Builder, 45, dies in prison days before facing trial for murdering fitness trainer girlfriend

Builder, 45, dies in prison days before facing trial for murdering his ‘beautiful and kind’ ex-army fitness trainer girlfriend, 26

  • Terence Papworth was charged with murder of Amy-Leanne Stringfellow in June
  • The mother-of-one was found critically injured at his flat in Doncaster on June 5
  • Papworth, 45, a builder, was due to face trial over Amy’s death on November 30 
  • He was found dead in his cell at Armley Prison in Leeds on Sunday, November 22 

A builder has died in prison days before he was due stand trial for the alleged murder of his ‘beautiful and kind’ girlfriend.

Terence Papworth, 45, was charged with the murder of mother-of-one Amy-Leanne Stringfellow, 26, in June.

Ms Stringfellow, who served in Afghanistan, was found critically injured in Papworth’s home in Balby, Doncaster, South Yorkshire, on June 5 this year.

Emergency services battled to save the fitness trainer, but she was declared dead at the scene.

Papworth was charged with her murder two days later and was due to stand trial next week.

However, he was found dead in his cell at Armley Prison, in Leeds, West Yorkshire, on Sunday.

Terence Papworth, 45, was charged with the murder of mum-of-one Amy-Leanne Stringfellow, 26, in June and was due to stand trial later this month

He was found dead in his cell at Armley Prison, in Leeds, West Yorkshire, on Sunday ahead of the trial, following Amy's (pictured) death

Terence Papworth (pictured left), 45, was charged with the murder of mum-of-one Amy-Leanne Stringfellow (pictured right), 26, in June and was due to stand trial later this month. He was found dead in his cell at Armley Prison, in Leeds, West Yorkshire, on Sunday

Papworth was found dead in his cell at Armley Prison (pictured), in Leeds, West Yorkshire, on Sunday

Papworth was found dead in his cell at Armley Prison (pictured), in Leeds, West Yorkshire, on Sunday

Papworth had recently appeared in court via video link for a case management hearing and was due to stand trial on November 30 at Sheffield Crown Court.

The Ministry of Justice said: ‘Terence Papworth died in HMP Leeds on 22 November.

‘The Prisons and Probation Ombudsman has been informed.’

Papworth and Ms Stringfellow, who has a young daughter, had been in a relationship since last October but they had not moved in together.

She had travelled the four miles from her home in Doncaster to see Papworth during lockdown.

After her death, South Yorkshire Police referred itself to the Independent Office for Police Conduct (IOPC) over prior contact they had with Ms Stringfellow.

Private Stringfellow enlisted in the Army in 2010 and completed assignments with 3rd Battalion the Rifles 3 RIFLES in Edinburgh and Chilwell.

She also served a tour of duty in Afghanistan in 2012 as part of the Operation Herrick 16 deployment.

Amy-Leanne Stringfellow, 26, was found critically injured at a house in Doncaster in June. She died a short while later, despite efforts to save her

Amy-Leanne Stringfellow, 26, was found critically injured at a house in Doncaster in June. She died a short while later, despite efforts to save her

Papworth was charged with murder and appeared at Doncaster Magistrates' Court in June. He was due to stand trial on November 30

Papworth was charged with murder and appeared at Doncaster Magistrates’ Court in June. He was due to stand trial on November 30

Amy had been promoted to Lance Corporal but was discharged before taking up the post.

The fitness fanatic rejoined as a Volunteer Reservist in 2017 and also worked as a personal trainer.

Tributes

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U.S. adds 81K COVID-19 cases; more than 260K sickened over last 3 days

Nov. 2 (UPI) — The United States has added more than a quarter-million new COVID-19 cases over the last three days — by far the largest national three-day tally of the pandemic. About 2,300 patients died.

According to updated data from Johns Hopkins University, 81,500 cases were reported Sunday — the most ever recorded for a Sunday, when figures are typically lower because of slower reporting over the weekend.

The United States obliterated its single-day record on Friday with almost 100,000 new cases. The three-day total ending Sunday was about 262,000. The five-day total is about 430,000 and the seven-day total close to 570,000.

There were also about 450 new deaths on Sunday, according to Johns Hopkins. More than 6,000 patients have died of the virus in the United States over the past week.

Since the start of the pandemic, there have been 9.21 million cases and 231,000 deaths nationwide.

With the disease surging in the Midwest, hospitalizations nationwide are close to 50,000, according to the COVID Tracking Project.

In Iowa, state health officials have seen seven straight days of increases of seriously ill patients. The state has averaged more than 2,000 new cases per day, a record high.

In Wisconsin, officials say a record number of patients are receiving hospital care, with about a fifth of them in intensive care. Several patients are being treated at a newly created field hospital at the Wisconsin State Fair Park.

The state saw a record number of new cases over the weekend. Wisconsin’s positivity rate is about 19%.

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Slovakia tested most of the country in two days. Here’s how they did it and what they found

The European country decided to embark on the gargantuan quest to test everyone over the age of 10 after Covid-19 cases started spiking last month. Dubbed operation “Joint responsibility,” the program was the first attempt at large-scale blanket testing in Europe.

Just over 1% of those taking part tested positive, about 38,359 people in total, according to the official website of the program.

The program was first piloted on October 23 in Orava and Bardejov, two regions with the highest number of Covid-19 cases in the country. Nearly 141,000 people, 91% of those who were eligible, got tested in the two regions over the three days of the pilot.

In the rest of the country, the testing took place simultaneously on Saturday and Sunday. The government encouraged everyone older than 10 to take part in the voluntary program. People older than 65 years who spend most of their time at home, people with disabilities, cancer patients, immunocompromised people and other vulnerable groups were exempt.

Mike Tildesley, an infectious disease modeling expert at the University Warwick and a UK government scientific adviser, said that effective mass testing could be used in the long term as an alternative to lockdown to control the spread of disease.

“However, it is important to realize that just because someone tests negative it does not mean that they will necessarily be free from infection a few days later,” he said. “So any mass testing strategy needs to be carried out at regular intervals (every few days) in order to be an effective strategy and to allow some lockdown measures to be relaxed.”

The government said it was considering running a second round of the mass testing later this month, but no decision has been made yet.

The Slovak program used rapid antigen tests which provide results in minutes. Unlike the molecular diagnostic (PCR) tests, antigen tests don’t have to be processed in a lab, so they are faster and cheaper. But they can also be less reliable. While the PCR tests look for the virus’ genetic material, the antigen test looks for pieces of protein from the virus.

The Slovak military has been in charge of the testing campaign which required the deployment of 40,463 staff, including 14,500 health workers and 6,319 soldiers, to nearly 5,000 testing locations across the country.

The testing was voluntary, but those who decided to skip it will have to continue comply with stricter coronavirus restrictions and will not be allowed to leave their homes unless they are carrying out one of a few narrowly-defined exempt activities until Sunday.
The number of older people getting coronavirus in Europe is rising again. That's really bad news

Those who tested negative no longer have to comply with the strictest restrictions as long as they can prove their negative status with an official certificate. People who tested positive now have to quarantine — either at home, or in one of dozens of designated hotels across the country.

Slovakia’s Prime Minister Igor Matovic on Sunday praised those who were involved in the program. “Village and city mayors, civil servants, village or

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9Round Fitness and Sunny Days Entertainment Partner to Debut New Line of Boxing Equipment in Walmart Stores Nationwide

Fitness equipment sales grow amid coronavirus pandemic

GREENVILLE, S.C., Nov. 2, 2020 /PRNewswire/ – The world’s largest kickboxing fitness franchise, 9Round Fitness is partnering with one of South Carolina’s fastest growing companies, Sunny Days Entertainment, to bring at home workouts to the next level with a new line of boxing equipment. Currently available at Walmart.com and over 600 Walmart locations nationwide, buyers can now kick, jab and cross in confidence with 9Round branded gloves, mitts, wraps and a reflex bag.

The rollout of 9Round Equipment comes at a time when fitness equipment purchases have skyrocketed since the onset of the coronavirus pandemic. According to a Yelp report, consumer interest in fitness and exercise equipment is up by 437 percent since March 10th.

“We’re thrilled to be able to partner with 9Round, bringing a quality product to consumers at a time when we know they are looking for it most,” says Rick Mershon, SVP of Sales and Marketing at Sunny Days Entertainment. “9Round Fitness has built an outstanding reputation nationwide not only as a fitness company but also as a brand, and that is very apparent through the initial consumer response to the products.”

Each item includes a pass for one free workout at a local 9Round studio of choice.

For more information visit www.9round.com.

About Sunny Days Entertainment

Established in 2012, Sunny Days Entertainment, LLC comprises a core group of toy industry veterans with the mission of solving issues for retailers while providing ultra-fun, value added products to consumers.

Sunny Days Ent. focus is to enhance the experience for consumers with affordable products. The Sunny Days line includes: Maxx Action Vehicles, Maxx Bubbles, Pop-n-Play Tents, Ravel Tales and more!

About 9Round

Founded in 2008 by professional kickboxer Shannon Hudson and his wife, Heather, 9Round is a specialized fitness center that brings kickboxing fitness training to the average person in a 30-minute, trainer-guided, full-body circuit format. The program is developed around a proprietary and copyrighted system of nine challenging workout stations created by Shannon himself. Since the workouts occur on a continuous circuit throughout the day, there are no scheduled class times. Members utilize 9ROUND PULSE, the brand’s wearable heart rate technology, to track effort, heart rate, calories burned and workout time during each 9Round session. Today, there are nearly 750 9Round locations open and operating throughout 41 states and in 19 countries including Canada, Costa Rica, Australia, Argentina, Guatemala, India, Japan, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Mexico, Ecuador, New Zealand, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Spain, the United Arab Emirates, the United Kingdom and the United States. For more information, please visit www.9round.com.

SOURCE Sunny Days Entertainment, LLC

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Dr. Anthony Fauci unleashes on White House coronavirus approach days before election

As President Donald Trump fights his way through the final days of the presidential campaign denying the pandemic — by lashing out at doctors, disputing science and slashing the press for highlighting rising coronavirus case counts — the long-running rift between the White House and Dr. Anthony Fauci burst into the open Saturday night.



Anthony S. Fauci wearing a suit and tie: WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 17: (L-R) U.S. President Donald Trump, joined by members of the Coronavirus Task Force, speaks as National Institute Of Allergy And Infectious Diseases Director Dr. Anthony Fauci looks on during a press conference about the coronavirus outbreak in the press briefing room at the White House on March 17, 2020 in Washington, DC. The Trump administration is considering an $850 billion stimulus package to counter the economic fallout as the coronavirus spreads. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)


© Drew Angerer/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC – MARCH 17: (L-R) U.S. President Donald Trump, joined by members of the Coronavirus Task Force, speaks as National Institute Of Allergy And Infectious Diseases Director Dr. Anthony Fauci looks on during a press conference about the coronavirus outbreak in the press briefing room at the White House on March 17, 2020 in Washington, DC. The Trump administration is considering an $850 billion stimulus package to counter the economic fallout as the coronavirus spreads. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

For months as Trump undercut his own medical experts, sidelined scientists and refused to take basic steps to control the virus while mocking former Vice President Joe Biden for wearing a mask, the nation’s top infectious disease specialist held his tongue and took the President’s attacks in stride as he continued to plead with the American people to socially distance and wear masks.

But Fauci’s restraint appeared to have evaporated in a Washington Post interview that was published Saturday night, in which he called out the White House for allowing its strategy for fighting the virus to be shaped in part by a neuroradiologist with no training in the field of infectious disease and said he appreciated chief of staff Mark Meadows’ honesty when he admitted to CNN’s Jake Tapper during a recent interview that the administration has given up controlling the spread of the virus.

At a time when Trump is downplaying the rising cases in the vast majority of states, dangerously holding huge rallies with few masks and no social distancing, and lodging the false and outlandish claim that doctors are exaggerating the number of Covid deaths for profit, Fauci told the Post that the nation is “in for a whole lot of hurt.”

“All the stars are aligned in the wrong place” as the country heads indoors in colder weather, Fauci told the newspaper in an interview late Friday — a day when the US set a global record for the most daily cases and the nation surpassed 229,000 deaths. “You could not possibly be positioned more poorly.”

View Trump and Biden head-to-head polling

Fauci, who is widely trusted by the public after a lengthy career serving under six presidents from both parties, said Meadows was being candid in the interview last weekend where he told Tapper it was not possible to control the virus. Fauci has adopted the polar opposite strategy by repeatedly telling Americans that they can change the trajectory of the virus and save lives if they adhere to mask use, social distancing protocols and other safety precautions.

“I tip my hat to him for admitting the strategy,” Fauci told the Post of Meadows’

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CDC: household COVID-19 transmission common, usually within 5 days

  • A new CDC study suggests it’s very easy to get the coronavirus from someone who’s living in your household.
  • The report showed that roughly half (53%) of people surveyed who were living with a COVID-19 positive person wound up sick within a week, according to their daily self-administered tests.
  • Illnesses were transmitted quickly, with 75% of infections being passed along in five days. 
  • The study authors said that people “who suspect that they might have COVID-19 should isolate, stay at home, and use a separate bedroom and bathroom if feasible.”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report released Friday suggests that getting the coronavirus from someone you live with can be quick and easy, no matter their age.

The study, which is ongoing in over 100 households in Nashville, Tennessee and Marshfield, Wisconsin since April, found that roughly half (53%) of study participants living with a sick person who tested positive for COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, wound up sick themselves within a week. 75% of those secondary cases tested positive for the virus within five days or less, according to their daily, self-administered tests.

“Persons who suspect that they might have COVID-19 should isolate, stay at home, and use a separate bedroom and bathroom if feasible,” the study authors wrote in their report, stressing that isolation should start as soon as the person suspects that they might be sick, even before any testing is done.

Being in the same room with a sick person is dangerous

In the study, most sick patients said they had spent many hours (four or more) together in the same room with the people they live with on the day before they started feeling unwell. That pre-symptomatic period is exactly when health experts suspect that people with the virus are at their most infectious.

Read more: Biotech execs hunting for COVID-19 vaccines and treatments have raked in more than $1 billion by selling company stock this year. Here are the 27 leaders who’ve cashed in the most.

“It’s because the disease can spread at that moment that the disease is so contagious,” the World Health Organization’s Executive Director of Health Emergencies, Mike Ryan, said earlier this year. “That’s why it’s spread around the world in such an uncontained way.”

Another factor working against people who share a home with sick patients: airflow. The coronavirus spreads well between people who are indoors, and gathered close together, in poorly-ventilated spaces, so it makes sense that people would be getting infected from those they live, breathe, sleep, and eat with every day.

“We know that the biggest risk is these closed, indoor environments,” University of Maryland virologist Don Milton previously told Insider.

(However, as the study authors noted, it is always possible that some of the participants might’ve gotten infected in some other way.)

In the study, 40% of sick patients were sleeping in the same room as another person in their household, before they

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Study: 30% of nursing facilities in COVID-19 ‘hot spots’ wait 3 days or more for test results

Oct. 30 (UPI) — Nearly one-third of skilled nursing facilities situated in COVID-19 hot spots across the United States still are waiting three days or more for virus test results for staff and residents as of the end of September, according to a report published Friday by JAMA Internal Medicine.

Nationally, just under 40% of all of these facilities — which including residential and rehabilitation centers staffed with nurses, physical and occupational therapists, speech pathologists and audiologists — indicated that it took three days or more to receive COVID-19 test results for residents and staff, the data showed.

The findings were as of Sept. 27, or more than two months after Medicare began to distribute rapid, point-of-care tests to generate results in one day or less to these facilities, the researchers said.

While the number of facilities receiving test results in a day or less doubled in some areas during September, researchers say the progress is not sufficient enough.

“Rapid testing turnaround is critical to prevent outbreaks in nursing homes — and elsewhere — but only a tiny fraction of homes have access to turnaround that is less than one day,” study co-author Dr. Michael L. Barnett told UPI.

“With slower turnaround, staff with COVID-19 and no symptoms will circulate in a facility and spread infection before the positive test comes back,” said Barnett, assistant professor of health policy and management at Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health.

Nursing homes and assisted-living facilities across the country were hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly in the spring, accounting for 40% of all virus-related deaths nationally, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation.

As a result, the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services began to distribute “rapid” virus testing kits to these facilities in July. The tests could be administered on-site and provide results in one day or less, agency officials said.

The agency requires facilities located in areas with low rates — less than 5% — of COVID-19 transmission to test residents and staff members monthly.

However, those based in hot spots — with up to 10% or more of virus transmission — should be testing staff and residents at least twice weekly, according to officials.

For this analysis, Barnett and his colleagues analyzed data from 15,065 — or 98% — of the skilled nursing facilities included in the Medicare COVID-19 Nursing Home Database. The database is a federally mandated weekly assessment of all Medicare-certified facilities, to examine facility-reported test result turnaround time.

As of Sept. 27, 14% of all facilities nationally said they received COVID-19 test results for staff members in one day or less, up from 6.2% three weeks earlier, the data showed.

By that same date, 10% of facilities reported getting test results for residents in one day or less, an increase from 5% earlier in the month.

In “hot spot counties” — with high rates of community spread of the virus — the number of facilities that reported test turnaround of one day or

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SF stops Google-affiliated testing after results take 10 days

San Francisco has stopped partnering with Google-affiliated Verily at its community COVID-19 test sites after the the state of California announced $55 million in contracts with the firm in March.

San Francisco’s first Verily testing site was set up in the Tenderloin in partnership with the San Francisco Department of Public Health and Glide Memorial Church. The pop-up was initially located next to Glide and later St. Mary’s Cathedral.

“We stopped utilizing the Verily asset in August when the turnaround time for testing results were 10-plus days,” the city said in a statement. “Upon resolution of the results reporting, we reached out to the state to deploy the asset to a new site but California Department of Public Health decided that the testing asset was needed elsewhere, a county that had higher infection rates. It was deemed at that point that San Francisco already had high testing rate and low infection rate and the asset was needed elsewhere.”

Pop-up testing led by the Department of Public Health and the genetic-testing company Color now operates in the Tenderloin twice a week in coordination with Glide.


Verily, the life sciences arm of Google’s parent company Alphabet, is one of many vendors the state has contracted with to provide testing. The state’s contract with the company based in South San Francisco was much hailed by state officials, as it offered a platform that screens potential patients and connects them with testing. The intention was to use the platform to bring testing to those neighborhoods most impacted by the virus or those with hard-to-reach populations.

In an April 29 press briefing, Gov. Gavin Newsom said the company was “focusing on expanding their testing with a socioeconomic lens to diverse communities, not just in rural California but inner city California.”

Trump even touted Verily, announcing on March 13 that Google was building a site to help Americans locate COVID-19 testing, misleading people to believe the Northern California effort was geared to the entire country.

While Verily was meant to help reach underserved communities in San Francisco, Kenneth Kim, clinical director of Glide, told Kaiser Health News that the platform presented many hurdles for the homeless population it was meant to serve. Verily requires users to have a Google account and Kim said many homeless residents getting tested had the accounts but they couldn’t remember passwords.

Alameda County also partnered with Verily to open two testing sites. The first one closed by May, and the second, at an Oakland Church, closed in August, according to Kaiser Health News. A June letter to California Secretary of Health and Human Services Dr. Mark Ghaly from Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf and other members of the county’s COVID-19 Racial Disparities Task Force noted many of the problems with the platform, including the inability for users to make an appointment over the phone and the requirement to have a Google account.

Kathleen Parkes told Kaiser Health News Gmail accounts are required to register with Verily’s platform because Google’s authentication procedures safeguard

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How they went 200 days without a locally transmitted case

As much of the world struggles to contain new waves of the Covid-19 pandemic, Taiwan just marked its 200th consecutive day without a locally transmitted case of the disease.



A woman holds a Taiwanese flag to cover her face as as she joins others at a rally to mark Taiwan's National Day, in the Tsim Sha Tsui district in Hong Kong on October 10, 2019. - Taiwan's National Day, also called called Double-Ten in a reference to the nationalist Republic of China set up by Sun Yat Sen on October 10, 1911, ending centuries of Chinese dynastic rule. (Photo by Philip FONG / AFP) (Photo by PHILIP FONG/AFP via Getty Images)


© PHILIP FONG/AFP/AFP via Getty Images
A woman holds a Taiwanese flag to cover her face as as she joins others at a rally to mark Taiwan’s National Day, in the Tsim Sha Tsui district in Hong Kong on October 10, 2019. – Taiwan’s National Day, also called called Double-Ten in a reference to the nationalist Republic of China set up by Sun Yat Sen on October 10, 1911, ending centuries of Chinese dynastic rule. (Photo by Philip FONG / AFP) (Photo by PHILIP FONG/AFP via Getty Images)

Taipei’s response to the coronavirus pandemic has been one of the world’s most effective. The island of 23 million people last reported a locally transmitted case on April 12, which was Easter Sunday. As of Thursday, it had confirmed 553 cases — only 55 of which were local transmissions. Seven deaths have been recorded.

Easter was an important milestone in the United States because President Donald Trump had said a month earlier he wanted the country “opened up and just raring to go” by the holiday.

At that point, 1.7 million people had been infected and 110,000 had been killed by the virus — globally. On Friday, those figures were nearing 45 million cases and more than 1.1 million deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University.

Taiwan’s landmark achievement comes in a week when France and Germany are enacting new lockdowns and the United States identified a record 88,000-plus cases in a day. The state of Florida, which has a similar population size to Taiwan, with approximately 21 million people, identified 4,188 cases on Wednesday alone.

Taiwan has never had to enact strict lockdowns. Nor did it resort to drastic restrictions on civil freedoms, like in mainland China.

Instead, Taiwan’s response focused on speed. Taiwanese authorities began screening passengers on direct flights from Wuhan, where the virus was first identified, on December 31, 2019 — back when the virus was mostly the subject of rumors and limited reporting.

Taiwan confirmed its first reported case of the novel coronavirus on January 21 and then banned Wuhan residents from traveling to the island. All passengers arriving from mainland China, Hong Kong and Macao were required to undergo screening.

All this happened before Wuhan itself went into lockdown on January 23. By March, Taiwan banned all foreign nationals from entering the island, apart from diplomats, residents and those with special entry visas.

But Taiwan has advantages its counterparts in the West do not.

One is geography — Taiwan is an island, so it’s easier for officials to control entry and exit through its borders.

Taiwan also had experience on its side. After suffering through the deadly outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2003, Taiwan worked to build up its capacity to deal with a pandemic, Taiwanese Foreign Minister Joseph Wu said in an interview

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Tampa General Hospital and GE Healthcare’s CareComm Saves $40 Million, Cuts 20,000 Excess Days and Reduces Length of Stay

Tampa General Hospital (TGH), in partnership with GE Healthcare, reports a $40M reduction of system-wide inefficiencies since launching their CareComm command center with GE’s Command Center Software last August. Utilizing 20 artificial intelligence applications (aka Tiles), CareComm helps to optimize minute-to-minute patient care operations with real-time actionable information used in CareComm and throughout the hospital.

CareComm’s Tiles include Patient Manager, Capacity Snapshot, Surgical Tube Map, Observation Manager, Discharge Barriers, Imaging Expediter and more. CareComm also created a digital twin of patient flow at TGH which was used to reallocate nursing unit capacities and optimize the surgical block schedule. More than anything, CareComm’s work has been to serve and enable TGH’s caregivers and care teams.

The program has helped TGH to operate at maximum occupancy, decrease average length of stay by eliminating 20,000 excess days, and reduce emergency room diversion by 25% for the level one trauma center that serves the entire West Coast of Florida. These improvements equate to 30 beds of additional capacity.

“CareComm is not only the center of gravity for our artificial intelligence platform, it’s the center of gravity for the entire hospital system,” said John Couris, CEO of Tampa General Hospital. “We feel sometimes that to fix a problem, we’ve got to build a building or build more capacity. We started to think a little differently saying, how do we drive value to the consumer by doing better with what we have and not just simply building more.”

“When CareComm opened in August 2019, a hurricane was approaching, and we talked about it being helpful during the storm. We didn’t discuss a pandemic, but it’s been a remarkably useful tool in the management of COVID-19 as well as for daily patient care operations,” said Everett Cunningham, CEO of US and Canada, GE Healthcare. “GE Command Centers are now operating in over 200 hospitals worldwide helping health systems and governments through COVID-19.”

In addition to GE’s real-time Tiles, the CareComm team rapidly implemented an early warning system to help anticipate COVID-19 hotspots in the community. And TGH worked with health systems in the local area to share capacity between them through each surge of COVID-19 patients.

“CareComm guides our hospital along the path of automating care delivery. Over the past year, our team gathered valuable patient insights from our command center which we’ve been able to apply to managing reduced length of stay and better patient flow for all patients – especially in the evolving era of the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Dr. Peter Chang, vice president for care transitions, Tampa General Hospital.

TGH is also co-leading a statewide collaboration with other Florida health systems and GE Healthcare to manage beds, ventilators and COVID-19 hospitalizations in near-time called the Florida Capacity System. This new cloud-based system is live and will help to manage the pandemic as well as hurricanes and other challenges in the future.

“The COVID-19 crisis requires a regional response. We’ll keep working together with the Florida healthcare systems and have agreed to share

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