is a cruel joke that such a move to seek treatment in private hospitals by people is seen as a ‘choice’ rather than a compulsion.

India, which is the “second worst-hit country behind the United States,” has been fighting the COVID-19 pandemic with a fragile health system. The country saw one of the most draconian lockdowns anywhere in March, leading to a sense of panic and causing many private hospitals to simply shut up shop or turn away patients during the lockdown period. “I am 59 years old

Read more

Kendra Hatcher’s Death: How the Dentist Died

Ricky Paniagua Kendra Hatcher


Facebook

Brenda Delgado (left) and Ricky Paniagua with Kendra Hatcher (right)

Kendra Hatcher was a pediatric dentist who was killed in a murder-for-hire plot devised by her boyfriend’s ex-girlfriend, Brenda Delgado, in Dallas in 2015.

Delgado, 31, recruited two acquaintances, Kristopher Love and Crystal Cortes, to carry out the killing after her ex-boyfriend, Dr. Ricardo “Ricky” Paniagua, told her in an email he was in a new relationship, and it was going well. Hatcher was 35.

Dateline NBC is diving into the case on a new episode, which airs Friday, November 13, 2020 at 9 p.m. Eastern time.

Here’s what you need to know:


Delgado Hired a Small-Time Marijuana Dealer & a Single Mom to Help Her Carry Out Her Murder Plot

Love, who was convicted of pulling the trigger on Hatcher, and Cortes, who was recruited as the getaway driver, were people Delgado “barely knew” when she asked them to help her kill Hatcher, according to a profile by Texas Monthly. Love was a small-time marijuana dealer and Cortes was “a down-on-her-luck single mother.”

Cortes was offered $500 to serve as the getaway driver. When asked why she was willing to take $500 to be involved in a murder, she gave the Texas Monthly reporter “a blank look.”

“I was broke,” she said. “And I had a son to support.”

Love, on the other hand, wanted start-up money for a prostitution ring, Texas Monthly reported. Delgado concocted a story that she had connections to a drug cartel, and she said he would pay him $3,000 in a combination of drugs and cash.

The night of Hatcher’s murder, Paniagua texted Delgado to tell her his devastating news. She texted him back the next morning, offering to bring him groceries or help with anything he needed.

A juror who served on the case puzzled over the murder in a piece written for the Dallas Observer.

“I still don’t understand what makes people do such stupid, cruel things,” wrote Casey Miller. “How does a 23-year-old Dallas woman get talked into planning and completing a murder with someone she has known for one month? When does a dental hygienist student in her 30s become so self-absorbed that she must have the new girlfriend of her ex “eliminated” so they can be reunited and live happily ever after? Why does a train-wreck stoner with three kids of his own think cash, a bag of weed and some cocaine is an even trade for shooting a stranger in the back of the head, execution style?”


Hatcher Was Shot in the Back of the Head & Her Purse Was Stolen to Make

Read more

On the front lines of COVID, nurses confront life and death

EL PASO, Texas (AP) — A fire engine wailed its siren up Cotton Avenue and disappeared behind the El Paso Long Term Acute Care hospital.

A man at the front desk held his hand up to a visitor: “Please wait outside. A COVID patient is being transferred.”

Upstairs on the third floor, in an office outside the COVID-19 wing, nurse Valerie Scott updated a co-worker on the patient being rushed by the fire department to an emergency room. She wore black scrubs and spoke from behind a black surgical mask.

The supplemental oxygen wasn’t helping. The man couldn’t breathe.


“I don’t think he is coming back,” she said, worried.

725 people have died of COVID-19 in El Paso since March 23 — the day the county reported the first death tied to the novel coronavirus, according to El Paso Times. Grandparents, parents, siblings and one teenager have died; retired people, working people and teachers have died. Nurses have died.

The bed belonging to the man who left Scott’s hospital in distress would be occupied again that evening. The waitlist for her 15 dedicated COVID-19 beds had swelled overnight from 22 to 32 patients.

Across the city, more than 1,000 people per day are testing positive and the city’s major hospitals are overrun with severely ill and dying El Pasoans. Hundreds of health care workers have flown into El Paso to pick up shifts from exhausted doctors and nurses and to staff tent hospitals erected in parking lots. The refrigerators of six morgue trailers hummed, keeping the bodies cold.

The El Paso Long Term Acute Care hospital, physician-owned and licensed for 33 beds, is pitching in as it can.

“They tried to talk to the family,” Scott told her co-worker, who manages the relationship with acute-care hospitals, about the COVID-19 patient transferred out. “Basically, at this point, it would be better to give him comfort measures… Here there was nothing more we could do.”

She had reason to worry: When doctors have ordered an emergency room transfer of a COVID-19 patient, it meant things had taken a turn for the worse and the patient rarely survived.

The co-worker cursed under her breath.

In the city outside, beyond the hospital’s pale pink stucco walls, El Pasoans went about their day, most in face masks but with few other precautions. People shopped at Target and Walmart and shopping centers. Bars-turned-restaurants kept dining rooms open to guests. A fight between city and county leaders and businesses over restrictions on daily life lumbered through the court system.

The relentless war against a deadly, invisible enemy was out of sight to all but those working its front lines.

The El Paso Long Term Acute Care hospital faces southeast, soaking up morning light, built as it was in 1925 for tuberculosis patients when sunlight was the only cure for another disease that eats away at the lungs and suffocates those who succumb to it.

The COVID-19 wing occupies half of the hospital’s third floor.

Inside, the narrow

Read more

Viral load may predict ventilator need, death risk; coronavirus damages red blood cells



a man in a blue shirt: FILE PHOTO: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Oldham


© Reuters/PHIL NOBLE
FILE PHOTO: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Oldham

By Nancy Lapid

(Reuters) – The following is a roundup of some of the latest scientific studies on the novel coronavirus and efforts to find treatments and vaccines for COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus.

Viral load predicts need for ventilator, death risk

When COVID-19 patients are admitted to the hospital because of pneumonia, doctors can estimate their risk of needing mechanical breathing support or dying based on their “viral load” – the amount of virus genetic material obtained by swabbing the back of the nose and throat, a new study suggests. “This risk can be predicted regardless of how sick they are when they are admitted, what other comorbidities they may have, their age or how many days they had symptoms,” coauthor Dr. Ioannis Zacharioudakis of NYU School of Medicine told Reuters. His team studied 314 patients, dividing them into three groups according to viral load upon hospital admission. The group with highest viral levels had 59% higher odds of becoming critically ill or dying than the lowest viral load group. The data, published on Friday in Annals of the American Thoracic Society, “will have practical implications in our ability to judge which patients will benefit the most from early escalation of care, treatment with antivirals and/or inclusion in trials of new therapeutics,” Zacharioudakis said. (https://bit.ly/3oJijtQ)

Coronavirus damages red blood cell membranes

The new coronavirus damages the membranes of oxygen-carrying red blood cells, contributing to the hypoxemia, or low blood concentrations of oxygen, common in COVID-19, researchers have found. Signs of hypoxemia can range from shortness of breath to organ and tissue damage. Studying blood samples from COVID-19 patients and healthy individuals, researchers found the virus did not appear to affect red cells’ ability to pick up oxygen and deliver it throughout the body. But patients had “clear damage” to red cell membranes, in particular to a membrane protein responsible for helping the cell survive injuries. As a result, patients’ red cells might be more vulnerable to so-called oxidative stress and other injury, coauthor Angelo D’Alessandro of the University of Colorado Denver said in an email. Red cells circulate for up to 120 days before the body replaces them with new ones, and they cannot synthesize new components to replace the damaged parts. This might help explain why some COVID-19 symptoms can last for months, D’Alessandro said. (https://bit.ly/3mMBq4A)

Pandemic exacts toll on ER doctors’ mental health

COVID-19 is taking a toll on emergency physicians’ mental health and many are reluctant to seek help, according to poll results reported at the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) annual meeting. Among a nationally representative group of 862 U.S. emergency physicians, 87% reported feeling more stressed since the pandemic began and 72% reported more burnout. More than 80% cited concern for their own health and safety, and the safety of their family and friends, around contracting COVID-19. Nearly half said they are uncomfortable seeking mental health services, 73% said

Read more

Montgomery County testing mosquitoes for West Nile virus after death

Following the confirmation of a West Nile virus related death and Montgomery County’s second possible case, the Precinct 3 Mosquito Abatement Team is on high alert as they continue to test mosquito samples.

On Friday, the Montgomery County Public Health District announced the death of a man in his 70s who lived in the 77381 ZIP code. While the man did have other medical conditions but the death was classified as a probable West Nile virus case. A woman in her 60s who lives in the 77382 ZIP code has been confirmed as the second case.

At this time in 2019, the county had no cases of West Nile virus, health officials said.


Cody Grimes, manager of projects and logistics for the Precinct 3 office, said the announcement of the death and second case did not prompt spraying in those ZIP codes. Grimes explained that due to the time to get the confirmation on the cases, crews had already responded to those ZIP codes when the mosquito sample returned positive.

He noted currently there are no West Nile positive samples in South County.

“We do spray when we get positive mosquito samples,” Grimes said, adding mosquito season is winding down. “There hasn’t been anything abnormal this year.”

West Nile virus can cause serious disease and is commonly spread by infected mosquitoes, according to MCPHD. People typically develop symptoms between three and 14 days after they are bitten. According to the CDC, approximately 80 percent of people who are infected will not show any symptoms at all.

Milder symptoms include fever, headache, body aches, nausea, vomiting and, sometimes, swollen lymph glands or a skin rash on the chest, stomach and back. These symptoms can last up to several weeks. Serious symptoms that account for less than 1 percent of those infected can include high fever, headache, neck stiffness, disorientation, coma, tremors, seizures or paralysis. These symptoms can last for several weeks and neurological effects may be permanent.

Anyone who develops symptoms of severe West Nile virus illness, such as unusually severe headaches or confusion, should seek medical attention immediately. However, the majority of milder illnesses improve on their own.

According to the CDC, the most effective way to avoid West Nile virus is to prevent mosquito bites. Avoid bites by using insect repellants, wearing protective clothing when outdoors and emptying standing water outside of your home.

[email protected]

Source Article

Read more

13-year-old boy becomes Missouri’s youngest COVID-19 death

An eighth-grade student in Missouri who died over the weekend after contracting COVID-19 is reportedly the state’s youngest death from the coronavirus outbreak.

NBC affiliate KMOV reported that Peyton Baumgarth, a Franklin County resident, is now the first person under the age of 18 to die from COVID-19 in the state.

“We extend our heartfelt sympathy to the family,” an email to students and parents from the staff of Washington Middle School read, according to KMOV. “The family also asks that we all remember to wear masks, wash hands frequently and follow guidelines. COVID-19 is real and they want to remind students and parents to take these precautions in and outside of school.”

“Because we know this will impact our school community emotionally, we encourage you to be especially sensitive and prepare to offer support to your child during this difficult time,” it reportedly continued.

Nearly 17,000 Missouri residents under the age of 18 have contracted coronavirus so far, according to KMOV. The state has recorded just over 192,000 total infections since the pandemic began, including nearly 3,000 on Friday, a record for the state.

Just over 3,000 Missourians have died from complications resulting from the virus.

Source Article

Read more

Santa Cruz County reports 16th death in Watsonville skilled nursing facility coronavirus outbreak

WATSONVILLE — The County of Santa Cruz Health Services Agency reported Friday that a 16th person has died in relation to the Watsonville Post Acute Center COVID-19 outbreak that started in September.

A man in his 90s that had several underlying health conditions in addition to a positive case of COVID-19 died at a local hospital Oct. 20, according to county spokesman Jason Hoppin.

The county has to wait for each death certificate and note whether the virus was a component before adding it to the dashboard, which is why the news came 10 days after the death.

Hoppin said Santa Cruz County Health Officer Dr. Gail Newel alluded to the state of the outbreak during her press conference announcing the possibility of the county moving to the orange tier of the state coronavirus measurement model Tuesday. At that time, there were still people in the hospital but no new infections had been reported in over a week.

“But we are not out of the woods, she said,” Hoppin recounted Newel’s remarks on Friday afternoon.

Hoppin was unsure upon query whether there were still active cases at the Watsonville skilled nursing facility, but he said that 50 total residents and 21 total staff members had been infected since the first cases were reported Sept. 18.

“It’s a very unfortunate tragedy,” Hoppin said.

As of deadline, Santa Cruz County health officials reported 2,884 cases of COVID-19, with 226 of those cases being active. Nearly 190 of the cases were severe enough to require hospitalization. Nearly 60,000 tests conducted in county labs have come back negative. Person-to-person contact through shared households remains the most likely source of exposure to COVID-19 in the county.

Source Article

Read more

When death seems everywhere: some coping suggestions

The coronavirus is the first widespread health crisis in the age of information and social media. So far, more than 225,000 people have died in the United States from the coronavirus or complications from it, according to figures compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

According to one anthropologist, Americans already lack a healthy relationship with death, associating it with medical failure rather than a natural part of life. Here are some examples from a variety of different perspectives of how to take care of yourself and not get too stressed out during a stressful and sometimes tragic time.

___


THE PSYCHIATRIST:

Dr. Joan Anzia is a psychiatrist and professor at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. She recommends taking care of yourself physically — getting at least seven or eight hours of a sleep a night, going to bed and getting up around the same time every day.

“Stay hydrated, eat well, avoid having more than one or two alcoholic drinks a day,” she says. She also recommends getting outside and doing things you enjoy: “It can be an opportunity … to think about what you really value in your own life and what you want to do with the rest of your life.”

___

THE ANTHROPOLOGIST:

Anita Hanning, an associate anthropology professor at Brandeis University, says generally we push “awareness of our mortality to the basement of our consciousness.”

She has this recommendation:

“Being aware of our mortality can make us live more intentionally. That means not postponing important conversations and decisions, and not wasting time on things that don’t nurture us. Tomorrow is never guaranteed, so what would happen if we truly lived our lives with that knowledge? We would become much more present to the here and now, instead of constantly making plans for a future that lies beyond our control. We would invest more in our relationships than in our careers, and each day would seem like a gift rather than something we need to muscle through on our way to a better, happier place. “

___

THE PSYCHOLOGIST:

Dr. Elyssa Barbash, a psychologist in Tampa, Florida, says not to focus on “the potential of death.”

“It isn’t realistic to say that death is more around us now than it was before,” she says. She says the death potential has stayed relatively steady, in terms of the many ways a person could get sick or have an accident. “We can’t live our lives in a constant state of fear or engage in extreme behavioral avoidance simply out of self-preservation.”

She suggests focusing on “joyful activities and things that give life meaning.” That may mean taking a step back from the news and being constantly connected to virus updates. “Staying informed is one thing, but constant exposure is unhelpful and unhealthy for the mind,” she says.

___

THE POLIO SURVIVOR:

Margaret “Elaine” Stalheim, 92, was in her early 20s when she got polio. It was only a year before they found a vaccine.

She remembers how much she

Read more

ESSAY: Contemplating death in a year when it feels closer

MILWAUKEE — One day, on a walk in the middle of a workday, I came across a gorgeous red finch on a sunny sidewalk that didn’t fly off when I approached it. It barely put up a fight when I picked it up with a tissue.

I had hoped to take it to the nearby wildlife rehab people. Maybe they could save it. So I walked back to my house and put it in an open plastic tub on my shady porch with seed and water.

I called the rehab people. I knew from past injured wildlife encounters that I should call ahead. The line was busy. Every time I checked on him, I felt a greater urgency. His breathing had increased and he was shaking a little. Their line remained busy.

Less than two hours later, his breathing had stopped.

I cried. I just couldn’t hold back.

___

I’m struggling. And I have been for awhile.

A lot of us are. There’s a pandemic going on, and we are all isolated from each other. There’s a recession looming, maybe even a depression. And a divisive election, no matter which side you support.

But it feels like so much more. None of my emotions seem to want to hide anymore.

There’s anger, irritation, sadness. Muting life with Netflix has an upside-down reaction for me: I’m crying at happy scenes and sobbing over suspenseful or stressful scenes. I wake at night with bouts of anxiety.

As a reporter, I’ve told the stories of countless tragedies over the last 20 years: mass murders, murder trials, tornadoes where people lost everything, any number of horrific crimes and dramatic hardships. Why does this feel so different?

It finally dawned on me: Death seems so close to everyone, more than I can ever remember. In the United States, for many, it hasn’t been quite this way for a really long time.

So far, more than 225,000 people have died in the United States from the coronavirus or complications, according to Johns Hopkins University. On the entire planet, more than 45 million have been infected and more than 1.1 million are dead.

All that pain and suffering. All those individual stories. And right now, with the numbers of infected soaring in Wisconsin, where I live, my anxiety skyrockets.

Even physicians are dealing with anxiety, some for the first time, says Joan Anzia, psychiatrist and professor at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. She often counsels those in the health care field and says this sense of mortality is even hitting them.

“It’s been decades since physicians have had to endanger their own lives and put their own life at risk just by going to work,” she tells me when I call her.

The last time a life-threatening health crisis of this scale engulfed American society was early in the last century: the 1918 flu pandemic. Less widespread was polio, before a vaccine emerged in the 1950s.

Medical advancements though, have pushed death away, made it feel

Read more