Trudeau challenges Trump’s claim that vaccine will be available ‘in weeks’, announces $214M for Canadian vaccine development

For more on today’s top stories and the spread of the novel coronavirus across the country, please refer to our live updates below throughout the day, as well as our COVID-19 news hub.

Trudeau says COVID-19 vaccine won’t come before the new year

At a press conference on Friday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau responded to U.S. President’s Donald Trump’s claim that a viable COVID-19 vaccine could be available in a matter of “weeks,” if not by the end of the year.

“We are hopeful that the vaccines will arrive yesterday, but they won’t,” Trudeau said. “There’s still a number more months of work to do.”

“Reasonable expectation is that vaccines could start to arrive sometime in the new year but even then, there will be smaller amounts of doses that will have to be distributed to priority populations, I think of most vulnerable or our frontline workers.”

The prime minister also said Canada has “an excellent portfolio of vaccine potentials” but stressed that “nobody’s got a vaccine yet.”

“There are still trials going on, there are still a number of companies, some closer than others, but we are waiting to ensure that those vaccines are effective and further, that they will be safe for Canadians,’ Trudeau said. “Nothing will be distributed in Canada until Health Canada is absolutely certain that the safety of Canadians is being properly covered and taken care of.” 

PM looking at Alberta travel pilot project to guide loosening border restriction

The prime minister also commented on yesterday’s announcement that Alberta will begin a pilot project in November, allowing travellers to be tested for COVID-19 upon returning to the province to reduce the required self-isolation time

“We’re interested in seeing the result of this pilot project, but it is only a pilot project,” Trudeau said. “As we move forward into the coming months and perhaps look at loosening some of the border restrictions internationally, we will be able to have data to rely on to make sure that we are first and foremost, keeping Canadian’s safe and controlling the spread of the virus.”

‘This is serious’

When speaking more generally about the COVID-19 situation in Canada, the prime minister stressed to Canadians that the daily case numbers in the country need to be reduced, as Canada saw its highest single-day increase on Thursday, totalling 2,786 cases.

“We have to get these numbers down, this is serious and everybody must do their part,” Trudeau said. “People’s lives are at stake, we can’t afford to be careless or think that this virus will just go away on its own.”

Dr. Theresa Tam, Canada’s chief public health officer, spoke specifically about the increases in outbreaks in long-term care facilities in Canada, including Ontario and Quebec.

“The size of the outbreaks are smaller than in the initial wave,” Dr. Tam identified. “I’m not sure exactly what that means, that could be people are identifying things more rapidly and putting in control measures, and the prevention is better, but

Read more

Watch Gymnasts Try Challenges From U.S. and British Military Fitness Tests

British Olympic gymnast Nile Wilson is taking a challenge that YouTubers and athletes alike love to try: military physical fitness tests. There’s an entire genre of fit guys testing their mettle with the physical trials members of the forces must pass—from British bodybuilder Obi Vincent trying the Marine Corps Fitness Test, MattDoesFitness attempting the U.S. Air Force’s Physical Fitness Test, and Olympic runners Nick Symmonds and Ryan Hall taking on the Marine Corps Fitness Test.



a man jumping in the air: British Olympic gymnast Nile Wilson tries out moves from military fitness tests in a gymnasium, including pullups, situps, pushups, and an assault course.


© Nile Wilson – YouTube
British Olympic gymnast Nile Wilson tries out moves from military fitness tests in a gymnasium, including pullups, situps, pushups, and an assault course.



logo: Click here to join for more premium fitness content.


© .
Click here to join for more premium fitness content.

But Wilson isn’t interested in one specific military outfit’s protocol. For his challenge, Wilson plans to take on a custom challenge comprised of pullups, pushups and situps, all common events in the genre. To fit the theme, Wilson and his friends don faux-camouflage fatigues and wear dog tags (the face paint they apply might just be a step to far).

Wilson sets out a goal number of reps for each exercise:

Chinups: 23

Situps: 70

Pushups: 40

“We’ll see how far we can push the boundaries today,” says Wilson.

Wilson gets to his chinups, and he knocks out 25 reps without dropping.

Next up is situps, which he plans to do for 2 minutes. But he comes up short with only 66.

“Ahhhhh!” he says as he struggles through his last reps. “We’re putting ourselves through hell and high water.”

Finally, he hits the pushups, which will be until he fatigues.

“I’ll be really happy with 87,” he says.

He grabs a yoga block to put under his chest to tap for each rep. He gets to it, and he manages to get to 61 pushups before collapsing. He’s not close to his goal, but it’s a solid effort nonetheless.

In place of the 1.5 mile run standard with military fitness tests, Wilson decides to do an assault course in the gymnasium instead. The challenge uses the gymnastics rings, crawling underneath gym mats, scaling a wall, flips on a trampoline, walking across balance beams, and uneven bars. He completes it in 1:25. That might be more like a military obstacle course than a fitness test—but we’ll give him credit for the effort.

Try 200+ at home workout videos from Men’s Health, Women’s Health, Prevention, and more on All Out Studio free for 14 days!

Continue Reading

Source Article

Read more

Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine Launches ‘Support Our Schools’ to Meet COVID-19 Challenges

Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine Launches ‘Support Our Schools’ to Meet COVID-19 Challenges

PR Newswire

NUTLEY, N.J., Oct. 19, 2020

School’s Human Dimension Program will complement health network’s ‘Reopening America’ Program

NUTLEY, N.J., Oct. 19, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine is pleased to announce a new program to assist schools in getting their academic year started more effectively, amid the challenges of COVID-19.

Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine (PRNewsfoto/Hackensack Meridian Health)
Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine (PRNewsfoto/Hackensack Meridian Health)

In June, Hackensack Meridian Health launched the Reopening America: Hackensack Meridian Health‘s Assist Program, which helps business owners and schools navigate the COVID-19 crisis and create a safe work environment for employees, customers and students. The program is tailored to meet the needs of any organization by offering three tiers of solutions that can fit any type, size and scale of business. These tiers include a hotline resource, weekly newsletter, on-site visits, and policy reviews and endorsement, among other benefits.

Hackensack Meridian Health and the Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine understand the many challenges that school districts are facing amidst the COVID-19 pandemic. This is why HMH has added on a new component to the “Reopening America: Hackensack Meridian Health’s Assist Program” called COVID SOS (Support Our Schools), an initiative developed by the Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine, as part of their Human Dimension Course Curriculum.

The new COVID SOS (Support Our Schools) initiative aims to provide expertise about opening, and opening safely, to select school districts in underserved communities that had previously partnered with the Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine’s innovative Human Dimension program.

“The Human Dimension program allows our medical students to provide benefits to the individuals, families, and communities with whom they are partnering,” said Bonita Stanton, founding dean of the Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine. “Even during a pandemic, learning must go on. By helping school districts get their classes up and running, our medical students are also learning valuable lessons themselves.”

“Our goal has always been to partner with communities and provide help wherever it is needed. This is a vital way we can help the most vulnerable in these uncertain times,” said Carmela Rocchetti, M.D., director of the Human Dimension. “Re-starting local education effectively and safely in these communities is crucial to recovery efforts.”

Each of the schools will be paired with a Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine Support Our Schools Task Force which will consist of eight medical students supervised by one of the school’s faculty physicians. Each Task Force will be trained in the latest in COVID-19 research and developments. The members of each task force will meet with school leadership approximately once a month. In addition to a personalized task force, school districts will have access to the Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine Faculty COVID Advisory Board which will host weekly Q & A sessions in order to provide real time support, as well as weekly scientific updates, and a dedicated phone line to maintain contact and updates.

The services provided

Read more