Onnit’s Chief Fitness Officer Discovered His ‘Non-Negotiables’ in 2020

This article originally appeared in the December 2020 issue of Men’s Health.



Onnit Chief Fitness Officer John Wolf shares some of the most important lessons he's learned while adjusting to the challenges that arose in 2020.


© Kyle Hilton
Onnit Chief Fitness Officer John Wolf shares some of the most important lessons he’s learned while adjusting to the challenges that arose in 2020.

JOHN WOLF’S job is all about thinking in new ways to break away from conventions—but 2020 was still an unprecedented challenge for him.

The man tasked with leading the fitness curriculum at Onnit, the company behind some of the most unconventional, versatile workout gear on the market, had to adjust the ways he approaches both his work and family.

He wound up building stronger connections than ever before.

Now, in his own words, Wolf shares the lessons he’s learned through a period that was challenging and isolating—but which ultimately led to deeper connections and a renewed sense of focus.



background pattern: breaker


© .
breaker

I think fitness is taking on a little more of a mental-emotional aspect during this pandemic. It is a thing that people have doubled down on in a variety of different ways, but it looks and feels so much different than it did before.

The availability of the equipment is a big issue these days. It’s forced kind of a Spartan and minimalist mindset, like, ‘How creative do I have to be to get the job done?’

Some of the coaching I’ve gone through for personal improvement is what I lean on in this larger group environment because it’s not like everybody looks the same. Not everybody has the same interests—except for everybody feels that they’re alone, to some degree, that their circumstances are uniquely theirs … Then through breaking down the barriers in the group, and me also being vulnerable to my experiences live and being forthright with them about those things, hoping that we’re facilitating an environment where people realize okay, the circumstances might all be really different, but the subjective experience that we’re all having is very consistent as human beings.



logo: Click here to join for more exclusive health and fitness stories.


© .
Click here to join for more exclusive health and fitness stories.

In this day and age, right now, the sense of feeling seen and feeling heard—to feel validated on some platform in some way—takes on a greater meaning and grander meaning than it ever has before… That’s really the biggest message, you show up here and you are seen and you are heard, and that even just that the act of showing up is enough to participate.

If it’s a nice day, we create a space where we can go for an hour-long walk as a pack. Walking together creates either quiet time, being around each other, being okay being quiet, and/or the perfect storm, the perfect opportunity to be able to converse about things that matter and observe the world around us at a tempo where there’s actually time to see something. You drive down the same street, you don’t see the detail on that flower. You might not even notice that those flowers bloomed between yesterday and today.

If you’re

Read more

BJP State Chief Dilip Ghosh

Home  » 
Website  » 
National

 » 
TMC Will Get A Taste Of Its Own Medicine: BJP State Chief Dilip Ghosh



TMC Will Get A Taste Of Its Own Medicine: BJP State Chief Dilip Ghosh



outlookindia.com

2020-11-30T16:53:41+05:30

BJP state unit president Dilip Ghosh Monday hit back at TMC MP Abhishek Banerjee for calling him a ‘goonda’ and said the saffron party believed in standing by the people and the ruling side will get the “taste of its own medicine”.

If being on the side of the people is being a goonda then BJP will continue to do so in “greater measure”, Ghosh said.

Banerjee, nephew of TMC supremo Mamata Banerjee, had told a rally in South 24 Pargans district on Sunday that BJP’s Bengal minder Kailash Vijayvargiya is an “outsider” and Ghosh was a “goonda” .

“Abhishek has seen nothing of goondaism so far. We (BJP) will do it in greater measure. They (TMC) will get the taste of their own medicine.

“However, we believe in standing by the side of people. This may be interpreted as goondaism by the TMC as they have lost contact with the people,” he said.

Banerjee, who is the nephew of Chief Minister and Trinamool Congress supremo Mamata Banerjee, had also said at Sunday’s rally in South 24 Parganas district that no BJP leader, including Prime Minister Narendra Modi, had the “guts” to take his name and “use innuendos like ‘bhaipo’ (nephew in Bengali) or ‘bhatija’ (meaning the same)” to level charges against him.

Commenting on this, Ghosh mocked at Banerjee as “khokababu (young scion of affluent family) who got things on a platter”.

“We (BJP) used to call him ‘bhaipo’ out of love. But now I am branding him as khokababu who has come to politics without hard work. People are watching everything,” he said.

Reacting to Ghosh’s comments, veteran TMC MP Saugata Roy said “Dilipbabu makes irresponsible comments in the morning hours before the media regularly. There is no merit in his statements.”


For in-depth, objective and more importantly balanced journalism, Click here to subscribe to Outlook Magazine


Source Article

Read more

United Family Medicine Board Names Chief Executive Officer

ST. PAUL, Minn.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–United Family Medicine (UFM), a federally-qualified health center (FQHC) in St. Paul dedicated to meeting the health care demands of its community while contributing to the vitality of the region, announced today that its board of directors promoted Ann Nyakundi to CEO effective immediately.

Nyakundi joined the organization as interim CEO in October 2019, establishing priorities to re-design UFM’s care model to improve patients’ access to its services, maintain highest level health outcomes, and achieve compliance with the Health Resources Services Administration (HRSA), its federal regulator and primary funder. The resulting transformative changes, including migrating from its Allina-leased provider arrangement to hiring its own full complement of physicians, place UFM on track to attain regulatory compliance, while improving patients’ ability to see their doctors and health care team more quickly than ever before.

“It’s my desire and our collective responsibility to provide the best health care possible to every one of our patients, at the time that they need it, and we’re making numerous changes to meet this commitment,” said Nyakundi. “I’m grateful to UFM’s board of directors for the confidence it’s placed in me as its CEO, and excited to continue our work to place patients at the center of our response to community needs.”

Through the onset and continuing stressors of the Covid-19 pandemic, Nyakundi empowered her teams to improve access to care, such as the advanced practitioners who launched telemedicine as a service. This prompt response resulted in UFM regaining most of the patient visits that were delayed due to the pandemic, while significantly reducing UFM’s operating deficit and reliance on a part-time physician workforce. These cost efficiencies will allow UFM to expand dental and other services.

“Ann’s skill as a health care leader and her ethical and motivational orientation has steered United Family Medicine forward through the extreme challenges that its operating structure posed and the Covid-19 pandemic continues to present,” said Daymond Dean, UFM Executive Committee Board Member. “Our patients’ lives and well-being depend on their ability to receive the services that a community health center provides, and Ann is immeasurably qualified to ensure that UFM delivers those services and high-quality health care to our community.

Nyakundi pursued undergraduate and graduate medical anthropology and health care administration at the University of Michigan and University of Minnesota respectively, and brings to her role expertise in community health, philanthropy, strategic planning and health policy. Having experienced homelessness as a child without access to adequate options for high quality health care, inspired her career and commitment to public health. Most recently she volunteered for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) as a National Expert for the New Models of Primary Care Workforce and Financing Project, provided strategic support to the National Marrow Donor Program and worked within the Primary Care Services Division of the American Cancer Society.

About United Family Medicine

United Family Medicine, a federally qualified health center in St. Paul, Minnesota, provides high quality primary care, dental services and

Read more

United Family Medicine Board Names Chief Executive Officer – Press Release

ST. PAUL, Minn.–(Business Wire)–United Family Medicine (UFM), a federally-qualified health center (FQHC) in St. Paul dedicated to meeting the health care demands of its community while contributing to the vitality of the region, announced today that its board of directors promoted Ann Nyakundi to CEO effective immediately.

Nyakundi joined the organization as interim CEO in October 2019, establishing priorities to re-design UFM’s care model to improve patients’ access to its services, maintain highest level health outcomes, and achieve compliance with the Health Resources Services Administration (HRSA), its federal regulator and primary funder. The resulting transformative changes, including migrating from its Allina-leased provider arrangement to hiring its own full complement of physicians, place UFM on track to attain regulatory compliance, while improving patients’ ability to see their doctors and health care team more quickly than ever before.

“It’s my desire and our collective responsibility to provide the best health care possible to every one of our patients, at the time that they need it, and we’re making numerous changes to meet this commitment,” said Nyakundi. “I’m grateful to UFM’s board of directors for the confidence it’s placed in me as its CEO, and excited to continue our work to place patients at the center of our response to community needs.”

Through the onset and continuing stressors of the Covid-19 pandemic, Nyakundi empowered her teams to improve access to care, such as the advanced practitioners who launched telemedicine as a service. This prompt response resulted in UFM regaining most of the patient visits that were delayed due to the pandemic, while significantly reducing UFM’s operating deficit and reliance on a part-time physician workforce. These cost efficiencies will allow UFM to expand dental and other services.

“Ann’s skill as a health care leader and her ethical and motivational orientation has steered United Family Medicine forward through the extreme challenges that its operating structure posed and the Covid-19 pandemic continues to present,” said Daymond Dean, UFM Executive Committee Board Member. “Our patients’ lives and well-being depend on their ability to receive the services that a community health center provides, and Ann is immeasurably qualified to ensure that UFM delivers those services and high-quality health care to our community.

Nyakundi pursued undergraduate and graduate medical anthropology and health care administration at the University of Michigan and University of Minnesota respectively, and brings to her role expertise in community health, philanthropy, strategic planning and health policy. Having experienced homelessness as a child without access to adequate options for high quality health care, inspired her career and commitment to public health. Most recently she volunteered for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) as a National Expert for the New Models of Primary Care Workforce and Financing Project, provided strategic support to the National Marrow Donor Program and worked within the Primary Care Services Division of the American Cancer Society.

About United Family Medicine

United Family Medicine, a federally qualified health center in St. Paul, Minnesota, provides high quality primary care, dental services and behavioral health

Read more

Spring Hills Names Dr. Pierantonio Russo as Chief Medical Officer and Chief Clinical Transformation Officer

Veteran Cardiac Surgeon, Heart Transplant Surgeon and Health Care Executive to Lead Expansion of Organization’s Population Health Management Program

Spring Hills announced today that it has named Pierantonio Russo, MD, Chief Medical Officer and Chief Clinical Transformation Officer of the Population Health Management Program. Russo will oversee the integration of Population Health into Spring Hills’ clinical programs and offer guidance to providers, payers, and policymakers on IT and AI enabled comprehensive population management, including complex care for high-risk, high cost, high needs patients.

Following two decades of practicing cardiac and heart transplant surgery, first at the Mayo Clinic, Russo assumed executive leadership roles providing expertise in medical informatics, machine learning (ML) and predictive modeling applications in health care, value-based insurance and outcome-based contracts, and population medicine. Prior to joining Spring Hills, Russo served as the Chief Medical Officer of HVH/Eversana, a leading provider of artificial intelligence (AI) and ML for health care applications and global commercial services to the life sciences industry. Among other projects, Russo led an initiative with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on early predictors and medical cost of several rare diseases.

In 2016-17, Russo served as Vice President of Health Services at Boston-based Harvard Pilgrim Health Care and Insurance Council Chair and board member of the Massachusetts Health Care Quality Partners. He supported the creation of a framework for utilization, quality management and reimbursement that facilitated the launch of the virtual hospital or hospital-at-home program, Medicallyhome. From 2007-2016, Russo was Medical Director at Independence Blue Cross in Philadelphia, where he leveraged predictive algorithms codesigned with the data science team to implement disease management and telemedicine initiatives for patients with heart failure.

“Dr. Russo is a clinician with a notable track record of driving new innovation to improve patient care and outcomes,” said Alex Markowits, Founder and President/CEO of Spring Hills. “He is keenly aware of the numerous factors that can impact a person’s health and has created programs over the past decade to close critical gaps in communication and care. His background and expertise make him an ideal fit to lead the growth of our population health management program. With his experience in cardiology, Dr. Russo also will be a key asset to our specialized cardiac program for people transitioning from hospital to home after a cardiac event.”

Spring Hills operates Post-Acute Care, Assisted Living, and Memory Care communities and Home Care services for seniors and those with chronic health needs. The company is expanding to include clinical programs that will offer residents and patients uniquely comprehensive health care. Population Health Management is fully integrated into the clinical programs, including the recently established Cardiac Program.

Spring Hills Population Health associates build relationships with the patient and family while in the hospital to ensure a smooth transition to Spring Hills and provide support during their stay and for 90 days post-discharge. Services include care coordination, personal communication, follow-up appointments, home visits, remote monitoring and removing social or financial barriers to care. Through Population Health

Read more

Mission Therapeutics Appoints Dr Suhail Nurbhai as Chief Medical Officer

Mission Therapeutics (“Mission”), a drug discovery and development company focused on selectively inhibiting deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs), has appointed Dr Suhail Nurbhai as Chief Medical Officer (CMO) with immediate effect.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201102005064/en/

Dr Suhail Nurbhai. High-resolution images available on request. (Photo: Business Wire)

Dr Nurbhai has more than 25 years of experience and a strong track record in the strategic and operational leadership of all phases of clinical research and development at companies across Europe and the US. He joins Mission from VHsquared, where he held the position of CMO since 2014.

Prior to VHsquared, Suhail was Senior Vice President and Head of Development and Medical Affairs for Shionogi in Europe. He joined Shionogi from Takeda where he was Vice President and Head of Clinical and Analytical Science in Europe, with responsibility for all Clinical Science activities in Neurosciences, Cardiovascular/Renal/Metabolic, Oncology, Gastrointestinal/Genitourinary and Respiratory Medicine, as well as Clinical Pharmacology, Medical Writing, Statistics and Data Management.

Suhail’s initial industry experience was at Pfizer, where he spent 12 years, initially in Sandwich, UK and then at Global R&D Headquarters in Connecticut, USA. During his time at Pfizer he held roles of increasing responsibility across multiple therapeutic areas including GI/GU, anti-bacterial, sexual medicine and anti-fungal, prior to completing his time at Pfizer as Head of Neuroscience Clinical R&D at the Groton site in Connecticut.

During his career he has led teams bringing multiple compounds from pre-clinical phase into clinical studies in both Europe and US, and achieved multiple successful NDA and MAA submissions and approvals.

Suhail qualified in Medicine at Dundee University in Scotland and completed his post-graduate medical training at Hope Hospital in the University of Manchester.

Commenting on the appointment, Dr Anker Lundemose, CEO of Mission Therapeutics said: “We are pleased to be welcoming Suhail to further strengthen Mission’s leadership team. His in-depth knowledge and proven track record in clinical research will be invaluable as we work to bring our first-in-class USP30 inhibitor compound into the clinic. Suhail’s appointment is the last of a series of organisational changes, including the promotions of Dr Paul Thompson and Dr Nick Edmunds, to ready the Company for this next phase.”

Dr Suhail Nurbhai added: “It’s great to be joining Mission at such an exciting time for the Company. The ongoing collaboration with AbbVie and recently signed agreement with Pfizer represent solid industry validation of the Company’s approach and ground-breaking technology. I look forward to building on this success progressing its lead assets into the clinic.”

– ENDS –

NOTES TO EDITORS:

About Mission Therapeutics

Mission Therapeutics is an early-stage drug development company targeting the ubiquitin pathway for the treatment of kidney disease, neurodegenerative disease, rare mitochondrial diseases and fibrosis. The Company has built a leading platform for the discovery and development of first-in-class, small molecule drugs that selectively target deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs) – an emerging drug class that is attracting significant commercial interest in the area of protein homeostasis.

Mission has strong

Read more

WHO chief self-quarantining after contact with person who tested positive for coronavirus

The World Health Organization Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus announced late Sunday he was self-quarantining after coming into contact with someone who tested positive for the novel coronavirus.

“I have been identified as a contact of someone who has tested positive for #COVID19,” Tedros wrote on Twitter. “I am well and without symptoms but will self-quarantine over the coming days, in line with @WHO protocols, and work from home.”

The announcement comes as the coronavirus has totaled at least 46,426,677 worldwide cases and more than 1,199,684 deaths, as of Sunday night, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. 

4 CORONAVIRUS TREATMENTS, INCLUDING REMDESIVIR, HYDROXYCHLOROQUINE, FLOP IN LARGE WHO STUDY

Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of the World Health Organization (WHO), addresses a press conference about the update on COVID-19 at the World Health Organization headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland on Feb. 24, 2020. (Salvatore Di Nolfi/Keystone via AP, File)

Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of the World Health Organization (WHO), addresses a press conference about the update on COVID-19 at the World Health Organization headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland on Feb. 24, 2020. (Salvatore Di Nolfi/Keystone via AP, File)

Tedros is currently in Geneva, which is home to WHO headquarters, according to his Twitter bio. On Sunday, the city announced a partial lockdown, following an outbreak of cases and hospitalizations due to the virus.

“On November 1, 474 people are being treated by the University Hospitals of Geneva (HUG), including 56 in intensive care beds (intensive and intermediate care). As a reminder, in mid-October, the HUG had 78 hospitalizations, including 13 in intensive care beds,” a statement by the cantonal government said.

“The figures show that the situation is severely worsening. Over the past few days, more than 1,000 people have tested positive for coronavirus on a daily basis,” the statement continued.

According to WHO guidelines cited by Tedros, the agency “recommends that all contacts of individuals with a confirmed or probable COVID-19 be quarantined in a designated facility or at home for 14 days from their last exposure.”

HEALTHY YOUNG PEOPLE MAY WAIT FOR CORONAVIRUS VACCINE UNTIL 2022, WHO OFFICIAL SAYS

On Sunday, he wrote that it was “critically important that we all comply with health guidance.”

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

“This is how we will break chains of #COVID19 transmission, suppress the virus, and protect health systems,” Tedros added. “My @WHO colleagues and I will continue to engage with partners in solidarity to save lives and protect the vulnerable. Together!”

Source Article

Read more

N.J.’s medical marijuana chief douses senator’s pipe dream of legal weed for sale immediately after the election

EDITOR’S NOTE: NJ Cannabis Insider produces exclusive weekly content and monthly events geared toward those interested in the marijuana and hemp industries. To subscribe, visit njcannabisinsider.biz.

Not long after state Sen. Nick Scutari claimed on Tuesday legislators and regulators may “be able to flip the switch and people might be able to get marijuana, legally, right after the vote,” the head of the state medical cannabis program doused that pipe dream with a bucket of cold water.

“(Some dispensaries) literally do not even have the space to accommodate the level of demand that personal-use sales would bring,” said Jeff Brown, who helms the Department of Health’s Medicinal Marijuana Program. “I could say unequivocally that opening up sales even a few months after the election would be a disaster and would really hurt access for patients who need this as medicine. My number one priority is to ensure that the patients have access — that’s going to be our priority first and foremost.”

Since the passage of Jake Honig’s Law, the medical program continues to grow in terms of patients and demand — about 7,000 patients per month on average and nearly 95,000 patients enrolled in total — but the program continues to face supply challenges for just the current patient population due to the small number of operational cultivators and canopy space.

Scutari, in his comments during an interview with NJ Cannabis Insider streamed live on NJ.com’s Facebook page Tuesday, that “(the) currently operating medical cannabis dispensaries would have an opportunity to sell to the general public for people over 21, if they can certify that they have enough product to satisfy their patients that they’re already treating.”

Brown, who also participated in a closed portion of the webinar, tamped down the senator’s suggestion at the time. He said he wants to keep an open dialogue with legislators and make the program’s priorities clear to medical patients and Garden State citizens as a whole.

“Inventories at alternative treatment centers are increasing, too, but it’s uneven,” he said. “We have some that are expanding capacity and then we have others that are simply maintaining and have really no room to expand cultivation in their current footprints.”

For the past six months, Brown said, the medical cannabis program has averaged about only 2,100 pounds in sales per month, rising to nearly 2,500 in September with a similar trend in October. Based on an average of the patient population, patients typically only buy a half-ounce each month, he said.

As of this past Friday, Brown said, there were about 10,000 pounds of medical cannabis in the market — about evenly split between flower and extracts, though flower tends to have higher sales. That means there’s enough medical cannabis to last about four months, given current sales trends and more limited choices for patients.

Part of the challenges dispensaries face, Brown said, is the small indoor canopy. There’s a dozen cultivators in New Jersey, but the average dispensary only has a canopy of

Read more

Space Force vice chief of space operations tests positive for COVID-19

Lt. Gen. David D. Thompson, Vice Commander of the United States Space Force, seen at the Air Force Association, Air Warfare Symposium in Orlando, Fla., in February, tested positive for COVID-19 this week. Photo by Jonathan Snyder/U.S. Air Force

Lt. Gen. David D. Thompson, Vice Commander of the United States Space Force, seen at the Air Force Association, Air Warfare Symposium in Orlando, Fla., in February, tested positive for COVID-19 this week. Photo by Jonathan Snyder/U.S. Air Force

Oct. 29 (UPI) — Space Force’s vice chief of space operations tested positive for COVID-19 Wednesday, Space Force announced.

According to a press release issued jointly by the Space Force and the Air Force, Gen. David D. Thompson took a test for the virus after learning that a close family member had tested positive.

Air Force spokeswoman Ann Stefanek said Thompson has not shown symptoms of COVID-19 so far and was on leave last week, but returned to the Pentagon for work on Monday and Tuesday to address a virtual symposium for the National Defense Industrial Association and Texas A&M University.

He is now self-isolating and working from home.

According to Stefanek, Chief of Space Operations Gen. John W. “Jay” Raymond, Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Charles Q. Brown, Jr., and Air Force Secretary Barbara M. Barrett have not tested positive for the new virus within the past 24 hours.

Raymond and Brown recently ended a period of isolation after a potential exposure among the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

“The Department of the Air Force continues to follow established DoD and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention policies and guidelines for COVID. Measures include temperature testing, social distancing to the greatest extent possible, the wearing of masks when social distancing is not possible, and contact tracing and quarantining, if needed,” the press release said.

As of Thursday morning a total of 55,443 COVID-19 cases had been reported in the military since the beginning of the pandemic, with 8,839 of those reported among Air Force personnel.

Earlier this month Marine Corps assistant commandant Gen. Gary Thomas and Adm. Charles Ray, vice commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard, tested positive for COVID-19.

And last week United States Forces Korea said 13 service members had tested positive for the virus, the second time in two weeks that USFK reported personnel arriving in Korea had tested positive.

Source Article

Read more

Providence Names Sylvain Trepanier as Chief Nursing Officer

Providence Names Sylvain Trepanier as Chief Nursing Officer

PR Newswire

RENTON, Wash., Oct. 29, 2020

RENTON, Wash., Oct. 29, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Providence, one of the largest health systems in the country, today announced that Sylvain “Syl” Trepanier, D.N.P., R.N., will serve as the organization’s new system-wide chief nursing officer (CNO), effective January 1, 2021.

Sylvain “Syl” Trepanier, D.N.P., R.N., will serve as the organization’s new system-wide chief nursing officer (CNO), effective January 1, 2021
Sylvain “Syl” Trepanier, D.N.P., R.N., will serve as the organization’s new system-wide chief nursing officer (CNO), effective January 1, 2021

As the new CNO, Syl will be a critical voice for nursing at the senior executive level, advocating for nurses and advanced practitioners while supporting the practice of nursing across the health system’s seven-state footprint. He will play a meaningful role in setting the system’s clinical strategy and will be at the center of workforce planning. One of Syl’s earliest responsibilities will be continuing to build momentum for Providence’s Nursing Institute and Clinical Academy, programs that provide a sustained talent pipeline of specialty nurses, nurse practitioners and clinicians.

“The CNO serves as a champion for our nurses and the invaluable role they play caring for the people in our communities, as well as ensuring we are attracting and retaining the most skilled and compassionate nurses. I know Syl will do both,” said executive vice president and chief clinical officer, Amy Compton-Phillips, M.D., to whom he will report. “With 30,000 nurses, we have a unique opportunity to show how nurses are at the heart of our mission and helping achieve our vision of health for a better world.”

Syl is currently serving as the chief clinical executive for Providence’s Southern California region. His work reduced clinical variation across the region, making Providence Southern California one of the safest places to receive care. Additionally, Syl helped lead the COVID-19 response. “Our region’s COVID-19 response demonstrates how the sharing of expertise across our system results in top-quality care, innovation and increased collaboration. I am excited to continue this work with my nursing colleagues across the Providence family of organizations,” said Syl.  

Syl will follow Deb Burton, Ph.D., R.N., who will retire at the end of 2020 after serving 12 years as the CNO for Providence. Under Deb’s leadership, Providence’s successful nursing workforce development programs have gained national recognition. The Clinical Academy, a year-long program designed to launch the careers of new graduate nurses into 22 different clinical specialties, resulted in a reduction in first-year nursing turnover from 25% to roughly 9% today. Deb also led efforts to grow distance-based academic nursing and clinical programs through the University of Providence.

Prior to joining Providence Southern California in 2017, Syl served as system vice president and chief nursing officer for Premier Health in Dayton, Ohio. He also held leadership roles at Tenet in Dallas and at hospitals in South Florida. He has a doctorate in nursing from Texas Tech University, a Master of Science in Nursing, and a Bachelor of Science in Nursing from the University of Montreal.

Read more