De Gea facing fitness check after coming off injured in Man Utd’s win at Southampton

Dean Henderson was subbed on to make his Premier League debut for the Red Devils at St Mary’s

David de Gea is an injury worry for Manchester United, with manager Ole Gunnar Solskjaer admitting the goalkeeper will be assessed by the club’s medical team after coming off injured against Southampton.

The Spain international did not come out for the second half – being replaced by Dean Henderson – after appearing to damage his knee when beaten for a second time at St Mary’s on Sunday.

De Gea dived to his right in a bid to keep out James Ward-Prowse’s free kick, but failed to make the save and collided with the post.

Henderson was seen going through a rigorous warm-up at half-time, and was subbed on for his Premier League debut for the club.

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Following the game, Solskjaer spoke to Sky Sports about De Gea’s injury and said he is unsure if he will be fit to face Paris Saint-Germain in the UEFA Champions League on Wednesday evening.

“Let’s have a little check on him (David de Gea),” Solskjaer said . “Hopefully he can be okay for Wednesday but I’m not sure.”

While United trailed 2-0 at the break, they produced a thrilling fightback and thanks to a goal from Bruno Fernandes and brace from Edinson Cavani were able to secure a 3-2 win.

United dominated after the interval, meaning Henderson’s Premier League bow for the club was not overly taxing, but Solskjaer felt the 23-year-old was polished in what he did.

“Dean played well though,” the Norwegian said. “He’s a keeper who has been used to being vocal. He wants to organise the team. 

“He had a couple of tidy saves to make. He was safe with his hands. After the first half, we played well again.”

If De Gea is ruled out of the PSG game, it will hand Henderson a major stage to operate on.

Neymar, Kylian Mbappe and co. are likely to provide a stern test of United’s defensive resolve, particularly as PSG trail the Red Devils by three points in Champions League Group G.

A commanding performance from Henderson could make him difficult to dislodge – with a rapid turnaround of games on the horizon.

Following PSG’s visit to Old Trafford, the Red Devils take on West Ham, RB Leipzig, Manchester City, Sheffield United, Leeds United and Everton before Christmas.

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Honor’s next cheap fitness tracker is coming soon, with a big design improvement

Honor has just teased its newest affordable fitness tracker, the Honor Band 6, and unlike previous models it looks set to arrive with an all-screen display.

The company posted a teaser naming the Honor Band 6, the anticipated follow-up to 2019’s Honor Band 5, on Chinese social media platform Weibo, along with a key piece of information about the new wearable’s design.

Apparently, the Honor Band 6 fitness tracker will be a ‘full-screen bracelet’ – that’s machine-translated from the original Chinese, but we assume it refers to the fact that the new Band will have a display that covers the entirety of the body.

Previous Honor Band models have had small screens, with physical buttons below them, as the picture above shows.

The Honor Band 6 is set to launch on November 3, and given the nature of this announcement we’d expect it to be a China-only launch initially, with a global one soon afterwards.

Not Band here

You might be aware of Honor through its parent company Huawei, and both have been subject to recent trade disputes – the biggest consequence of which is that smartphones from both companies ship without Google apps.

That doesn’t affect wearables though, as they don’t use Google apps, and we’ve found recent offerings from Honor to be very impressive. The Honor Watch ES is a great fitness tracker and smartwatch hybrid with loads of health tools, while the Honor Watch GS Pro is a feature-packed rugged smartwatch that we’re still in the process of testing.

The Honor Band line of fitness trackers are value options that give you all the core features you need (sleep tracking, step counting, exercise monitoring and so on), but in a small body and at a low price. They’re perfect for people who don’t need loads of fitness tools but want the basics to keep them going.

Hopefully the Honor Band 6 will again hit this low-cost, high-function tradition sweet spot, and we’re sure to find out soon. And when the fitness tracker gets launched globally we’ll bring you everything you need to know.

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Dr. Fauci warns of a ‘whole lot of pain’ due to coronavirus pandemic in the coming months

White House coronavirus advisor Dr. Anthony Fauci told CNBC in an interview Wednesday that the United States is “going in the wrong direction” as coronavirus cases rise in 47 states and infected patients overwhelm hospitals across the country.

“If things do not change, if they continue on the course we’re on, there’s gonna be a whole lot of pain in this country with regard to additional cases and hospitalizations, and deaths,” the White House coronavirus taskforce member said in an interview Wednesday evening on “The News with Shepard Smith.”

States in the northeast held the virus in check over the summer, but are seeing cases climb again. New York topped half a million confirmed cases while hospitalizations in New Jersey crossed 1,000 for the first time since July.

Fauci noted, however, that cities like New York and Philadelphia are more equipped to deal with the surge, whereas locations in the northwest and heartland are going to have a more difficult time with the pandemic.

“They never had the kind of hospital and intensive care facility and flexibility that some of the larger hospitals in larger cities have,” said Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. “They’re concerned that if the trajectory continues, they may be in a position where they are going to be strapped for things like intensive care beds,” said Fauci.

In the Midwest, cases and hospitalizations are surging at record numbers. Wisconsin had a 7-day positivity rate of 28% while Minnesota reported its highest number of Covid-19 hospitalizations to-date. Hospitalizations have tripled in less than three weeks in El Paso, Texas. Joel Hendricks, the Chief Medical Officer at El Paso’s University Medical Center even warned about the possibility of rationing hospital care there during an interview with NBC’S Gabe Gutierrez.

“Rationing of care is the worst thing doctors ever want to talk about,” said Hendricks. “Having said that, we have looked at that, we’re in the process of looking at that.”

Dr. Fauci told Smith that he doesn’t foresee the United States taking the same lockdown measures that Melbourne, Australia took to curb its summer spike in cases. Melbourne only reopened Wednesday after spending three months shutdown.

“There is very little appetite for a lockdown in this country,” said Fauci. “There’s going to be major pushback both from above and at the local level, however, what Melbourne did, what Australia did as a country, was very successful.”

Dr. Fauci suggested doubling down on masks, distancing, and avoiding crowds and congregations amid Americans’ coronavirus fatigue, and added that the country would “be much better than we’re doing right now.”

For more of Dr. Anthony Fauci’s interview with Shepard Smith, watch the full interview above.

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Predictions of more suicides, overdoses and domestic abuse during COVID are coming true

Nine months later, those grim predictions look like they’re coming true.

“There is a mental health wave to this pandemic,” Dr. Ken Duckworth, chief medical officer of the National Alliance for Mental Illness, told ABC News. “We as a species don’t do well with uncertainty.”

The pandemic, for many Americans, has exacerbated already-stressful scenarios — deaths of loved ones, illnesses, loss of income — according to psychiatrists Thomas Holmes and Richard Rahe.

Additionally, stay-at-home orders and school closures — important actions to prevent virus spread — created downstream consequences such as social isolation, eroding support networks and additional financial strain.

All of these factors are contributing to more suicides, overdoses and violence, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And specialists warn that this mental health pandemic within the virus pandemic also will disproportionately affect Blacks, Hispanics, the elderly, people of lower socioeconomic status of all races, and health care workers.

PHOTO: A teenager spends another day on the family couch, staying indoors in extended isolation because of the COVID-19 pandemic in the borough of Brooklyn, New York, April 25, 2020.

A teenager spends another day on the family couch, staying indoors in extended isolation because of the COVID-19 pandemic in the borough of Brooklyn, New York, April 25, 2020.

Many of these accelerating public health crises already were worsening before COVID-19.

In 2018, the U.S had the highest age-adjusted suicide rates since 1941. By June, a CDC survey of 5,470 US adults found that one-third reported anxiety or depression symptoms. About 10% said they had considered suicide during the last month, and the rate of suicidal thoughts was highest among unpaid caregivers, essential workers, Hispanic or Black respondents and young adults.

People age 18 to 25 may be the most affected group, Duckworth explained.

“We need to take a look at the age impact,” Duckworth added. “In the age where identity is developed, young adults are missing college.”

The opioid epidemic, previously considered the greatest public health threat in the U.S., also has worsened since the virus outbreak. After overdose deaths briefly plateaued in 2017 — stricter regulations of prescription drugs were enacted — deaths began creeping upward again because of illegal synthetic substitutes like fentanyl.

“We were making some improvement in terms of treatment options for opioid addiction prior to the pandemic,” Dr. Harshal Kirane, medical director of Wellbridge Addiction Treatment and Research, told ABC news. “However, there were still major treatment gaps that have worsened now that we have a superimposed pandemic.”

More than 40 states have reported increases in opioid-related deaths since then pandemic struck, according to the American Medical Association.

Overdoses — both fatal and non-fatal — have increased 20% compared with the same time period in

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Coronavirus Data By School In Harford County Coming Friday

HARFORD COUNTY, MD — Harford County Public Schools is expected to release data Friday showing where suspected cases of the coronavirus are within the school system.

“HCPS will post an updated COVID-19 Dashboard on Friday of each week, beginning this Friday, October 23, 2020, that will notify our community about how schools and offices are impacted by community transmission,” Jillian Lader, spokesperson for Harford County Public Schools (HCPS), told Patch.

At the Oct. 12 school board meeting, administrators said 12 HCPS employees had tested positive for the virus, and no students had. On Monday, Superintendent Sean Bulson told WBFF there were still zero students who had contracted the virus.

If a student or staff member at HCPS has an illness that is like coronavirus, officials say there is a protocol to communicate that with those who may be at risk.

Notification Of Potential Exposure

“When the school system is notified about a positive case of COVID-19 or students/staff display COVID like illness as per the Maryland Department of Health Decision Aid, the school nurse works with the staff and family to identify close contacts (as defined by the Centers for Disease Control),” Lader said in a statement to Patch.

Close contacts are defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as those who have been within 6 feet of an infected person for at least a cumulative total of 15 minutes over a 24-hour period. The contact must come two days before the onset of illness or two days before a test was collected, in the case of an asymptomatic person who is now isolated.

Once potential contacts are identified, Lader said: “School nurses work in collaboration with our local health department to institute appropriate isolation/quarantine procedures.”

Below is the “decision aid” to guide school systems through how to handle potential infections of the coronavirus. It was released by the Maryland Department of Health and Maryland State Department of Education.

Courtesy of the Maryland Department of Health and Maryland State Department of Education.
Courtesy of the Maryland Department of Health and Maryland State Department of Education.

“We believe we have a very safe plan, but everyone needs to do their part and stay safe,” HCPS Superintendent Sean Bulson told WBFF this week about the return to in-person learning. “There have been modifications for everything.”

Kindergarten, first and second-grade students and special education students as well as some other special populations returned to school Monday, Oct. 19.

“We just need to watch our numbers,” Bulson told WBFF on Monday, noting while some adults had tested positive in the school system, no students had tested positive for the virus.

If people are potentially exposed to the virus, he said they are isolated.

“They are sent home to get tested, then we do all the contact tracing,” Bulson told WBFF, saying potential close contacts receive both a phone call and a letter to notify them. A negative test result is required before returning to school, he said.

The plan is to bring in grades three through five starting Nov. 2 for in-person learning.

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More Restrictions Could Be Coming This Week

MCHENRY AND LAKE COUNTIES, IL — A spike in coronavirus cases and hospital admissions could mean Lake and McHenry counties could see an end to indoor dining or restrictions placed on sports activities as early as this week, health officials said Friday. Region 9, which includes Lake and McHenry counties, is teetering on the edge of the state’s threshold for triggering additional mitigations — all set up as a way to prevent the further spread of COVID-19.

McHenry County, in particular, has seen a steep spike in cases with the coronavirus positivity rate jumping nearly two percentage points in just one week. As of Oct. 14, the 7-day rolling average for COVID-19 positivity rate is 8.9 percent in McHenry County and 5.9 percent in Lake County, according to Illinois Department of Public Health stats.

Region 9 is currently at a 6.6 percent positivity rate — up from 5.9 percent a week ago. And last week, Lake County was removed from the list of counties at a warning level, but McHenry County was added to it.

Also on Friday, the state set a record for new coronavirus cases for a second day in a row totaling 4,554 new cases. Meanwhile, hospitalizations jumped more than 14 percent since the beginning of the week.

Similar health trends are cropping across the Chicago area and state health officials are urging mayors, police, state’s attorney’s office and other community leaders to take swift action to slow the spread of the virus as people, they say, are not abiding by rules set up to keep everyone safe and healthy.

“Public health officials are observing businesses blatantly disregarding mitigation measures, people not social distancing, gathering in large groups, and not using face coverings,” according to a news release from the state health department Friday.

Meanwhile, at least one school district in Region 9, Woodstock Community District 200, has decided to delay its move to hybrid learning due to COVID-19 trends. The school district only planned switch from remote learning to its hybrid model if McHenry County was on track on four of its COVID-19 metrics.

“According to the COVID-19 metrics provided by the McHenry County Department of Health, the county does not meet the metric for weekly count or new case increase. This number has increased for the previous two weeks and in fact has increased 51% for all of McHenry County residents and increased 42% for school age children in the last week,” District 200 Superintendent Mike Moan wrote in a letter posted on the school district’s website. “These significant increases caused the metric to fall short of the goal to move to hybrid instruction.”

In addition, area business owners are starting to worry what another shutdown could mean for their bottom line.

Melissa Blach, owner of Smoothology Smoothie Cafe in Crystal Lake, says her business has been destroyed by the pandemic, according to the Northwest Herald. Another shutdown for her cafe at 67 E. Woodstock Street if more restrictions are put in place

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With the holidays coming, Covid cases likely to surge during ‘six weeks of superspreader events’

Thanksgiving kicks off the annual season of celebration, but it will be no holiday for the coronavirus.

With the United States climbing toward what epidemiologists are calling a third peak of pandemic infections, public health experts fear gatherings of families and friends could make an already bad situation worse.

“Between Thanksgiving and New Year’s, we’re having what I see as potentially six weeks of superspreader events, right, in which we’re going to be getting together with family and friends,” Dr. Carlos del Rio, an infectious diseases expert at the Emory University School of Medicine, warned. “And we can see a lot of disease happening.”

Del Rio sounded the alarm during an NBC News Facebook Live interview with Dr. John Torres, NBC News contributor, as the number of new Covid-19 cases in the U.S. surged past 8 million and deaths due to the coronavirus climbed to a world-leading 218,097.

“So, I’m really worried that we are facing some of the toughest times in this pandemic in our country,” del Rio said.

He said President Donald Trump was sending the wrong message to Americans with his cavalier attitude toward Covid-19, his repeated boasts about being “immune” since he was released from the hospital and his refusal to consistently wear a mask at public events and campaign rallies.

“The president got infected and did remarkably well for his age,” del Rio said of Trump, who is 74. “He was treated with everything but the kitchen sink, but he’s recovered. He’s done well. So the president at this point in time is saying, ‘Hey, this is no big deal. If you get infected, nothing happens.’”

In other coronavirus news:

  • Trump made the inaccurate claim that “85 percent of the people wearing masks” still catch the coronavirus, during an interview Thursday on the Fox Business Network. He cited as evidence a federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report. But a day earlier, the CDC tweeted that “the interpretation that more mask-wearers are getting infected compared to non-mask wearers is incorrect.”

  • While the White House has been pushing for approval of a Covid-19 vaccine before Election Day, the drugmaker Pfizer said it will not apply for emergency use authorization for its vaccine candidate until at least the third week of November. “We are operating at the speed of science,” Pfizer CEO Dr. Albert Bourla said.

  • The federal budget deficit under Trump hit an all-time high of $3.1 trillion in the 2020 budget year as the pandemic shrank tax revenues and government spending soared. That’s more than double the previous record set in 2009 when the Obama administration shored-up the banking system to limit damage from the recession that began on President George W. Bush’s watch.

  • Eight million Americans have slipped into poverty as a result of the pandemic, according to a new study.

  • Hawaii is saying aloha to tourists again, but only if they test negative before they get on the plane.

  • The Navajo Nation in Arizona is using the sun and the wind to

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