Influencer Emily Skye Says Getting Her Fitness Back After Her Second Child Is ‘a Lot Slower’

Emily Skye is working hard at getting back to her pre-pregnancy fitness level — but if it doesn’t happen, she’s not going to “beat myself up about it,” the influencer said.



Ximena Navarrete standing in a room: Emily Skye/instagram Emily Skye


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Emily Skye/instagram Emily Skye

Skye, 35, welcomed her second child, son Izaac, in a very unexpected home birth on June 18. Once she recovered enough to start exercising again, the trainer has been working on rebuilding her fitness, but noticed that it’s been slow going this time around compared to her pregnancy with daughter Mia, 2½.



Ximena Navarrete standing in a room: Emily Skye


© Emily Skye/instagram
Emily Skye

“My journey to getting my fitness back seems to be a lot slower than it was after having Mia. I am a lot busier now though with my businesses and kids and fitting in my training is more challenging,” she wrote on Instagram, alongside a video of herself in a bikini.

RELATED: Influencer Emily Skye Has a ‘New Appreciation’ for Her Body After Unexpectedly Giving Birth at Home

“I’m not gonna let it get me down though — we all know comparison can be the thief of joy and it can even be detrimental to compare to your previous self! We’re always changing and our bodies go through SO much during pregnancy and after!”

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Skye instead focuses on how she feels mentally and physically, and “what my body DOES rather than how it ‘looks.’ ”

“That’s not to say I don’t have fitness goals though and that I’m not doing everything in my power to reach those goals, but it’s about controlling what you have the ability to control,” she explained. “If I can’t then I don’t beat myself up about it. There’s just no point! 🤷🏻‍♀️ I’m doing the best I can and that’s good enough.”

RELATED: Influencer Emily Skye Shares an Honest Look at Her Postpartum Body: ‘You’ve Got to Be Patient’

Skye, who lives in Queensland, Australia with Izaac, Mia and her partner, Declan, said that while she isn’t losing weight and building muscle at the same speed as her last pregnancy, she’s doing far better mentally. After Mia was born, Skye dealt with postpartum depression, but hasn’t experienced it so far.

“I’m in a far better headspace this time. It’s flat out and stressful and Izaac is a much more difficult baby than Mia was but I’m grateful I haven’t (yet) experienced postnatal depression like I did after having Mia. 🙏🏼 ”

RELATED VIDEO: Fitness Influencer Emily Skye on Her ‘Crazy’ Home Birth

Skye also urged her followers to “please never be ashamed of suffering from mental health issues” like postpartum depression, and to reach out if they need help.

“It’s more common than we think and you are not alone,” she said.

Skye previously told PEOPLE that her more-positive mindset is something she developed from getting older.

“I feel like I’m just getting better and better with self-love and acceptance,” she said. “It

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Compass Health Building Communities of Hope Gala Raises More Than $165,000 to Benefit Child, Youth and Family Behavioral Health Services

The virtual event, held on World Mental Health Day, brought together community members and honored client voices and stories

Compass Health’s Building Communities of Hope Gala raised more than $165,000 in support of the organization’s child, youth and family behavioral health services during a virtual event held on World Mental Health Day, Saturday, October 10, 2020.

Funds exceeded Compass Health’s goals by $15,000, as more than 250 community members gathered virtually to celebrate client voices and stories, even forming socially distant “watch parties” while the event was streamed online. Organizers attribute the support, in part, to a greater recognition of the need for behavioral health resources as the community faces the impacts of COVID-19.

“We know that this year has been demanding in many ways – in fact, the pandemic has exacerbated the medical, educational, economic and social challenges that many of our families face – making community support more crucial than ever,” said Tom Sebastian, president and CEO of Compass Health. “It was thrilling and gratifying to see our community come together, and to watch our team innovate to create a meaningful shared experience while keeping everyone safe through a virtual format.”

One of the evening’s highlights included a video presentation led by Amanda, a Compass Health team member, and her son, who was a client of Compass Health’s WISe youth wraparound services. The video revealed that Amanda was so inspired by the treatment and care that her son received, that she joined the organization as a parent partner with WISe almost two years ago. During the video, Amanda and her son also shared how Compass Health has helped them navigate changes and develop important communication and coping skills.

“It was amazing to see the impact of sharing our story,” Amanda said. “As a parent partner, I know how important it is to destigmatize mental health, and the response to the video has been overwhelming. I’m particularly proud of my son, who really wanted to share with others that they’re not alone, and that Compass Health has been such a positive force in his life.”

Presented in part by Kaiser Permanente, First Interstate Bank, Genoa Healthcare and Integrated Telehealth Solutions, this year’s fundraiser benefits Compass Heath’s child, youth and family services. The primary beneficiaries are Compass Health’s Child and Family Outpatient Programs, Children’s Intensive Services / Wraparound with Intensive Services (WISe), Camp Outside the Box, Camp Mariposa, Child Advocacy Program (CAP), and Compass Health’s Therapeutic Foster Care Program.

The robust list of programs supported by this year’s Gala exemplifies the range of services offered by the 118-year-old organization. With a focus on providing a full spectrum of accessible care, Compass Health’s child, family and youth programs are designed to promote positive changes in behavior, help the child and family learn appropriate coping skills, and improve communication skills including learning to resolve conflict and manage emotions in a healthy manner. In addition to honoring the family voice and choice, clinical services such as the Child Advocacy Program offer

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Epilepsy Meds During Pregnancy May Raise Autism Risk in Child | Health News

By Serena Gordon HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Women who take the epilepsy medication valproic acid during pregnancy have more than twice the risk of having a child with autism, new research suggests.

The study also found that taking the drug during pregnancy almost doubled the odds that a child would have attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), compared to children who weren’t exposed to the drug during pregnancy.

“These women are in a bind. Valproic acid is a first-line drug for epilepsy, and having uncontrolled epilepsy is also a risk to mom and baby. We’re not trying to point a finger at valproic acid, but we did see these associations,” said study author Kelsey Wiggs. She’s a doctoral candidate in the department of psychological and brain sciences at Indiana University in Bloomington.

Wiggs noted that the study wasn’t designed to prove cause-and-effect relationships, only associations.

She added that the study is important because of the associations it didn’t find, as well.

“We didn’t find an association with the antiseizure medications lamotrigine and carbamazepine,” Wiggs said.

Between three and seven women out of every 1,000 pregnant women have epilepsy — a seizure disorder. The main treatment for epilepsy is antiseizure medications, according to background information in the study. But valproic acid has been linked to a higher risk of birth defects and lower cognitive test scores (IQ and other tests), according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

The drug has also been associated with a higher risk of ADHD and autism in smaller studies, the researchers noted.

The latest study included nearly 15,000 children who were born to women with epilepsy between 1996 and 2011. Nearly one in four of the mothers took antiseizure medication during their first trimester of pregnancy.

About 10% of the women took carbamazepine and 7% took the medication lamotrigine. Five percent of the women took valproic acid (699 children).

Of those who were exposed to valproic acid in pregnancy, 36 developed autism by the age of 10. There were just over 11,000 kids who weren’t exposed to any antiseizure medication. Just 154 of them were diagnosed with autism.

Fifty-four of the kids exposed to valproic acid developed ADHD by 10. In those with no exposure to the drugs, 251 out of 11,000 were diagnosed with ADHD, the study authors said.

Wiggs said it’s not clear how valproic acid exposure might trigger autism or ADHD. She said that the medication is associated with the increased metabolism of the nutrient folate. Folate is important in the development of nervous system cells, so it’s possible that may play a role.

Dr. Steven Pacia, vice chair of neurology at North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset, N.Y., said that folate might be one factor, but he suspects there are likely multiple reasons why this medication is associated with higher rates of autism and ADHD.

Pacia said this study is the largest to link valproic acid to autism and ADHD, but that the drug was already known to

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Group sees 14% increase in child Covid-19 cases with close to 800,000 US kids infected

The group, which represents pediatricians, says about 792,188 children have been infected in the US as of October 22. According to Johns Hopkins University, more than 8.6 million Americans have been infected with the novel coronavirus.

The AAP said 94,555 new child cases were reported from October 8 to October 22.

Severe illness and deaths from Covid-19 are still rare among children. As of October 22, children represented between 1% and 3.6% of total hospitalizations, depending on the state. Between 0.6% and 6.9% of all child Covid-19 cases resulted in hospitalization and in states that reported the information, up to 0.15% of all children with Covid-19 died. Sixteen states reported no child deaths.

The AAP said it started collecting this data in the absence of regular releases of information from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The CDC provides a national number of cases by age in its data tracker, but the age data isn’t released on a regular schedule. The AAP reports on numbers of cases among children weekly.

With the CDC numbers it is also hard to know where the cases are coming from, as there are no geographic indicators provided with the CDC’s age data.

What you need to know about coronavirus on Monday, October 26

The AAP’s count is not totally complete, because not all states report data in the same way. The cases are likely undercounted, according to the organization. These numbers come from 49 states, New York City, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and Guam. A smaller subset of states report information about hospitalizations and deaths by age.

The AAP recommends that children wear masks, avoid large crowds and keep a healthy distance from others. It also suggests all children 6 months or older get a flu shot. Pediatricians say it’s even more important than ever to get a flu shot before the end of October.

With two respiratory diseases circulating at the same time –flu and coronavirus — will be confusing to doctors, parents and caregivers. Plus, hospitals and clinics could be overwhelmed with the double burden.

As another wave of the pandemic approaches, the nation's food banks are being hit on three fronts
The two viruses cause similar symptoms but a study published September in JAMA Network Open found that children hospitalized with Covid-19 were more likely to have fever, aches, diarrhea and vomiting than were children with the flu.
Children with Covid-19 also tended to be older and have at least one underlying health condition. Babies under a year old with certain underlying conditions such as asthma or diabetes may also be more likely to have severe illness from Covid-19.
Covid-19 and seasonal flu in children led to similar rates of hospitalization, intensive care admission, and need for a ventilator to help breathing, the study found. The CDC says 189 children died from flu over the 2019-2020 season.

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A child care emergency for working families

Three months ago, my wife and I became parents and joined the 41 million other Americans — one-third of the U.S. workforce –— who balance the demands of work and parenting. Anyone who has weathered the many late nights, early mornings  and diaper changes quickly learns three things: Parenting is hard. Being a working parent is even harder. And being a working parent during a pandemic is downright herculean.  

There is a child care emergency unfolding across the United States. Since the beginning of the pandemic, more than 741,000 children in the United States have tested positive for the coronavirus. As a result, some 40 percent of U.S. daycares have closed. 

Families have been left with few options. Without child care, parents are being forced to choose between work and their children’s development. In fact, women exited the workforce in August and September at four times the rate of men. 

This is not sustainable. Working families need help as the country appears to be entering a third wave of coronavirus infections, with hospitalizations rising in 37 states. Because of the federal government’s botched pandemic response, 4.5 million U.S. child care slots could be permanently lost. 

It’s clear we need new leadership and real action — not wishful thinking. As a former state government official who responded to emergencies, I see opportunities for change with three key solutions: 

First, provide more support to child care providers and facilities. The CARES Act provided $3.5 billion to child care providers, but this is woefully insufficient. According to industry experts, the need is closer to $96 billion. There is no more important investment than our children, and Congress must provide more support immediately.  

Also, since many of these providers operate as small businesses, an expanded second Paycheck Protection Program should specifically support child care facilities. Unfortunately, only 5 percent of child care facilities reportedly benefited from relief loans nationwide.  

Second, help child care facilities meet pandemic safety standards and expand availability. Before the pandemic, 43 percent of parents reported difficulty locating child care. Many faced long wait lists and many more struggled to find convenient, affordable care. With the pandemic shrinking child care availability and social distancing requirements limiting enrollment, we need to construct new facilities and renovate existing ones to ensure parents have access to care that meets new safety standards. 

To support and spur this development, we need a new child care construction tax credit of at least 50 percent for the first million dollars of construction costs to encourage all businesses to provide on-site child care at places of work. Minority-owned and smaller child care facilities should have access to grant funding for upgrades too. 

Third, pay, protect and support child care workers. Ninety percent of child care educators and caregivers are women. They work long, stressful hours and now, in the middle of a pandemic, are being asked to risk their health, and maybe even their lives, to care for our children for an average of $10

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When to take a child to the hospital for flu: Serious symptoms

Children with influenza, known as the flu, usually get better at home. However, when their symptoms are severe or last a long time, a child may need to go to the hospital for treatment.

Certain signs and symptoms indicate that medical treatment is necessary to avoid complications. Parents and caregivers should be aware of these so that they know to take prompt action when necessary.

In this article, we list the flu symptoms to watch out for in children. We also explain the typical timeline of flu symptoms and when to take a child to the hospital.

The flu is a respiratory illness. It occurs when an influenza virus infects the nose, throat, or, occasionally, the lungs. The symptoms of the flu in children are similar to those in adults. They include:

Some children may also experience vomiting or diarrhea.

Flu is not the same as the common cold. Some key differences between cold and flu symptoms can help a parent or caregiver identify which disease is affecting a child.

Usually, a fever and extreme tiredness accompany the flu. These symptoms are much more unusual in colds.

It is also important to note that the symptoms of the flu can be similar to those of COVID-19, which SARS-CoV-2 — the new coronavirus — causes. If there is a possibility that a child might have COVID-19, it is important to make sure that staff members are aware of this before arriving at a hospital or medical facility.

In most cases, parents or caregivers can treat a child with the flu at home. However, when the child has more severe symptoms or symptoms that persist for longer than normal, they may need to go to the hospital.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), if a child has the following symptoms, they require emergency medical treatment:

  • rapid breathing or difficulty breathing
  • blue tinge to the lips or face
  • ribs pulling in with each breath
  • chest pain
  • severe muscle pain
  • dehydration — signs in children include not urinating for 8 hours or more, having a dry mouth, or producing no tears when they cry
  • not alert
  • seizures
  • fever above 104°F (40°C)
  • in children less than 12 weeks of age, any fever, which is 100.4°F (38°C) or higher
  • fever or cough that worsens or improves and then comes back

This list is not exhaustive. If a parent or caregiver is concerned about any symptoms that do not appear on this list, they should still consult a medical professional.

If a child does require hospital treatment, doctors can use a range of treatments to help them recover from the flu. These include:

  • intravenous (IV) fluids to treat dehydration
  • antiviral medications to combat the flu virus
  • oxygen therapy, if a child is struggling to breathe

According to the CDC, since 2010, 7,000–26,000 children younger than 5 years of age have required hospitalization each year due to the flu.

Children are at risk of developing health complications from the flu. One study looking at

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Survey: Alabama child care enrollment down by 23,000 kids

Enrollment in child care centers across Alabama has dropped by more than 23,000 children since the coronavirus pandemic began even though most facilities have reopened, a new state report showed Wednesday.

While 85% of the 2,381 facilities surveyed by the Department of Human Resources have reopened since the initial lockdown period that forced businesses to close in March, centers are operating at only 66% of capacity compared to 88% in January, a news release said Wednesday.

Overall October enrollment in licensed centers, licensed family child care homes and exempt facilities was down by 23,241 kids, the agency said.

“The providers that have been able to reopen are providing a much-needed service to the people of Alabama. As the survey reveals, however, not all children have returned to their child care providers,” Human Resources Commissioner Nancy Buckner said.

The department didn’t say what was behind the decline, but Alabama’s unemployment rate is up from a year ago and many people are still working from home, possibly reducing the need for child care.

More than 2,800 people have died from COVID-19 in the state, which ranks 20th highest in the nation for fatalities on a per-person basis, and almost 175,000 have tested positive, according to researchers at Johns Hopkins University.

Health officials say key pandemic statistics are worsening in Alabama as cases also rise across much of the nation.

While most people who contract the coronavirus recover after suffering only mild to moderate symptoms, it can be deadly for older patients and those with other health problems.

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Follow AP coverage of the virus outbreak at https://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak.

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N.J.’s child care nightmare could actually get worse. Here’s why.

Smaller class sizes. Stockpiles of PPE. Expensive ventilation upgrades and exhaustive daily cleaning.

The cost to run a child care center will remain elevated as long as COVID-19 safety precautions remain in place, according to new research. And many child care centers face a painful choice: Hike your prices or shut your doors.

“Many child care providers were already struggling to turn a profit before the pandemic, so it shouldn’t surprise anyone if some are now forced to raise rates, turn children away, or close their doors,” said Karin Garver, early childhood education policy specialist for the National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) and the report’s author.

As the pandemic persists, child care centers across the state are falling into financial peril with limited recourse beyond raising prices for families, many of which have already felt the crushing weight of layoffs, furloughs and pay cuts. The NIEER report estimates pandemic health precautions — including lower state caps on class sizes — have increased child care provider costs by up to $69 a week per toddler and $37 a week per preschooler.

The best way to keep child care centers open without soaring prices for parents would be increasing state subsidy rates, said Steve Barnett, a senior co-director at NIEER, which operates at Rutgers University.

Currently, the New Jersey Child Care Subsidy Program pays centers up to $241 a week for infants, $201 a week for toddlers and $167 a week for preschoolers. NIEER’s report suggests per child subsidy rates must rise by up to $40 per week for infants and $63 per week for preschoolers to help child care centers break even.

“It simply will not be possible for most providers to offer the quality care infants and toddlers need to support learning and development without a substantive increase in reimbursement rates to cover higher costs in the pandemic,” Barnett said.

State Sen. Teresa Ruiz, D-Essex, said the state should consider raising those rates now before the child care landscape gets worse.

“If we do not act, closures around the state could cause the child care system to collapse once offices begin to reopen and demand increases as more people return to work,” Ruiz warned.

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Adam Clark may be reached at [email protected]

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The Mental Health of Families That Have a Child With a Disability: 10 Things That Make a Difference

There is a lot of information and activities designed to increase awareness and understanding of mental health issues and to reduce the stigma that often goes along with it.

What about the mental health of families that have a child with a disability?

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), mental health is defined as "a state of well-being in which every individual realizes his or her own potential, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to make a contribution to her or his community.

Your mental health is affected by numerous factors from your daily life, including the stress of balancing work with your health and relationships. " (Canadian Mental Health Association)

While most parents will say that their child has brought tremendous joy to their lives, it is no secret that the responsibility of having a child with a disability is way beyond the normal stresses of everyday life.

Over the years, I have had the privilege of speaking to many parents. Overwhelmed, exhausted, isolated, afraid, anxious, worried, sad, stressed, upset, angry, frustrated, drained, weakened and shattered are but a few emotions that parents say the experience each and every day.

There are options which provide families with a short break such home support and respite programs however the funding for these programs is relatively minimal compared to the number of hours that parents devote to the care of their child.

Lack of sleep, frequent visits to the doctor or hospital, interrupted careers, strained relationships, dropped friendships, and financial pressure are all examples of the constant and non-stop stress that a family goes through.

Not to mention the attitudinal barriers that families encounter in places at school, the playground, the hospital, the restaurant, the sports team and the list goes on.

Furthermore, parents are not very good at asking for help. In her book, Daring Greatly, Dr. Brené Brown states that "going it alone is a value we hold in high esteem in our culture." She also states that "For some reason we attach judgment to receiving help." I know that my husband and I were reluctant to receive help when it was initially offered and yet looking back, there was absolutely no way we could have done it without the support from our family, friends and funded assistance.

We are informed about the destructive effects on our health from sleep deprivation, chronic stress and secondary traumatic stress disorder as it relates to people on shift work and professional caregivers however we do not ever hear about the devastating effects on families that have a child with a disability.

The Mayo Clinic explains that the long-term effects of chronic stress can disrupt almost all your body's processes. This increases the risk of many health problems, including, anxiety, depression, digestive problems, headaches, heart disease, sleep problems, weight gain and memory and concentration impairment.

What can be done to preserve the mental health of families that have a child with a …

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