Compass Health Building Communities of Hope Gala Raises More Than $165,000 to Benefit Child, Youth and Family Behavioral Health Services

The virtual event, held on World Mental Health Day, brought together community members and honored client voices and stories

Compass Health’s Building Communities of Hope Gala raised more than $165,000 in support of the organization’s child, youth and family behavioral health services during a virtual event held on World Mental Health Day, Saturday, October 10, 2020.

Funds exceeded Compass Health’s goals by $15,000, as more than 250 community members gathered virtually to celebrate client voices and stories, even forming socially distant “watch parties” while the event was streamed online. Organizers attribute the support, in part, to a greater recognition of the need for behavioral health resources as the community faces the impacts of COVID-19.

“We know that this year has been demanding in many ways – in fact, the pandemic has exacerbated the medical, educational, economic and social challenges that many of our families face – making community support more crucial than ever,” said Tom Sebastian, president and CEO of Compass Health. “It was thrilling and gratifying to see our community come together, and to watch our team innovate to create a meaningful shared experience while keeping everyone safe through a virtual format.”

One of the evening’s highlights included a video presentation led by Amanda, a Compass Health team member, and her son, who was a client of Compass Health’s WISe youth wraparound services. The video revealed that Amanda was so inspired by the treatment and care that her son received, that she joined the organization as a parent partner with WISe almost two years ago. During the video, Amanda and her son also shared how Compass Health has helped them navigate changes and develop important communication and coping skills.

“It was amazing to see the impact of sharing our story,” Amanda said. “As a parent partner, I know how important it is to destigmatize mental health, and the response to the video has been overwhelming. I’m particularly proud of my son, who really wanted to share with others that they’re not alone, and that Compass Health has been such a positive force in his life.”

Presented in part by Kaiser Permanente, First Interstate Bank, Genoa Healthcare and Integrated Telehealth Solutions, this year’s fundraiser benefits Compass Heath’s child, youth and family services. The primary beneficiaries are Compass Health’s Child and Family Outpatient Programs, Children’s Intensive Services / Wraparound with Intensive Services (WISe), Camp Outside the Box, Camp Mariposa, Child Advocacy Program (CAP), and Compass Health’s Therapeutic Foster Care Program.

The robust list of programs supported by this year’s Gala exemplifies the range of services offered by the 118-year-old organization. With a focus on providing a full spectrum of accessible care, Compass Health’s child, family and youth programs are designed to promote positive changes in behavior, help the child and family learn appropriate coping skills, and improve communication skills including learning to resolve conflict and manage emotions in a healthy manner. In addition to honoring the family voice and choice, clinical services such as the Child Advocacy Program offer

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Psychedelics startups racing to go public: Compass, Havn, Field Trip

  • There is a “psychedelics renaissance” in motion, according to insiders in the industry, as shown by a rush of investor dollars and a number of public market debuts.
  • Some of the investors and banks working in psychedelics are the same ones who were involved with the cannabis boom and subsequent bust.
  • Despite the similarities, psychedelics insiders say that there are stark differences between cannabis and psychedelics.
  • Business Insider spoke to five industry insiders, from company CEOs to investors. They said they don’t see psychedelics facing the same pitfalls that befell the cannabis industry.
  • Subscribe to Insider Cannabis for more stories like this.

The psychedelics industry is booming.

Compass Pathways, a London-based psychedelics giant, raised $146.6 million in its US initial public offering last month, and is valued at more than $1 billion. Psychedelics companies Field Trip Health and Havn Life Sciences recently started trading in Canada, following MindMed, which secured a Canadian listing in March.

Meanwhile, the psychedelics industry is drawing attention from biotech investors, as well as from cannabis companies looking for fresh opportunities.

The total market for psychedelics-related medicines could eventually reach $100 billion, according to a report from Tania Gonsalves at Canaccord Genuity. Companies are working on psychedelics-based therapies for treatment-resistant depression, cluster headaches, opioid use disorder, smoking cessation, and PTSD among others, according to the report.

Ronan Levy, the founder and executive chairman of Field Trip, which is focused on setting up treatment clinics and on psychedelics-based drug development and manufacturing, called the uptick in investor interest and funding a “psychedelic renaissance.”

A focus on the importance of mental health has gone mainstream, Levy said. Other factors driving the boom include increasing research on psychedelics, big-name investors like Peter Thiel coming on board, skepticism around big pharma, and the headway that cannabis has made in challenging preconceived notions of drugs, he said.

The psychedelics boom has some parallels with the cannabis bubble

Levy’s firm started trading on the Canadian Securities Exchange on Oct. 6. Cannabis-focused asset manager Silver Spike Capital and Harris Fricker, the former CEO of GMP Capital, invested in the company before it went public.

GMP Capital is a Canadian investment bank that advised cannabis companies including Canopy Growth. Its capital-markets business was acquired by Stifel Financial in December 2019. Other Canadian investment banks that work with cannabis companies, such as Canaccord Genuity and Eight Capital, are now starting to advise psychedelics companies as they gear up to trade publicly.

“I think you have a lot of people who have seen what has happened in the cannabis industry from a capital markets perspective, seeing psychedelics as an extension of it,” said Levy. “You have a lot of people who either made a lot of money or were very interested in the cannabis industry, seeing the cannabis industry going through a bit of a trough from a valuation perspective and a reputational perspective and they’re looking for another great opportunity.”

Though there are some parallels between cannabis and psychedelics, they don’t run as deep as

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