Count on the Advancement of DNA Medicine with Inovio Stock



a close up of a piece of paper: the inovio (INO) logo covered up by pills and a syringe


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the inovio (INO) logo covered up by pills and a syringe

Too often, traders tend to pigeonhole certain stocks. For example, some folks might think of Inovio Pharmaceuticals (NASDAQ:INO) as a Covid-19 vaccine company and INO stock as nothing more than a novel coronavirus stock.



a close up of a piece of paper: the inovio (INO) logo covered up by pills and a syringe


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the inovio (INO) logo covered up by pills and a syringe

Don’t get me wrong. Inovio absolutely is part of the nationwide and global battle against the coronavirus. But there’s no need to pigeonhole INO as just a coronavirus stock.

The company works diligently to develop DNA medicines to treat a range of infectious diseases and cancers. There’s positive news about Inovio’s development of its Covid-19 vaccine candidate, INO-4800, but there’s also good news in other departments.

Therefore, it’s worth investigating both Inovio’s Covid-19 vaccine efforts as well as the company’s progress in other areas. That way, you can get a complete picture of this fascinating biotech company with breakout potential.

INO Stock at a Glance

If the market is telling us anything about INO stock, it’s that the shares are underappreciated and undervalued. You might even say that INO is one of the biotech sector’s most compelling bargains at the moment.

INO stock achieved its 52-week high of $31.71 on June 29, but somehow the market decided that this wasn’t the right price for the stock. As a result, a gradual sell-off commenced.

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At the close of Nov. 24, INO stock settled slightly above $10 per share. Sometimes people say that they like to buy low and sell high. When the time comes to buy a stake in a promising company at a low price, however, those same traders tend to chicken out.

If you hesitate, you might miss out on a rare opportunity with INO stock. Even if you’re only thinking relatively short-term (i.e., as a swing trader), there’s potential here. INO has a tendency to spike quickly from time to time, just like it did in mid-September. This could easily happen again if there’s good news.

Not Just Covid-19

I’m going to take a different approach from many commentators and veer away from the topic of Covid-19 vaccine candidates. Let’s not discount the significance of the other conditions that Inovio is working to address.

One example is INO-3107, Inovio’s DNA medicine candidate designed to treat Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis (RRP). Inovio just dosed its first subject with INO-3107 in a Phase 1/2 clinical trial for this condition.

RRP is a very unfortunate and rare ailment. Caused by certain types of human papillomavirus (HPV), RRP is incurable and causes non-cancerous tumor growths that lead to life-threatening airway obstructions.

Usually, surgery is used to treat RRP. Furthermore, sometimes patients need multiple surgeries, which can severely impact their quality of life. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) already granted INO-3107 Orphan Drug Designation, so it’s great to hear that there’s progress in developing this less invasive treatment.

Advancing Other DNA Medicines

For

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Santa Cruz County Enters Orange Tier; Latest COVID-19 Case Count

SANTA CRUZ COUNTY, CA — More services can now increase indoor capacity after Santa Cruz County moved into the less-restrictive orange tier Monday.

The orange tier is the second-lowest tier in the state four-tiered, color-coded risk system and indicates a “moderate” COVID-19 risk level. Santa Cruz County is seeing reduced COVID-19 transmission levels, but cases are expected to increase into the winter months, the county said in a statement. Nationally, cases have already begun to rise.

The news came hours after county officials announced plans to ramp up testing for the coronavirus and said that an outbreak at a Watsonville skilled nursing facility appears to have subsided.

The following reopenings are now allowed in Santa Cruz County, with safety restrictions:

  • Restaurants (half-capacity indoors)

  • Worship houses (half-capacity indoors)

  • Gyms and fitness centers (25 percent capacity or 100 people indoors; whichever is fewer)

  • Movie theaters (half-capacity indoors)

  • Museums (half-capacity indoors)

  • Retail (full capacity indoors)

  • Bars, breweries and distilleries (outdoor operations only)

  • Wineries (25 percent capacity or 100 people indoors; whichever is fewer)

  • Amusement parks (outdoors only and 25 percent capacity or 100 people; whichever is fewer)

  • Family entertainment Centers (25 percent capacity)

  • Non-essential Offices (indoors with modifications)

  • Live-audience sports (outdoors, regional visitors only; 20 percent capacity)

Residents are asked to continue wearing face coverings, practicing social distancing, staying home when sick and avoiding large group gatherings.

County Health Officer Dr. Gail Newel said during a Tuesday morning press conference that an outbreak at Watsonville Post Acute Center — one of seven skilled nursing facilities in the county — appears to have stabilized. No patients are currently infected and there have been no recent new infections, she said.

There were 74 residents of the center when the outbreak first began in mid-September, and 50 residents and 21 staff tested positive for COVID-19, she said. Fifteen deaths have been linked to the outbreak.

Newel said the center has followed all precautions and remained in consultation with county and state officials. The center is not accepting new patients.

“It’s a tragedy, but its probably unavoidable that this happened,” she said.

Mimi Hall, county Health Services Agency Director, announced plans to expand testing capacity in Santa Cruz County. Widespread testing is key to staying in a lesser tier, she said.

The county is seeking to add a testing site in Mid- to North County that can provide 165 tests per day, she said. Officials have also put in a request to the state health department officials to provide resources that would allow the county to double testing capacity at a Watsonville site and provide 330 tests there per day, for four days.

The University of California, Santa Cruz lab has expanded its efforts to regularly test on-campus students and staff, Hall said. The university continues to serve as a backup lab for the county and health system partners.

Newel urged residents to seek COVID-19 testing as soon as they start noticing associated symptoms and get a flu shot. People are more susceptible to COVID-19

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Cy-Fair COVID count still on the rise

The city of Houston released guidelines for celebrating Halloween during the COVID-19 pandemic while case numbers continue to rise around Harris County and the state.

Numbers from the Texas Department of State Health Services showed a total of 5,760 new cases in Texas as of Friday, with an estimate of 88,206 active cases statewide. Harris County Public Health Data showed a total of 157,392 confirmed cases.

Despite rising numbers across the state and in Houston, the city of Houston put out guidelines for Houstonians on how best to safely trick or treat during the pandemic.


“The City of Houston is not canceling Halloween this year, but we are discouraging people from gathering in large groups. It is important that we keep the COVID-19 numbers moving in the right direction. This requires us to be smarter about how we trick-or-treat,” Mayor Sylvester Turner said in a statement. “Families and children can still have a ghoulish good time without jeopardizing their health and safety during the pandemic.”

One suggestion given in a news release by the Houston Health Department is placing goodie bags outside for children to pick up to limit the spread of contact.

Other suggestions from the department include virtual costume parties, and a scary movie night with household members. They also stated that people wearing costumes with masks still need to wear a cloth face mask covering the mouth and nose under their mask.

Numbers have gone up around Cy-Fair as well. Harris County Public Health Data shows the number of active cases rose from 962 to 1,098 as of 4 p.m. Friday.

The number of deaths increased slightly this well, from 91 to 93, their data showed.

Data was compiled using ZIP codes in the Cypress Creek Mirror’s coverage area: 77040, 77041, 77065, 77070, 77086, 77095, 77429, 77433. Of the ZIP codes collected, 77433 saw the sharpest increase, from 93 active cases to 127 active cases. The ZIP code with the highest number of active cases is still 77040, with a total of 258 active cases, and 77086 with the second highest number at 163.

The testing centers closest to Cypress this week are MAS Katy Center, 1800 Baker Road, which is offering testing between 8 a.m. and 3 p.m. Monday through Thursday, and Spring Creek Church of Christ, 14847 Brown Road in Tomball, which is offering testing from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Saturday except for Wednesday.

Appointments are recommended but not required and can be scheduled at covidcheck.hctx.net.

[email protected]

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U.S. Daily COVID-19 Case Count Sets New Record for the Pandemic | Health News

By Robin Foster and E.J. Mundell
HealthDay Reporters

(HealthDay)

SATURDAY, Oct. 24, 2020 (HealthDay News) — The United States broke a bleak record on Friday, logging the highest daily number of new coronavirus cases since the pandemic began.

The tally of over 80,000 new infections eclipses the previous record of 76,533 new cases set on July 17, during a surge in cases across the Sun Belt, the Washington Post reported.

The country could soon be facing its worst stretch of the pandemic, with some hospitals in the West and Midwest already overwhelmed and death counts beginning to rise, the Post reported.

This latest spike in cases is far more widespread than the waves that hit America in the spring and summer. The geographic spread of this latest surge makes it more dangerous, with experts warning it could lead to dire shortages of medical staff and supplies, the Post said. Already, hospitals are reporting shortfalls of basic drugs needed to treat COVID-19 infections.

COVID-19 hospitalizations increased in 38 states over the past week. The number of deaths nationally has crested above 1,000 in recent days, the Post reported.

In July, just four states accounted for more than 40,000 cases: Arizona, California, Florida and Texas, according to a Post analysis. On Friday, 11 states accounted for that same lion’s share of cases.

“One key way we got through previous waves was by moving health care workers around. That’s just not possible when the virus is surging everywhere,” Eleanor Murray, an epidemiologist at Boston University, told the Post. And no one knows how high this wave will crest before peaking, she added.

“We are starting this wave much higher than either of the previous waves,” she explained. “And it will simply keep going up until people and officials decide to do something about it.”

The Midwest and Rocky Mountains are struggling to contain major outbreaks, while new hot spots are emerging in other parts of the country, The New York Times reported. Kentucky announced more than 1,470 cases on Thursday, the biggest one-day jump ever in that state. And Colorado reported more than 1,300 cases, setting another single-day record, the Times said. In Chicago, a nightly curfew started on Friday, after officials reported an average of 645 new cases a day this past week, the newspaper said.

Things are likely to get worse. The country has not even hit the stretch of holidays and cold weather that is coming. More interactions could mean more transmission during celebrations of Halloween, Thanksgiving, Christmas and the New Year. The winter’s cold, dry air will also help the virus stay stable longer, just as people start to spend more time indoors where ventilation may be poor.

Remdesivir gets full FDA approval to treat COVID-19

Remdesivir’s full approval Thursday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration comes after the agency granted it emergency use authorization last spring. It is given intravenously to hospitalized patients.

California-based Gilead Sciences Inc. is selling the drug under the brand name Veklury.

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Backlog in reporting of test results swells coronavirus case count in L.A. County

LOS ANGELES, CA - AUGUST 12: Cars line up at a COVID19 test site at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, Aug. 12, 2020 in Los Angeles, CA. (Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times)
Cars line up at a COVID-19 test site at Dodger Stadium on Aug. 12 in Los Angeles. (Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times)

The number of confirmed coronavirus infections in Los Angeles County swelled significantly this week — the result, officials said, of a sizable backlog in the reporting of test results because of technical glitches.

While the full extent of the problem, and how much it will ultimately affect the county’s COVID-19 case counts, remains to be seen. Public health officials said Thursday that they’ve addressed the issues, though they expect to receive more accumulated results in the coming days.

Of the 3,600 new cases reported in the county Thursday, officials said roughly 2,000 were from the backlog.

“In addition to processing issues in the state’s reporting system that resulted in a large volume of duplicate records being sent to L.A. County, the COVID-19 pandemic has necessitated a real-time build out of reportable disease surveillance systems that were not initially set up for the sheer volume of data nor the real-time demand for highly processed data necessary to respond to COVID-19,” the county Department of Public Health told The Times in a statement. “As we build out additional capacities and solutions while continuing to process, sometimes there are technical issues with one of the numerous functionalities in the pipelines.”

Reporting issues have popped up periodically throughout the pandemic. The most significant snafu came to light in August, when state officials announced that a series of data failures had created a backlog of 250,000 to 300,000 test results in California.

While always essential, access to complete, trustworthy data is all the more vital now as California works to ward off the kinds of coronavirus surges that are striking many other states.

Already, more than 893,000 COVID-19 cases have been confirmed in California — the most of any state — and over 17,200 people have died from the disease.

L.A. County alone accounts for more than 294,000 cases and is nearing 7,000 deaths.

Separate from the data issues, the county has also seen a slight uptick in its daily number of reported cases since mid-September, “and this is a cause for some worry,” Public Health Director Barbara Ferrer said earlier this week.

The latest data logjam comes as L.A. County is looking to relax some coronavirus-related restrictions to bring local rules in line with wider state guidelines.

The changes, expected to be incorporated into a revised health officer order Friday, would eliminate a requirement that customers at wineries and breweries make reservations, remove the food service requirement for wineries, and allow family entertainment centers to reopen outdoor attractions such as go-kart tracks, miniature golf courses and batting cages.

State officials also announced this week that all personal care services — which include hair removal and massage and tattoo parlors — will now be allowed to resume modified indoor operations.

Officials also said that all L.A. County schools will be allowed to bring on campus up to 25% of their

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U.S. Daily COVID Case Count Nears Record for Pandemic | Health News

By Robin Foster and E.J. Mundell
HealthDay Reporters

(HealthDay)

FRIDAY, Oct. 23, 2020 (HealthDay News) — The United States on Thursday recorded its second highest daily total of new coronavirus cases since the pandemic began, with 75,000 new infections, while eight states broke single-day records of new cases.

Also on Thursday, the antiviral medicine remdesivir became the first drug to gain U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval to fight COVID-19.

Such drugs are urgently needed: Adding to bleak national numbers, 13 additional states have added more cases in the past week than in any other seven-day stretch, The New York Times reported.

The Midwest and Rocky Mountains are struggling to contain major outbreaks, while new hot spots are emerging in other parts of the country. Kentucky announced more than 1,470 cases on Thursday, the biggest one-day jump ever in that state. And Colorado reported more than 1,300 cases, setting another single-day record, the Times reported. In Chicago, a nightly curfew will start on Friday, after officials reported an average of 645 new cases a day this past week, the newspaper said.

The current record for new daily cases was recorded in mid-July, when over 77,000 infections were recorded in one day.

Coronavirus cases have also been climbing on college campuses, where more than 214,000 infections have been diagnosed this year, a Times survey showed. More than 35,000 of those cases have been reported since early October.

While some colleges moved all classes online for the fall, many campuses remained open as positive tests accumulated, the Times reported. Of more than 1,700 institutions surveyed, more than 50 reported at least 1,000 cases while over 375 colleges have reported at least 100 cases.

The 214,000 cases account for 2.5 percent of all known cases in the United States, the Times reported. That tally is likely an undercount because some colleges have refused to provide any case data or have stopped giving updates. Large universities in the South and Midwest reported the highest case totals, including seven campuses where there have been more than 3,000 cases, the Times said.

Remdesivir gets full FDA approval to treat COVID

Remdesivir’s full approval Thursday by the FDA comes after the agency granted it emergency use authorization last spring. It is given intravenously to hospitalized patients.

California-based Gilead Sciences Inc. is selling the drug under the brand name Veklury. It cut the time to recovery from COVID-19 by five days — from 15 days to 10, on average — in a large study led by the U.S. National Institutes of Health, the FDA announced in a statement.

“Today’s approval is supported by data from multiple clinical trials that the agency has rigorously assessed and represents an important scientific milestone in the COVID-19 pandemic,” FDA Commissioner Stephen Hahn said in the news release.

Veklury is approved for people aged 12 and older who weigh at least 88 pounds and are hospitalized for a COVID-19 infection. For patients younger than 12, the FDA will still allow the drug’s use

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Germany’s daily virus count remains near record

BERLIN — Germany’s disease control center says the number of new daily coronavirus cases remains near a record high, as the pandemic continues to spread.

The Robert Koch Institute said Friday that 11,242 new cases were reported over the last 24-hour period, just shy of the record 11,278 mark set the day before. The nationwide infection rate over the last seven days rose to 60.3 cases per 100,000 residents, up from 56.2 the day before.

Some hot spots, like the capital, are much higher than that, with Berlin reporting a rate of 110.6 cases per 100,000 residents, with the district of Neukoelln at more than double that with a rate of 236.7 per 100,000.


The Health Ministry, which said earlier this week that Health Minister Jens Spahn had tested positive for the coronavirus and was in quarantine at home exhibiting cold-like symptoms, said Friday his husband, Daniel Funke, had also tested positive.

It said Funke tested positive on Thursday morning and was symptom free, but had been in quarantine with Spahn since Wednesday afternoon.

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HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— FDA approves first COVID-19 drug: antiviral remdesivir

— Europe faces more curfews, restrictions as virus cases swell

— UN chief says G-20 leaders must coordinate to fight COVID-19

— U.K. Treasury chief Rishi Sunak has announced increased help for bars, pubs and restaurants that have seen business collapse because of COVID-19 controls, saying that even businesses that remain open face profound economic uncertainty.

— France’s prime minister has announced a vast extension of the nightly curfew that is intended to curb the spiraling spread of the coronavirus.

— A scientist newly appointed as an advisor to the British government has expressed skepticism about focusing on the role of structural racism in the disproportionate effect that the coronavirus has on ethnic minority groups.

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Follow all of AP’s coronavirus pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

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HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING:

NEW DELHI — India has reported below 60,000 new coronavirus cases for a fifth day as the promise of a free COVID-19 vaccine turned into a key state election issue.

The Health Ministry says 54,366 new cases have taken the overall tally past 7.7 million on Friday. It also reported 690 deaths in the past 24 hours, raising total fatalities to 117,306.

India recorded a daily average of more than 61,000 cases last week. The ministry also said India’s active caseload was below 700,000.

A political row erupted after Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s Hindu nationalist party promised free vaccination to people in eastern Bihar state where voting is scheduled to begin next week. Bihar is India’s third largest state with a population of about 122 million people.

Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman, releasing the party’s election manifesto, said every Bihar resident will be given free vaccination when it becomes available. She said at least three vaccines have reached the last trial stage and are on the cusp of production.

The promise angered the Congress and

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Trudeau debunks COVID-19 ‘internment camp’ misinformation and rumours; Ontario’s daily case count jumps up over 800

For more on today’s top stories and the spread of the novel coronavirus across the country, please refer to our live updates below throughout the day, as well as our COVID-19 news hub.

PM addresses disinformation, misinformation around COVID-19

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau commented on the amount of misinformation circulating about COVID-19 and the government’s response, including claims that there will be coronavirus internment camps in Canada.

The rumour began during Question Period on October 7, when Ontario MPP Randy Hillier asked if quarantine sites meant for incoming travellers who have no other place to quarantine were to be turned into “internment camps.”

Buzz spread of the false allegation, which was debunked by Trudeau today.

“We’ve seen over the past number of years a rise in concerted efforts around misinformation and disinformation on a broad range of subjects, designed to undermine people’s confidence in their institutions, in their democracies,” Trudeau said. “Some are foreign actors trying to disrupt successful democracies, others are people with extremist agendas.”

“As a government, we need to continue to stand strong, particularly during a public health crisis where the best thing Canadians can do is listen to experts, listen to doctors.”

The prime minister added that there is a “tremendous amount of noise and harmful misinformation” on the internet but Canadians need to continue to look to trusted sources of information, like Canada’s chief public health officer and regional health authorities.

Dr. Theresa Tam, Canada’s chief public health officer, said misinformation and disinformation does not help public health officials and the collective system has tried, through various means, to provide credible information to the public.

“I think there’s a part for almost everyone,” Dr. Tam said. “There’s a part for journalists who are in this room to help reveal the sort of tactics and measures that are at play, including bots and other aspects of what’s actually happening in the social media space.”

She added that there is also a role for social media platforms, who have put some measures in place like directing people to credible sites if people are using certain searches and taking down some “outrageous” disinformation.

Dr. Tam stressed that when individuals are looking at information, they need to ask themselves where it came from and if it’s credible.

“Be media smart as well as science smart,” Canada’s chief public health officer said.

In advance of a viable COVID-19 vaccine, Dr. Tam indicated Canada needs to “immunize the population against [misinformation and disinformation] before the vaccine arrives.” This includes providing information on the safety measures and rigorous processes of regulatory authorities.

She added that getting a better understanding of why people spread misinformation and disinformation is also important.

CASES AND OUTBREAKS

Ontario sees spike in daily COVID-19 cases

Ontario reported 821 new confirmed COVID-19 cases on Tuesday, the highest daily total since surpassing 900 cases in early October. The province also identified three more COVID-19 deaths.

Of the new cases, 327 are Toronto, 136 in Peel, 64 in

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Austin-Area Coronavirus Count Exceeds 30K As Flu Threat Emerges

AUSTIN, TX — The number of cases of the coronavirus is now well past 30,000 since the onset of respiratory illness across Travis County, heightening city officials’ pleas for residents to mask up as a way of mitigating further spread of the respiratory illness.

To that end, Austin Mayor Steve Adler points to a number of locations across the city offering free PPE — the acronym for “personal protective equipment” that is now an often=repeated part of our lexicon in an age of pandemic — that is key in blunting the spread of further illness. These centers offer the range of PPE — masks, hand sanitizers and educational material — those those in need.

“We’ve passed 30,700 total positive cases in our city,” Adler wrote in an email. “Our number of hospitalizations is now at 15 for our seven-day moving average. It’s a difficult reality, but we know that masking works.”

The wearing of protective face coverings has implausibly metamorphosed into a political issue creating an ideological fissure between conservative and progressive people in many cases — despite scientific evidence of the effectiveness of masks in blunting the spread of illness. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention stresses the wearing masks is the most effective tactic in combating spread of respiratory illness that is transmitted by respiratory droplest through the air.

Adler agrees, urging people to wear masks while practicing other CDC recommendations: “What we can control is making sure we continue to abide by CDC guidelines and do our part to drive down the numbers consistently by wearing a mask, washing our hands, keeping a distance of 6 ft between us, and taking care of each other,” the mayor wrote. “Most Texans are still susceptible to the virus, so we must remain vigilant to protect our students, teachers, and the general population.”

The latest round of community distribution points for PPE has yet to be announced by the city. In the meantime, a number of health centers offer PPE to those in need:

CommUnityCare patients can request PPE at the following sites.

  • CommUnityCare – Hornsby Bend Health Center, 14312 Hunter’s Bend Rd.

  • CommUnityCare – Southeast Health and Wellness Center, 2901 Montopolis Dr.

  • CommUnityCare – Del Valle Health Center, 3518-A FM 973 Del Valle, Texas.

  • CommUnityCare – Manor Health Center, 600 W. Carrie-Manor St., Manor, Texas

  • CommUnityCare – Rundberg Health Center, 825 E. Rundberg #B1.

  • CommUnityCare – North Central Health Center, 1210 W. Braker Lane.

  • CommUnityCare – Pflugerville Health Center, 15822 Foothill Farms Loop, Pflugerville, Texas.

  • CommUnityCare – Ben White Dental Clinic, 1221 W. Ben White, #112B.

  • CommUnityCare – William Cannon Health Center, 6801 S. Interstate 35, #1.

Prenatal Care Sites

Carousel Sites

  • Carousel Pediatrics – Round Rock, 1201 S. 1-35, Suite 303, Round Rock, Texas.

  • Carousel Pediatrics – North Lamar, 9411 North Lamar Blvd., Suite 120.

  • Carousel Pediatrics – Riverside Plaza, 2237 East Riverside Dr., Suite 101-C.

  • Carousel Pediatrics – Southbrook, 6425 S. 1nterstate 35 Ste 100.

  • Carousel Pediatrics – Springdale, 7112 Ed Bluestein Blvd., Suite

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