Dr. Jared Lee Named Medical Director of The Steadman Clinic, Aspen

Dr. Lee is a former fellow at The Steadman Clinic and graduate of the Harvard Combined Orthopaedic Residency Program

ASPEN/VAIL, Oct. 30, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Jared Lee, M.D., has been named Medical Director of The Steadman Clinic’s soon-to-open clinic that will serve the Aspen and Roaring Fork Valley communities.

The appointment for Dr. Lee marks a return to The Steadman Clinic, where the Brigham Young University alumnus (and former football captain) served as a fellow from 2012-13. Since then, he moved on to join the practice at Bighorn Medical Center in Cody, Wyoming, and has served as a shoulder, knee, hip and sports medicine specialist there for over seven years. Prior to his fellowship at The Steadman Clinic, Dr. Lee completed his residency at the Harvard Combined Orthopaedic Residency Program, serving as Administrative Chief Resident at Massachusetts General Hospital.

“I am honored to join The Steadman Clinic and to work side by side with world-class surgeons in an organization that has consistently been regarded as the apex of orthopaedic care,” said Dr. Lee. “My desire is to contribute and build on the great name and reputation they have established.

“The time I had at The Steadman Clinic during my fellowship was extremely formative,” continued Dr. Lee. “My experience at Harvard was wonderful—I learned a great deal and have tremendous mentors from my time there. I was then very fortunate to be a fellow at The Steadman Clinic. They do everything right. They take great care of their patients. This model is something I have tried to replicate in Wyoming and it has helped me be extremely successful in building a cutting-edge practice at Bighorn Medical Center.”

Dr. Lee sees the new operation in Aspen as an extension of the work being done at The Steadman Clinic and Steadman Philippon Research Institute (SPRI) in Vail.

“We’re working to establish this clinic in Aspen with the same high quality of patient care that is consistent with the caliber of The Steadman Clinic in Vail,” said Dr. Lee. “We want our patients to benefit from the same feel, the same quality, the same responsiveness that patients have received at The Steadman Clinic since Dr. Steadman founded it many years ago.”

“Dr. Lee represents exactly what we are looking for to head up our operations in Aspen,” said Dr. Marc J. Philippon, managing partner of The Steadman Clinic and co-chair of SPRI. “He is recognized as one of the top rising orthopaedic surgeons in our industry and has embraced the challenges of orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine during his successful tenure at Bighorn Medical Center. I know he will be a great leader for our staff in Aspen and will guide our operations well as we begin to expand our services at Aspen Valley Hospital and our new center in Basalt.”

“Recruiting Dr. Lee demonstrates our commitment to providing world-class patient care in Aspen,” said Dan Drawbaugh, CEO of The Steadman Clinic and SPRI. “As one of our former fellows, Dr.

Read more

GW Launches Clinic To Help ‘Long Haulers’ With Persisting COVID-19 Symptoms : NPR

Patients with “Long COVID” have relied on social media groups to get through the worst of their symptoms. Doctors at the GW COVID-19 Recovery clinic hope to provide treatment and medical research to support them.

engin akyurt/Unsplash


hide caption

toggle caption

engin akyurt/Unsplash

Maureen would have been in her last year at the Georgetown University Law Center this fall, living in an apartment on H Street and preparing to graduate — in person or virtually — this spring. Instead, she deferred this past semester and has been at home in Upstate New York for months, passing time while she waits to start classes again in January.

It’s one of the ways her life has been sidetracked for the better part of a year. Maureen counts herself among the long-haulers, people who suffer from “Long COVID,” a lingering, rotating onslaught of symptoms that has affected patients of all ages and stumped doctors worldwide.

“I’ve been really healthy up until this point,” says Maureen, who preferred not to use her last name for privacy reasons. “I ran cross country in college. I was still trying to do five to seven miles of running a day. And this has just been absolutely debilitating.”

After experiencing all the symptoms associated with the disease caused by the novel coronavirus — headaches, fatigue, a sore throat, shortness of breath, body aches — Maureen still thought it couldn’t be COVID-19. She’d been social distancing, washing her hands, and wearing a mask. And besides, she was only 24 years old. “But I had the purple fingers and toes,” she says. “Once the COVID toes presented themselves, I did end up getting myself tested.”

But the test came back negative.

She and other long-haulers who spoke to DCist say one of the biggest challenges they’ve faced has been testing. They got sick in March or April, back when the District had testing shortages and there was widespread confusion about who had access to them. When these long-haulers were finally tested, they received false negative results — or, at least, it would appear that way since they still had symptoms.

A COVID-19 testing site in Fort Totten. Long-haulers say one of the biggest issues they’ve faced is getting accurate and timely test results.

Patrick Fort/DCist/WAMU


hide caption

toggle caption

Patrick Fort/DCist/WAMU

Despite her negative results, doctors told Maureen: “You definitely have COVID — just ride it out for 30 days,” she says. “But I’m still riding it out.”

The specialists she saw, including a pulmonologist, cardiologist, rheumatologist, and hematologist, weren’t able to provide many answers about what her specific condition was and how to treat it. Maureen says one told her, somewhat dismissively, “You know, anxiety manifests itself in the body.”

Her condition has become the subject of peer-reviewed studies and massive online support groups — some have even begun lobbying Congress about Long COVID.

Maureen turned her attention to friends in New York and found informative articles online, including a June feature published in The Atlantic, which made the

Read more

Bristol stalker obsessed with former dentist found near clinic after being released from jail

A Bristol man found with a“murder kit” while stalking his former dentist has been jailed again just months after being released from prison.

Tom Baddeley was handed a restraining order and sent to prison in August after previously being found with a crossbow, kitchen knife and a sinister schedule counting down to “the event”.

But although he was jailed for 16 months, Baddeley was released a short time later due to the time had already spent in custody.

In October a police officer spotted the 42-year-old close to the clinic of his former orthodontist and victim Ian Hutchinson in breach of his restraining order.

On Thursday Cardiff Crown Court Thursday that officers knew Baddeley should not be in Chepstow when he was seen close to Mr Hutchinson’s dental practice in the Wye Valley town,

A Gwent Police officer spotted him on a bicycle close to the Severn Bridge on October 7 and saw him park his bicycle and walk towards Mr Hutchinson’s surgery.

Train tickets from Bristol were found in his possession when he was arrested at around 1.10pm but he gave no comment to all questions.

Baddeley was seen wearing a face mask, dark sunglasses, and a cap said Nigel Fryer, prosecuting.

“The officer believed he was trying to disguise himself,” reported WalesOnline.

Mr Fryer said the incident in October came after Baddeley’s “exceptionally sinister” behaviour in 2019 when a court heard he spent years stalking his victim who had no knowledge it of the time.

Mr Hutchinson said the latest incident “did not surprise me” and added he was constantly in fear.

A victim impact statement read to the court said although he was relieved Baddeley was caught “quickly” the incidents mean he has changed every aspect of his life.

The court heard is “constantly looking over my shoulder” and that his partner has left him following the first incident.

He said: “My family feel paranoid and fearful for themselves and for me. My social life is now non-existent. My life is completely changed and now I question everyone I meet.”

Lucy Crowther, defending, said Baddeley had “no intention” to confront Mr Hutchinson and “did not intend any harm”.

Ms Crowther said her client accepts he breached the order and explained: “The observation became something of a hobby.”

In August this year the same court heard Baddeley was caught on November 27, 2019, when a witness saw him sitting in a car wearing a balaclava.

Mr Fryer said she found that “disturbing”, adding: “She was obviously frightened and concerned.”

Tell us how you’ve been coping lately in The Great Big Mood Survey.

Police were alerted and two officers stopped the defendant in Chepstow.

They searched the car and found a crossbow, pack of bolts, a kitchen knife, mask, gloves, lighters, and a hammer. There was also a bottle of bleach, sunglasses, surface wipes, and dust sheets.

Mr Fryer at that hearing said: “It is perhaps not hyperbole to call that

Read more

Medicine not chainsaws: Indonesian clinic keeps villagers and forests healthy

(Thomson Reuters Foundation) – Offering affordable healthcare to villagers and indigenous communities living near forests could help reduce illegal logging and fight climate change, researchers said on Monday.

A new study led by Stanford University analysed a clinic providing such a service, set up by two nonprofits adjacent to Gunung Palung National Park in West Kalimantan on the Indonesian part of Borneo island, covering the period from 2009-2019.

Using satellite images of forest cover and more than 10 years of patient records, researchers linked the health programme to a 70% fall in deforestation compared with other Indonesian national parks, equivalent to protecting more than 27 sq km (10 sq miles) of forest.

Study co-author Susanne Sokolow, a scientist at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, said the researchers had observed a strong reduction in the rate of forest loss.

“Importantly, we also found that the more engaged the villages were in terms of how many times they visited the clinic or participated in conservation programmes … the more impact we saw,” she told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

The largest drop-offs in logging occurred next to villages that used the clinic the most, researchers said.

Globally, about 35% of protected natural areas are traditionally owned, managed, used or occupied by indigenous and local communities, yet they are rarely considered in the design of conservation and climate programmes, according to Stanford.

Seeking solutions, Indonesia-based environmental nonprofit Alam Sehat Lestari (ASRI) and U.S.-based Health In Harmony first questioned local communities and found that a key reason why they cut down trees was to pay for healthcare.

With this information, they established an affordable clinic in 2007, serving thousands of patients by accepting a range of alternative payments, such as tree seedlings, handicrafts, manure and labour – a system created with the communities.

Through agreements made with district leaders, the clinic also provided discounts to villages that could show evidence of reductions in illegal logging.

In addition, it offered training in sustainable, organic agriculture and a chainsaw buy-back scheme.

The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, said the 70% fall in deforestation was equivalent to an averted carbon loss estimated to be worth more than $65 million, using European carbon market prices.

The researchers also measured significant falls in infectious and other diseases, such as malaria and tuberculosis.

Monica Nirmala, executive director of the clinic from 2014 to 2018 and a board member of Health In Harmony, said the data supported two important conclusions.

“Human health is integral to the conservation of nature and vice versa, and we need to listen to the guidance of rainforest communities who know best how to live in balance with their forests,” she said in a statement.

Stanford researchers are working with the two nonprofits as they look to replicate the approach with other rainforest communities in Indonesia, Madagascar and Brazil.

Reporting by Michael Taylor @MickSTaylor; editing by Megan Rowling. Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters,

Read more

Michael Jordan opens second medical clinic in Charlotte

Three years after Jordan committed $7 million to Novant Health, two clinics are providing care to communities in Charlotte with little or no health care.

“To see how this has evolved over the last year is to gratifying. It makes me want to continue doing more so that we can keep answering the bell when the bell is ringing,” Jordan said in a video about the clinic’s opening this week.

Michael Jordan has funded a clinic to serve patients with little or no health insurance
The new Novant Health Michael Jordan Family Medical Clinic in Charlotte’s North End community is a 6,800-square-foot facility, equipped with 12 patient exam rooms, an X-ray room, and space for physical therapy, according to Novant Health.

“The impact of the first clinic has been measurable and if COVID-19 has taught us anything, it is the importance of having accessible, safe and quality care in communities that need it most. Michael Jordan’s commitment to improving the health of our communities, and society, is deep-rooted,” Carl Armato, CEO and president of Novant Health, said in a statement.

The clinics say patrons don’t need insurance in order to receive treatment.

The first Novant Health Michael Jordan Family Medical Clinic opened in October 2019 and treated more than 3,500 patients. Earlier this year, it served as a Covid-19 screening and testing site, providing more than 13,000 tests.

“When we came together to mark the first clinic’s opening last fall, no one could have predicted we would be facing a global pandemic just five months later,” Jordan said in a statement. “I’m so proud of the positive impact our clinic has had on the community so far, especially during COVID-19.”

Source Article

Read more

Loss of funding means closure for maternity clinic which delivers half of Medicine Hat’s babies

A maternity clinic that delivers about half the babies in Medicine Hat has announced it will no longer accept new patients by the end of January, and will be closed by the end of July unless new funding can be found.

While family physicians typically pay their own overhead, a gap in Medicine Hat’s obstetric services in the mid-2000s led to the creation of the Family Medicine Maternity Clinic.

Funding was provided by the local Primary Care Network (PCN) and Palliser Health, which later merged with the other regional health authorities to form Alberta Health Services. 

Dr. Gerry Prince, a family doctor who helped establish the clinic in 2006, told the Calgary Eyeopener on Monday that the clinic will be closing because the PCN’s funding is due to end in March, and AHS wants the clinic to cover the overhead that includes rent, utilities and all staffing costs.

Prince said this would be impossible, as the costs to run the maternity clinic are roughly double the amount of what it can bill for patient services — and the doctors are already paying overhead for their family practices. 

“[The clinic] is closing because AHS is backing out of our partnership, and says that they want to rent us the space that we’ve been able to occupy for the last 17 years with their support,” Prince said.

“And the numbers they’ve given us are just impossible. So, they’ve given us an overhead number, which is about double the amount of billing that we would actually do through the clinic in a year.… Our guys, you know, as much as they love it, just — there’s no way you can do that.”

A ‘flawless service’

The Family Medicine Maternity Clinic was established due to a crisis of accessibility, Prince said. At the time, obstetrics was a declining service in the area.

“There [were] fewer and fewer physicians doing it, and got down to the point where there were only two family docs delivering about half of the babies in town — as well as running the regular community clinic,” Prince said.

“It was becoming quickly unmanageable.”

Prince said that some of the local doctors turned to health authorities and asked for help. 

The regional health authority agreed, and later partnered with the Primary Care Network to meet the community need. The clinic was established, attached to the Medicine Hat Regional Hospital.

“We went with this idea of a maternity clinic, a dedicated care centre, and they helped support it. And ultimately, we built a specified, designated, custom-design clinic area in our new ambulatory care building,” Prince said.

Eventually, Prince said, that clinic would deliver 500 to 600 babies a year.

“We’ve had a flawless service that’s been providing great care for 17 years.”

Soon, it’s all coming to an end — and why is complicated.

“The docs want to provide the services, we just need to be able to manage it financially. So the real question is, whose job is it [to save

Read more

Drive-Thru Flu Clinic For Lawrence Township Residents On Oct. 28

LAWRENCEVILLE, NJ – Lawrence Township is hosting a drive-thru flu clinic for residents on Oct. 28.

Residents need to register for the clinic and an appointed time will be designated for each registrant.

Vaccines will be administered by a Rite Aid pharmacist. Please bring your Medicare and/or health insurance card.

Without insurance information, you will be charged $32. Vaccines will be available for children between 13-18 years, when accompanied by a parent, and for individuals over the age of 18. Wear clothes that will easily expose your upper arm.

The township has implemented new safety procedures for the upcoming clinics due to the on-going COVID-19 pandemic.

All attendees will be expected to adhere to the following regulations when they arrive at the clinic:

Contact the Lawrence Township Health Department at 609 844-7089 for more information. Once registration closes all those who registered will receive an email with a time slot to arrive for their flu vaccination.

To register, click here: https://docs.google.com/forms/…

Location:
Lawrence Township Senior Center – Parking Lot 30
East Darrah Lane
Lawrence Township
New Jersey 08648

This article originally appeared on the Lawrenceville Patch

Source Article

Read more

Peabody To Offer Free Flu Shots At Drive-Thru Clinic

PEABODY, MA — With all students in the state — both in school and remote — required to have a flu shot this school year, the Peabody Health Department is offering a free, drive-thru clinic on Saturday at the Department of Public Services.

The clinic for those 6 months old and older will run from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Farm Avenue location. Those seeking a vaccination can pre-register here.

All public school students must get the flu shot by Dec. 31, unless they have a medical or religious exemption or are homeschooled, Lt. Gov. Karyn Polito said, noting the flu vaccine is “the smart thing to do.”

According to Polito, students enrolled in remote learning are not exempt.

The clinic is open to Peabody residents.

The standard quadrivalent flu vaccine will be available, along with a limited quality of high-dose flue vaccines for those over 65 years old, as well as the FluMist vaccine for children, if requested.

The Board of Health said all participants should wear masks and short-sleeve shirts so the shot can be administered. People are also reminded to leave their pets at home.

Those with health insurance should bring their cards and Medicare cards, but no one will be turned away if uninsured or underinsured.

Vehicles should enter the parking lot through the Centennial Park/Jubilee Drive area.

Anyone who has been diagnosed with the coronavirus should not come to the clinic.

More Patch Coverage: Mandatory Flu Vaccine For MA Students Goes Beyond This Year

This article originally appeared on the Peabody Patch

Source Article

Read more

Allina to pull medical residents out of United Family Medicine clinic on St. Paul’s West Seventh



(Thinkstock)


© Provided by Twin Cities Pioneer Press
(Thinkstock)

For 50 years, the United Family Medicine clinic on St. Paul’s West Seventh Street has catered to the working poor and underinsured patients, including today many East African immigrants and neighborhood residents.

And the nonprofit health center has done so hand-in-hand with Allina Health, a 12-hospital, 90-clinic health network that has provided the majority of the clinic’s physicians, 21 medical residents, electronic records, lab services and even their phone line.

Now, Allina is in the process of pulling out all 21 medical residents and finding another location near United Hospital where the medical residents can complete their three-year rotations in family medicine.

By the end of the year, the faculty physicians are expected to follow them, leaving the clinic nearly devoid of primary care doctors. Physician assistants and nurse practitioners are expected to pick up the slack under the clinic’s new model of team-based care.

“The pandemic certainly has accelerated changes in the health care system,” said Sara Criger, president of United Hospital, who said medical residents and faculty had complained of patient scheduling and other issues at the clinic, hurting the reputation of Allina’s residency program.

Criger added: “There were problems that United Family Medicine needed to address. As the clinic made changes, we had to determine if they meet our requirements or not, and it became apparent that they did not.”

The deteriorating relationship between the community health clinic and Allina has led to finger-pointing on at least three sides.

CALLS FOR CEO TO RESIGN

Alarmed by a lengthy period of employee furloughs and other emergency management steps, a group of former United Family Medicine board members and West Seventh Street advocates have laid blame on the health clinic’s leadership and called for them to step down.

Those advocates include former United Family Medicine board chair Andrea Marboe, longtime West Seventh Street activist Marit Brock and former St. Paul City Council Member Dave Thune.

“We’ve totally lost confidence in the program and they should stop funding them,” said Thune, who is circulating a petition calling for major funders to sever ties and for United Family Medicine Chief Executive Officer Ann Nyakundi to resign.

“We want a neighborhood clinic with doctor-patient relationships, real family physicians that follow you to the hospital,” Thune said. “She walked in and six months later turned the clinic upside down. We just prefer she leave now.”

Nyakundi and Jonathan Watson, CEO of the Minnesota Association of Community Health Centers, said operations at the clinic have stabilized since the start of the pandemic.

“When I inherited the clinic, our 2020 budget at the start of the year was actually worse than it is now,” said Nayakundi, who stepped in as CEO last October after the previous CEO resigned. “We’ve done a really good job efficiently navigating the pandemic and staffing to demand. We temporarily had furloughs, but we’ve brought all of the staff back, and we’re actually in a period of growth.”

Critics, including former board

Read more

Dentist West Ryde, West Ryde Dental Clinic Offers General, Cosmetic, Orthodontic and Dental Implant Services in NSW – Press Release

Dentist West Ryde, West Ryde Dental Clinic Offers General, Cosmetic, Orthodontic and Dental Implant Services in NSW

A good dentist is one that will be willing to go all out to ensure that all of the needs of their patients are being addressed. That is exactly what patients get when they reach out to West Ryde Dental Clinic for their dental care and treatment needs.

West Ryde, NSW – There will only be a few options when choosing a family dentist. The whole process can be a challenging endeavor even for people that have been through it before.  It can be confusing to make the right decision, as the dentist will be depended on for the oral health care needs of the whole family. A good dentist is one that will be willing to go all out to ensure that all of the needs of their patients are being addressed. That is exactly what patients get when they reach out to West Ryde Dental Clinic for their dental care and treatment needs.

“We firmly believe prevention is key to a beautiful and healthy smile, and so we will do everything we can to minimise any barriers to visiting the dentist. To achieve this, we do not charge a gap payment from any health fund for preventative services, and this includes your 6 monthly check-ups, scale and cleans, check-up x-rays, intraoral photos, personalised treatment plan, and fluoride treatments. We also believe in early intervention orthopedic and orthodontic treatments, having a strong focus on maximising jaw development, to ensure ideal relationships are formed for the jaws,” said Dr Thomas Choi, the spokesperson for the dental clinic, regarding their unrivalled services.

The practice is dedicated to providing personalized dental care and treatment for the whole family. All of the dentists at West Ryde Dental Clinic have gone through extensive training and are graduates of some of the best Australian universities. The practice has also invested in continuous education to ensure that every team member is better equipped to address the needs of their patients.

For patients that are always busy during the week, the practice makes sure that there are available slots during the weekend so that high-quality dental care and treatment are available round the clock.

Patients can take advantage of the free and no-obligation consultation so that they’re aware of their oral health. Going to the dentist isn’t something that should be dreaded and that is why West Ryde Dental Clinic makes sure that patients are comfortable right from the moment that they walk through their office doors. Senior cardholders can expect a 10% discount on all dental services. The practice is open for patients of all ages and their sole goal is to provide a 100% satisfaction guarantee on the dental services that they provide.

West Ryde Dental Clinic takes pride in the fact that their dentists are members of the Australian Academy of Dento-Facial Aesthetics. Patients can rest easy knowing that they’re getting a dentist West Ryde that will help achieve a Hollywood smile.

The practice takes a preventive approach when it comes to dental care

Read more
  • Partner links