NE China to open herbal medicine industrial park

(MENAFN) Northeast China’s Heilongjiang Province has exported an industrial park processing herbal medicines imported from Russia.

According to local officials, the industrial park in the Suifenhe sub-area of the Heilongjiang Pilot Free Trade Zone (FTZ) has seen the registration of six herbal medicine processing companies.

The park will have an annual medicine processing capacity of 165,000 tonnes, with an overall investment of 339 million yuan (about 51.46 million U.S. dollars),

A new policy allows herbal medicines, such as ginseng and licorice, from Russia to be processed in the Suifenhe area of the FTZ.

Imported drugs can be unloaded, primarily processed and sold directly in Suifenhe, thus helping companies reduce costs, said Wang Tengli, general manager of a local pharmaceutical trading company with an annual processing capacity of 2,000 tonnes.

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China tests millions after coronavirus flare-ups in 3 cities

Chinese authorities are testing millions of people, imposing lockdowns and shutting down schools after locally transmitted coronavirus cases were discovered in three cities across the country last week

As temperatures drop, large-scale measures are being enacted in the cities of Tianjin, Shanghai and Manzhouli, despite the low number of new cases compared to the United States and other countries that are seeing new waves of infections.

Many experts and government officials have warned that the chance of the virus spreading will be greater during the cold weather. Recent flare-ups have shown that there is still a risk of the virus returning, despite being largely controlled within China.

On Monday, the National Health Commission reported two new locally transmitted cases in Shanghai over the last 24 hours, bringing the total to seven since Friday. China has recorded 86,442 total cases and 4,634 deaths since the virus was first detected in the central Chinese city of Wuhan late last year.

The two latest cases confirmed in Shanghai were close contacts of another airport worker who was diagnosed with COVID-19 earlier in November. On Sunday night, the city’s Pudong International airport decided to test its workers, collecting 17,719 samples through the early hours of Monday morning. Plans call for testing others in surrounding communities if further cases are detected.

Videos on social media purportedly from workers showed what appeared to be chaotic scenes at the airport as they were given last-minute orders to get tested. In the videos, people are seen standing in large groups pushing back and forth against officials in hazmat suits.

Shanghai has been more selective with mass testing, targeting people associated with a particular place, such as the airport or the hospital where someone who has tested positive had worked, rather than an entire district.

China has resorted to its heavy, top-down approach each time new cases of local transmission are found — shutting down schools and hospitals, locking down residential communities and entire neighborhoods, and testing millions.

Tianjin authorities shut down a kindergarten and moved all the teachers, family and students to a centralized quarantine space. They also sealed the residential compound where the five cases were found.

A worker for UPS at Pudong airport said one of those who tested positive earlier in the month

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China tests millions after coronavirus flareups in 3 cities

BEIJING (AP) — Chinese authorities are testing millions of people, imposing lockdowns and shutting down schools after multiple locally transmitted coronavirus cases were discovered in three cities across the country last week.

As temperatures drop, widescale measures are being enacted in Tianjin, Shanghai and Manzhouli, even though the number of new cases remains low compared to the United States and other countries that are seeing new waves of infections.

Experts and government officials have warned that the chance of the virus spreading will be greater in cold weather. Recent flareups have shown that there is still a risk of the virus returning, despite being largely controlled within China.


On Monday, the National Health Commission reported two new locally transmitted cases in Shanghai over the previous 24 hours, bringing the total to seven since Friday. China has recorded 86,442 cases overall and 4,634 deaths since the virus was first detected in the central Chinese city of Wuhan late last year.

The two latest cases confirmed in Shanghai were close contacts of another airport worker who was diagnosed with COVID-19 earlier in November. On Sunday night, the city’s Pudong International airport decided to test its workers, collecting 17,719 samples through the early hours of Monday morning. Plans call for testing others in surrounding communities if further cases are detected.

Videos on social media purportedly from workers showed what appeared to be chaotic scenes at the airport as they were given last-minute orders to get tested. In the videos, people are seen standing in large groups pushing back and forth against officials in hazmat suits.

Shanghai has been more selective with mass testing, targeting people associated with a particular place, such as the airport or the hospital where someone who has tested positive had worked, rather than an entire district.

In Tianjin, health workers have collected more than 2.2 million samples for testing from residents in the Binhai new district, after five locally transmitted cases were discovered there last week.

In Manzhouli, a city of more than 200,000 people, local health authorities are testing all residents after two cases were reported on Saturday. They also shut down all schools and public venues and banned public gatherings such as banquets.

China has resorted to its heavy, top-down approach each time new cases of local transmission are found — shutting down schools and hospitals, locking down residential communities and entire neighborhoods, and testing millions.

Tianjin authorities shut down a kindergarten and moved all the teachers, family and students to a centralized quarantine space. They also sealed the residential compound where the five cases were found.

China’s approach to controlling the pandemic has been criticized for being draconian. It locked down the city of Wuhan, where cases were first reported, for more than two months to contain the virus, with the local government shutting down all traffic and confining residents to their homes. Domestically, however, China has called its strategy “clear to zero” and has boasted of its success.

“In the entire world, only China has

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In Hunt for Virus Source, W.H.O. Let China Take Charge

As it praised Beijing, the World Health Organization concealed concessions to China and may have sacrificed the best chance to unravel the virus’s origins. Now it’s a favorite Trump attack line.


GENEVA — On a cold weekend in mid-February, when the world still harbored false hope that the new coronavirus could be contained, a World Health Organization team arrived in Beijing to study the outbreak and investigate a critical question: How did the virus jump from animals to humans?

At that point, there were only three confirmed deaths from Covid-19 outside China and scientists hoped that finding an animal source for the coronavirus would unlock clues about how to stop it, treat it and prevent similar outbreaks.

“If we don’t know the source then we’re equally vulnerable in the future to a similar outbreak,” Michael Ryan, the World Health Organization’s emergency director, had said that week in Geneva. “Understanding that source is a very important next step.”

What the team members did not know was that they would not be allowed to investigate the source at all. Despite Dr. Ryan’s pronouncements, and over the advice of its emergency committee, the organization’s leadership had quietly negotiated terms that sidelined its own experts. They would not question China’s initial response or even visit the live-animal market in the city of Wuhan where the outbreak seemed to have originated.

Nine months and more than 1.1 million deaths later, there is still no transparent, independent investigation into the source of the virus. Notoriously allergic to outside scrutiny, China has impeded the effort, while leaders of the World Health Organization, if privately frustrated, have largely ceded control, even as the Trump administration has fumed.

From the earliest days of the outbreak, the World Health Organization — the only public health body with a global remit — has been both indispensable and impotent. The Geneva-based agency has delivered key information about testing, treatment and vaccine science. When the Trump administration decided to develop its own test kits, rather than rely on the W.H.O. blueprint, the botched result led to delays.

At the same time, the health organization pushed misleading and contradictory information about the risk of spread from symptomless carriers. Its experts were slow to accept that the virus could be airborne. Top health officials encouraged travel as usual, advice that was based on politics and economics, not science.

The W.H.O.’s staunchest defenders note that, by the nature of its constitution, it is beholden to the countries that finance it. And it is hardly the only international body bending to China’s might. But even many of its supporters have been frustrated by the organization’s secrecy, its public praise for China and its quiet concessions. Those decisions have indirectly helped Beijing to whitewash its early failures in handling the outbreak.

Now, as a new Covid-19 wave engulfs Europe and the United States, the organization is in the middle of a geopolitical standoff.

China’s authoritarian

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Telix Pharmaceuticals and China Grand Pharma Announce Strategic Licence and Commercial Partnership for Greater China Market

MELBOURNE, Australia and HONG KONG, Nov. 02, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Telix Pharmaceuticals Limited (ASX: TLX, ‘Telix’, the ‘Company’) announces it has entered into a strategic licence and commercial partnership with China Grand Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Holdings Limited (‘China Grand Pharma’) for Telix’s portfolio of Molecularly-Targeted Radiation (‘MTR’) products.

Telix has appointed China Grand Pharma as its exclusive partner for the Greater China market (‘Territory’)1 and grants China Grand Pharma exclusive development and commercialisation rights to Telix’s portfolio of prostate, renal and brain (glioblastoma) cancer imaging and therapeutic MTR products in the Territory.

Leveraging off China Grand Pharma’s capabilities and infrastructure in China, Telix will enter a significant oncology market, and by partnering with Telix, China Grand Pharma will build on its pipeline of innovative products for Greater China, as well as its strategy in Nuclear Medicine.

The material terms of the partnership include:

Therapeutic Products

  • US$25M (~AU$35M) up-front non-refundable prepayment to Telix, to be credited against future regulatory and commercial milestone payments.

  • Up to US$225M (~AU$315M) in regulatory and commercial milestone payments to Telix, across Telix’s existing therapeutic products portfolio.

  • Program-related investment estimated at up to US$65M (~AU$90M) for clinical costs associated with the development of the therapeutic products in the Territory, to align with Telix’s global clinical development programs.

  • Royalties on therapeutic product sales in the Territory, in addition to milestone payments.

Imaging Products

  • Exclusive commercial partnership (sales, marketing, distribution) for Telix’s core imaging product portfolio:

    • TLX250-CDx (89Zr-Girentuximab) for renal cancer, and;

    • TLX591-CDx (68Ga-PSMA), TLX599-CDx (99Tc-PSMA) for prostate cancer.

Strategic Equity Investment

Additionally, China Grand Pharma will make a simultaneous one-time strategic equity investment of US$25M (~AU$35M) in Telix. The investment is in the form of a private placement to China Grand Pharma of 20,947,181 fully paid ordinary Telix shares representing a post-issue holding by China Grand Pharma of 7.62%. Shares will be issued at a price of AU$1.69, based on the 10-day volume-weighted average price (‘VWAP’) for Telix shares up to and including 28th October 2020. Shares will be issued no later than November 06 2020, following receipt of the placement proceeds. Shares issued to China Grand Pharma are subject to a holding lock and will not be able to be traded for a period of 12 months from the date of issue. In addition, China Grand Pharma is subject to a standstill provision and is unable to trade in Telix shares for a period of 12 months.

Telix Pharmaceuticals CEO, Dr. Chris Behrenbruch stated, “Telix’s mission is to be a leading global oncology company and China is an important future market for our products. We are pleased to be working with China Grand Pharma to deliver our diagnostic imaging and therapeutic products to cancer patients in China. Considering the successful acquisition of Sirtex Medical Limited with joint venture private equity partner CDH Genetech Limited2 and subsequent approval of a New Drug Application filing for SIR-Spheres® by the National Medical Products Administration (‘NMPA’) of the

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Organised ‘overkill’: China shows off rapid lockdown system after latest outbreak

BEIJING (Reuters) – Days after a 17-year-old girl tested positive for COVID-19 in a remote part of western China last week, health authorities said they had tested over 4.7 million people in the region.

FILE PHOTO: Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Wang Wenbin speaks during a news conference in Beijing, China July 27, 2020. REUTERS/Tingshu Wang

China’s strict formula of immediate lockdowns and mass testing even at the first signs of infection has been vital to its success in controlling the disease, allowing its economy to quickly recover from the crisis, officials say.

The highly orchestrated strategy – described as “overkill” even by its own proponents – is unique among major economies at a time when Europe and the United States are facing a massive surge of new cases and often chaotic policies.

At the time the girl was diagnosed, the Kashgar region of Xinjiang had reported no new cases for almost 70 days.

“China has taken the most comprehensive, strictest and most thorough control and prevention measures since the COVID-19 pandemic started,” foreign ministry spokesman Wang Wenbin said on Wednesday.

“The facts show China’s measures are effective.”

Key to the programme are factors unique to China, including the Communist Party’s tight grip on all aspects of society.

Authorities have unimpeded access to personal information as part of an expansive surveillance network, which has played a major role in tracing infections.

The government has also quickly enlisted the help of businesses, which are churning out tens of millions of test kits, and tightly controls their pricing and distribution, issues which have severely set back efforts to contain the disease in other countries.

China has reported just 2,382 cases since June. By contrast, Germany and France are set to follow Italy and Spain back into partial lockdowns, as Europe reported a record 230,000 cases in one day earlier this week, while U.S. cases are set to hit 9 million soon.

MASS TESTINGS

In August, Beijing ordered all major hospitals in the country to offer testing, and said there should be one urban testing base constructed for every million residents, with the capacity to scale up to 30,000 tests a day in a local outbreak.

Regions are also required to share resources, in sharp contrast to the early days of the outbreak, when several cities were accused of stealing equipment from each other.

The system, like all Chinese Communist blueprints, is highly structured around specific targets; testing teams should be able to complete a campaign within seven days.

Earlier this month, almost 11 million test results were delivered in around five days in the eastern port city of Qingdao. In Wuhan, the initial epicentre of the pandemic, over 9 million samples were taken over 10 days in May.

The mass testings are mandatory. Some are held in outdoor sporting venues and city parks, with hundreds of people lining up.

PUTTING PEOPLE AT EASE

Epidemiologists have called into question the efficacy of the mass testing events, noting some patients require multiple tests over time

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He got a coronavirus vaccine in China, but had to keep it secret. Why?

The oil company worker wondered why he had to keep his vaccination a secret. Questions raced through his head as he read the confidentiality agreement, which threatened he would be disciplined if he told anyone outside company management about the COVID-19 shot he was waiting to get.



a man wearing a hat: An employee inspects syringes of the coronavirus vaccine produced by Sinovac at its factory in Beijing. (Ng Han Guan / Associated Press)


© (Ng Han Guan / Associated Press)
An employee inspects syringes of the coronavirus vaccine produced by Sinovac at its factory in Beijing. (Ng Han Guan / Associated Press)

What if something went wrong? Who would take responsibility? The worker knew the vaccine maker, China National Biotec Group — part of the state-owned pharmaceutical group Sinopharm — was conducting trials of this vaccine on hundreds of thousands of volunteers in the United Arab Emirates, Peru, Morocco and other countries.

“At least they’re in a monitored, controlled situation,” he said of those trials, watching as hundreds of his co-workers lined up around him to get their injection at a clinic in Beijing. “But for us, they can’t make any guarantees. This is us making a sacrifice for the nation.”

The employee — who did not give his name for fear of reprisal — is one of hundreds of thousands of Chinese citizens who have received COVID-19 vaccines before they have been proved safe in clinical trials. China’s military began getting vaccinations in June. Medical workers and employees of state-owned companies working abroad were soon included in an “emergency use” program. In September, a China National Biotec executive said 350,000 people outside clinical trials had already received the vaccine.

Early vaccinations of high-profile people have become a way to show trust in China’s medical system after a 2018 scandal in which children were exposed to faulty vaccines for diphtheria and tetanus.

In March, images of Chen Wei, a military general and epidemiologist leading one of the coronavirus vaccine efforts, were widely shared by social media users, praising her for receiving an injection before it had been tested on animals. Yin Weidong, chief executive of biopharmaceutical company Sinovac, told reporters last month that he was one of the first to take the vaccine after it passed the first two trial phases. About 90% of Sinovac’s employees have voluntarily taken the vaccine early, the company said.

This month, China National Biotec Group reportedly began offering free vaccines to Chinese students planning to go abroad, according to a company website that was later taken down. More than 93,000 people had signed up for the free vaccine, the website said. Students who had been vaccinated also spoke to local and foreign media about their experiences. But state media later reported that the free vaccine offer was “not real.”

Several cities in Zhejiang province have also reportedly begun offering vaccines made by Sinovac. In Yiwu city, Chinese media found a clinic offering vaccination shots for about $30 each on a “first come, first served” basis. Most of those receiving shots were people planning international travel, though they did not have to prove it, according to local reports.



A technician works in a lab at Sinovac Biotech in Beijing on Sept. 24, 2020. The lab is working on a potential coronavirus vaccine. (Kevin Frayer / Getty Images)


© (Kevin

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The Latest: China Says Latest Outbreak Appears Contained | World News

BEIJING — Officials in the northwestern China region of Xinjiang say they believe they have contained the country’s latest coronavirus outbreak.

Xinjiang reported 23 new confirmed cases Thursday, all involving people who had initially tested positive but displayed no symptoms. It was the second consecutive day in which newly confirmed cases emerged entirely among such people.

Officials say that development appears to show new infections have been curbed in Kashgar prefecture, where the outbreak appeared Saturday. They say all the cases seem to be linked to a garment factory that employs 252 people and has since being sealed off.

More than 4.7 million people in Kashgar have been tested for the virus.

HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— US plans to buy initial antibody doses from Eli Lilly

— Task force member Giroir: Cases, hospitalizations, deaths up in US – not just testing

— President Emmanuel Macron announces second national lockdown in France starting Friday. German officials agreed four-week partial lockdown.

— Belgium and Czech Republic top Europe’s highest number of coronavirus cases per 100,000 citizens, ahead of hotbeds France and Spain.

— Love blossoms amid pandemic for two TikTok creators in Los Angeles, using goofy dance videos, heartfelt vlogs and affirmations.

— Follow AP’s coronavirus pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING:

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — Officials in Anchorage, Alaska, say the city is on a “dangerous path” as coronavirus cases rise and are urging people to avoid gatherings and follow orders to wear masks in public.

Acting Mayor Austin Quinn-Davidson says she has been meeting with business leaders, health officials and others to make decisions that protect health but also impose minimal restrictions so businesses can stay open.

The mayor says that “none of us wants another hunker-down” order.

The city’s health director says that after months of dealing with the pandemic, some people may have let down their guard. She says people should stay home except to get food, exercise outside or go to work. She says it is important to wear masks and social distance in public and to avoid contact with those at higher risk for severe illness.

MINNEAPOLIS — Minnesota health officials are warning against traditional Halloween festivities amid the recent rise in coronavirus cases statewide.

Officials say that instead of traditional trick-or-treating and indoor haunted houses, people should look to lower risk activities like carving pumpkins and decorating homes or holding virtual gatherings.

he state’s infectious diseases director said Wednesday that warmer weather this weekend may encourage outdoor gatherings, but cautioned against disregarding health guidelines with virus infections rising steadily.

Officials reported 1,916 new coronavirus cases and 19 new COVID-19 deaths. Daily case counts statewide have exceeded 2,000 three times in the past two weeks, and the state has reported more than 1,000 new daily cases for the last 21 days.

DES MOINES, Iowa — Medical professionals in Iowa are expressing concerns that a surge in coronavirus infections and hospitalizations could overwhelm medical facilities if

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You Can Now Get a COVID-19 Vaccine in China. That Might Not Be a Good Thing

CHINA-HEALTH-VIRUS
CHINA-HEALTH-VIRUS

A staff member works during a media tour of a new factory built to produce a COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine at Sinovac, one of 11 Chinese companies approved to carry out clinical trials of potential coronavirus vaccines, in Beijing on September 24, 2020. Credit – Wang Zhao–AFP/Getty Images

Li Shurui didn’t hesitate. Faced with putting his life on hold indefinitely or the risk of catching COVID-19 by returning to university in the U.K., the 22-year-old business student decided to roll up his sleeve and receive an experimental coronavirus vaccine.

Two injections made by Beijing Kexing Biological cost 2,000 rmb ($300) at the private Taihe Hospital in the Chinese capital. The treatment still hasn’t passed final (Stage 3) clinical trials but is already being offered to the public on a first come, first served basis. Anyone can turn up, pay their money and get the jab. Li says hundreds were queuing to get immunized at the same time as him.

“I’m a little worried about side effects but more worried catching the virus overseas,” Li tells TIME. “But I haven’t had any problems from the jabs so far.”

It’s not just the Kexing vaccine on offer in China. An unofficial vaccine rollout is gathering pace despite the warnings of international public health experts. In September, state-owned SinoPharm revealed that hundreds of thousands of Chinese had already taken its experimental COVID-19 vaccines as part of a state initiative to protect frontline health workers and officials traveling to high-risk nations. In the eastern manufacturing hub of Yiwu this week, hundreds of people queued for a $60 dose of the CoronaVac vaccine made by private firm SinoVac.

Read more: ‘We Will Share Our Vaccine with the World.’ Inside the Chinese Biotech Firm Leading the Fight Against COVID-19

“This is insane,” Adam Kamradt-Scott, associate professor specializing in global health security at the University of Sydney, says of China’s gung-ho vaccine rollout. “It is just unsound public health practice. We have previous examples of where vaccines that have not gone through sufficient clinical trials have demonstrated adverse reactions with long-term health consequences.”

As the coronavirus pandemic approaches its 11th month, with over 40 million cases and 1.1 million deaths globally, longing for a miracle cure becomes more desperate. But the consequences of a vaccine misstep could also be dire. In 1976, a rushed campaign to immunize millions of Americans against swine flu subsequently resulted in a small proportion developing chronic fatigue syndrome and helped spark the modern anti-vaxxer movement. Handing out a pre-approval vaccine without sufficient monitoring of efficacy and health of participants risks stoking public misinformation.

Read more: How an Election-Year Vaccine Rollout in 1976 Backfired

What’s more, since COVID-19 cases are so low in China, Stage 3 trials—when the vaccine is given thousands to see how many become infected, compared with volunteers who received a placebo—can only be conducted overseas. There have also not been any “challenge” trials where scientists deliberately expose vaccinated volunteers to the virus to test immunity. (Although controversial,

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ImmunoGen and Huadong Medicine Announce Strategic Collaboration to Develop and Commercialize Mirvetuximab Soravtansine in Greater China

Partnership Accelerates Development Path for Mirvetuximab in Greater China and Expands Huadong Medicine’s Oncology Portfolio with Innovative ADC

Combines ImmunoGen’s Lead Clinical Program with Huadong’s Regional Oncology Expertise

ImmunoGen to Receive $40 Million Upfront Payment and is Eligible to Receive Up to $265 Million in Potential Development, Regulatory, and Commercial Milestone Payments

ImmunoGen, Inc. (Nasdaq: IMGN), a leader in the expanding field of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) for the treatment of cancer, and Hangzhou Zhongmei Huadong Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., a wholly-owned subsidiary of Huadong Medicine Co., Ltd., today announced that the companies have entered into an exclusive collaboration to develop and commercialize mirvetuximab soravtansine in mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau, and Taiwan (Greater China). ImmunoGen will retain all rights to mirvetuximab in the rest of the world.

This collaboration provides ImmunoGen with access to the second largest pharmaceutical market in the world via Huadong Medicine’s development, regulatory, and commercial capabilities, while supporting Huadong Medicine’s growth strategy to build a deep portfolio of oncology, endocrinology, and autoimmunology candidates. Mirvetuximab adds a compelling late-stage oncology asset to Huadong Medicine’s portfolio.

“With extensive regional experience, the right development and regulatory capabilities, and access to a deep local network of hospitals and clinics across Greater China, Huadong Medicine is an ideal partner for us,” said Mark Enyedy, ImmunoGen’s President and Chief Executive Officer. “This collaboration reflects mirvetuximab’s potential to deliver meaningful value to ovarian cancer patients as well as our ability to translate our work in ADCs into long-term relationships that create sustainable value for ImmunoGen and our partners. We look forward to working closely with Huadong Medicine to develop and commercialize mirvetuximab in Greater China as we advance the mirvetuximab program and prepare for the first potential commercial launch in the United States in 2022.”

“ImmunoGen is a leader in the development of ADCs for the treatment of cancer and this partnership provides us with a late-stage asset that will enable us to further expand our pipeline of innovative oncology programs,” said Liang Lu, Chairman of Huadong Medicine. “The compelling clinical data generated to date highlights mirvetuximab’s potential to be a promising therapy for an extremely difficult to treat disease and we look forward to beginning its development as we seek to meet the growing needs of ovarian cancer patients in Greater China.”

Under the terms of the agreement, ImmunoGen will receive an upfront payment of $40 million and is eligible to receive additional milestone payments of up to $265 million as certain development, regulatory, and commercial objectives are achieved. ImmunoGen is also eligible to receive low double digit to high teen royalties as a percentage of mirvetuximab commercial sales by Huadong Medicine in Greater China.

Huadong Medicine will be responsible for the development as well as potential regulatory submissions and commercialization of mirvetuximab in Greater China pursuant to input from a joint steering committee comprised of individuals from both companies. Huadong Medicine will also have the opportunity to participate in global clinical studies of mirvetuximab conducted by ImmunoGen. ImmunoGen will continue

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