Lawsuit claims video shows Bishop’s Falls guards assaulting unconscious inmate in dentist’s chair | Canada | News

An inmate at a central Newfoundland prison is filing multiple lawsuits, including against corrections officers and a Gander oral surgeon, following an incident that reportedly happened at the surgeon’s office.

The Telegram has learned the man — an inmate at Bishops Falls Corrections Centre whose name is not being made public yet — alleges he was medically sedated at the oral surgeon’s office last month, when a corrections officer was video-recorded performing a dental procedure on him.

The video is believed to have been taken by another corrections officer, while two dental assistants were in the room at one point of the procedure.

The two corrections officers, who took the inmate to the oral surgeon’s office for an undisclosed procedure, were recently escorted out of the Bishop’s Falls facility by RCMP officers, a source told The Telegram earlier this week.

On Tuesday, both the RCMP and the Justice Department turned down requests for comment.

“My first reaction was shock and disbelief. With all due respect to my client. I thought it was incomprehensible and thought maybe he misapprehended what had happened.”

However, when contacted by The Telegram Wednesday, St. John’s lawyer Bob Buckingham confirmed he has been retained to represent the inmate and will file the lawsuit “fairly quickly” on his behalf.

“I haven’t heard of this happening in recent times in Newfoundland,” Buckingham said.

He said the lawsuits will claim battery, assault and breach of trust against the corrections officers; professional negligence and a breach of contract against the oral surgeon and the oral surgeon’s office; breach of trust by the corrections services and the provincial government, as well as vicarious liability against the provincial government, as it is alleged to have happened while corrections officers were on duty.

Buckingham said his client was unconscious at the time of the alleged incident, having been medically sedated, and had no knowledge of what happened when he left the dentist’s office a short time later. He said he learned about it and the video later from corrections administration.

“He understands one of the corrections officers took a video of this, which made the rounds within corrections services,” said Buckingham, adding that both the corrections administration and the RCMP are in possession of the video.

Buckingham said he was appalled to hear what the inmate says happened to him.

“My first reaction was shock and disbelief,” he said. “With all due respect to my client, I thought it was incomprehensible and thought maybe he misapprehended what had happened.

“It’s a very difficult set of circumstances to believe, given a professional involving a dentist and corrections officers who were there for his protection, and the inmate being under medically induced sedation.

“But types of egregious breaches of trust do happen in our province,” added Buckingham, who also represents the family of Jonathan Henoche, an inmate who was killed in segregation at Her Majesty’s Penitentiary in November 2019, in lawsuits against the corrections officers, the prison and the provincial government.

He said

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Yale Medicine Board elects new female chair, four new members

Jessie Cheung, Contributing Photographer

The Yale Medicine Board has elected a new female chair and has nominated and ratified four other female faculty members.

Nita Ahuja, the current chair of the surgery department at the Yale School of Medicine and an assistant director at the Yale Cancer Center, was elected as the new chair of the board in October. The four other women appointed to the board were Michele Johnson, Marie Robert, Marietta Vazquez and Merceditas Villanueva. The appointment of these five new members increased the gender and racial equity of the 27-member board.

“A board governing practice should have racial and gender composition matching the members of the clinical practice they represent,” Margaret Bia — professor emerita of medicine and a member of the Committee on the Status of Women in Medicine, or SWIM — wrote in an email News. SWIM aims to address issues related to gender equality at the Yale School of Medicine.

According to Bia, the Yale Medicine Board, which represents Yale Medicine, has had a problem with diversity in the past. She mentioned that Paula Kavathas — professor of laboratory medicine, immunobiology and molecular, cellular and developmental biology — noticed this issue a few years ago while she was serving on the board and resolved to fix it.

As stated by Kavathas, the board is composed of 18 clinical chiefs, which were almost exclusively men, and nine ad hoc chairs. When she was a member of the board, only three of the clinical chiefs and one of the ad hoc chairs were female.

“At the time, the Yale Medicine group was about 40 percent female,” Kavathas said. “But when I looked at the [board] structure, they were more than 90 percent male.”

In an effort to change the board’s composition, Kavathas emailed all the women faculty in the clinical departments to ask them if they would like to serve on the board as an ad hoc member. She then recommended the candidates to Paul Taheri, the chief executive officer of Yale Medicine, and Roberta Hines, the head of the nominating committee for the board. The following year, nearly 40 percent of the board was female.

According to Gary Desir, previous chair of the Yale Medicine Board, this year, the board has taken new initiative to increase its diversity by focusing on additional outreach.

“The idea was to reach out more broadly than before and include SWIM, which is the Committee on the Status of Women in Medicine, and MORE, which is the Minority Organization for Retention and Expansion,” Desir said.

As per the initiative, the Yale Medicine Board reached out to the head of SWIM, Nina Stachenfeld, and asked her to suggest two candidates to be considered for the board, according to Bia. This led to the changes and additions to board leadership — the four new faculty members and new board chair. 

Ahuja, the board’s new chair, has served as the first female chair of surgery at Yale since February 2018, as well as

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The New York Academy Of Medicine Welcomes New Board Chair Dr. Wayne Riley, President Of SUNY …

New York, NY, Oct. 21, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The New York Academy of Medicine (NYAM) and SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University jointly announced Wayne J. Riley, MD, MPH, MBA, MACP, as Chair of NYAM’s Board of Trustees. Dr. Riley is the 17th president of the Brooklyn-based SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University, where he also holds tenured professorships in internal medicine, health policy, and management. Dr. Riley joined the NYAM Board of Trustees in 2017.  

He is the first African American to lead the organization’s board as he succeeds James Flynn, MS, President, Deerfield Management Company LP.

With nearly 175 years of leadership in medical science, advocacy to improve medicine, public health, and disparities in healthcare, NYAM’s mission to attain health equity in pursuit of a healthier New York—and the world—has never been more vital. The COVID-19 pandemic has laid bare the inequities—furthered by a 400-year legacy of systemic racism—that have created poor health outcomes for millions, many in communities of color. NYAM is responding to this public health crisis with the passion and unique know-how of its longstanding institutional expertise, as well as a commitment to addressing social justice issues to reach health equity. 

Since joining the NYAM board, Dr. Riley’s guidance and leadership have significantly impacted NYAM’s strategic plans, including its new  Action Agenda for Health Equity. Fueled by the current state of health inequities, Dr. Riley’s ongoing contributions and leadership of the Board of NYAM and its partnership with the executive leadership will help lay the groundwork to improve the health and well-being of New Yorkers in the years to come. 

“Dr. Riley’s leadership of the NYAM’s Board of Trustees will enhance and enrich NYAM’s perspectives in our pursuit of disrupting common thinking patterns, changing systems and bolstering the influence of our work to result in meaningful change,” said NYAM President Dr. Judith A. Salerno, MD, MS. “We are fortunate to benefit from his wealth of experience as a top physician, educator, and administrator, and I can think of no one better to head our Board as we continue to pursue our vision of a world where everyone has the opportunity to live a healthy life.”

“I am honored to assume the role of Chairman of the Board of The New York Academy of Medicine,” said Dr. Riley. “At this critical time in New York and our nation, while we deal with a global pandemic, unjustifiable and worrisome distrust of medicine and science, social justice matters, systemic racism, and persistent health disparities—all of which significantly impact communities of color—understanding the intersectionality of where these variables meet begs for viable solutions, and systematic, positive outcomes. NYAM’s voice, advocacy, and leadership remain critically important in affecting positive change, and I look forward to the work we will continue to engage in as a Board and an organization.”

 “We are pleased to congratulate Dr. Riley on his historic appointment as Chairman of NYAM’s Board of Trustees,” said Dr. Steven J. Corwin, president, and CEO of NewYork-Presbyterian. “Dr. Riley is

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Maryland University of Integrative Health Appoints New Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine Department Chair

Laurel, Md. – Maryland University of Integrative Health is pleased to announce that it has appointed Dr. Sharon Jennings-Rojas as the new chair of its acupuncture and Oriental medicine department. She brings a wealth of professional experiences to the role as a clinician, community health advocate, faculty member, and administrator.

Dr. Jennings-Rojas’ career includes a strong emphasis on community outreach and services. Since 2001, she has maintained a private practice providing care for individuals, families, and communities, and has served as a consultant, acupuncturist, and educator for the Howard County (MD) Detention Center and the Goucher College Student Health Center. She has also provided acupuncture detox services at Lincoln Hospital in New York, directed a maternal substance abuse acupuncture program as part of University of Maryland Medical Systems, consulted with the Federal Bureau of Prisons to incorporate acupuncture and meditation into recovery programs, and directed acupuncture and HIV administrative services for the CAMBA community support organization in the New York City area. Her work also includes providing access and advocacy for wounded warriors within various military installations.

“It’s paramount that we elevate the next generation of practitioners/healers. In this day and time, this new level of compassionate care is calling us all to take action by making integrative health, inclusive of acupuncture and other forms of world medicine, accessible to all people, including marginalized populations. We need more focus and care that provide an expanded understanding of the co-morbidities that plague underserved communities. Education and access are the keys. Once communities, and the people within them, know their natural healthcare options, and holistic ways of bolstering their health, they are more empowered to take their healthcare and wellness into their own hands. Education, self-advocacy, and access are key features of a healthcare system that can truly bring forth health and healing in all communities. MUIH is in a position to help redefine how we provide healthcare in this country. We’re prepared to take compassionate care to the next level, for all people and all communities.” said Dr. Jennings-Rojas.

She holds a Master of Acupuncture, and a Doctorate of Oriental Medicine from MUIH, as well as a B.A. in Eastern Philosophy from Vassar College. She has also completed graduate coursework in the philosophy of education from Teachers College of Columbia University. She also holds certification as a practitioner and trainer for the NADA protocol/ Ear acupuncture to address addictions, stress, and trauma. Dr. Jennings-Rojas has been a longstanding member of the MUIH community as a student, faculty, and staff member. She previously held several roles in MUIH’s acupuncture and Oriental medicine department including clinical faculty, director of community partnerships, and division chair of clinical practices.

“Dr. Jennings-Rojas has the experience and vision to expand acupuncture access across healthcare settings and within communities. Her academic, administrative, and clinical backgrounds make Dr. Jennings-Rojas the ideal leader for educating an acupuncture workforce prepared to address the complexity of modern healthcare needs,” said Dr. James Snow, Dean of Academic Affairs.

About Maryland University of Integrative

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The New York Academy Of Medicine Welcomes New Board Chair Dr. Wayne Riley, President Of SUNY Downstate

Historic moment as a 173-year-old institution dedicated to medicine, public health, and health equity elects first Black physician as Chair of its Board of Trustees.

New York, NY, Oct. 21, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The New York Academy of Medicine (NYAM) and SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University jointly announced Wayne J. Riley, MD, MPH, MBA, MACP, as Chair of NYAM’s Board of Trustees. Dr. Riley is the 17th president of the Brooklyn-based SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University, where he also holds tenured professorships in internal medicine, health policy, and management. Dr. Riley joined the NYAM Board of Trustees in 2017.  

He is the first African American to lead the organization’s board as he succeeds James Flynn, MS, President, Deerfield Management Company LP.

With nearly 175 years of leadership in medical science, advocacy to improve medicine, public health, and disparities in healthcare, NYAM’s mission to attain health equity in pursuit of a healthier New York—and the world—has never been more vital. The COVID-19 pandemic has laid bare the inequities—furthered by a 400-year legacy of systemic racism—that have created poor health outcomes for millions, many in communities of color. NYAM is responding to this public health crisis with the passion and unique know-how of its longstanding institutional expertise, as well as a commitment to addressing social justice issues to reach health equity. 

Since joining the NYAM board, Dr. Riley’s guidance and leadership have significantly impacted NYAM’s strategic plans, including its new Action Agenda for Health Equity. Fueled by the current state of health inequities, Dr. Riley’s ongoing contributions and leadership of the Board of NYAM and its partnership with the executive leadership will help lay the groundwork to improve the health and well-being of New Yorkers in the years to come. 

“Dr. Riley’s leadership of the NYAM’s Board of Trustees will enhance and enrich NYAM’s perspectives in our pursuit of disrupting common thinking patterns, changing systems and bolstering the influence of our work to result in meaningful change,” said NYAM President Dr. Judith A. Salerno, MD, MS. “We are fortunate to benefit from his wealth of experience as a top physician, educator, and administrator, and I can think of no one better to head our Board as we continue to pursue our vision of a world where everyone has the opportunity to live a healthy life.”

“I am honored to assume the role of Chairman of the Board of The New York Academy of Medicine,” said Dr. Riley. “At this critical time in New York and our nation, while we deal with a global pandemic, unjustifiable and worrisome distrust of medicine and science, social justice matters, systemic racism, and persistent health disparities—all of which significantly impact communities of color—understanding the intersectionality of where these variables meet begs for viable solutions, and systematic, positive outcomes. NYAM’s voice, advocacy, and leadership remain critically important in affecting positive change, and I look forward to the work we will continue to engage in as a Board and an organization.”

 “We

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There’s a slim chance a COVID-19 vaccine may be ready by Christmas, says chair of U.K. Vaccine Taskforce

With so much on the line in the race to find a COVID-19 vaccine, it was bound to get ugly.

When Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi took aim at the MHRA, Britain’s version of the FDA, saying it’s “not on par with ours,” the chair of the U.K.’s Vaccine Taskforce had to call her out.

“With great respect to Nancy Pelosi, I just don’t think she’s correct,” said Kate Bingham. “I think the MHRA standards for safety and efficacy and our track record of robust evaluation as a regulator is world class. So I just don’t think she is right to say that the FDA standards are held to a higher standard than those of the MHRA.”

Pelosi’s comments may be a preemptive in case President Trump plans on invoking emergency powers to greenlight a vaccine, saying “if Boris Johnson decides he’s going to approve a drug and this president embraces that, that’s the concern I have.”

But it underlines the tensions even between traditional allies as several vaccine candidates get closer to reality.

Bingham said there is a slim chance there may be a vaccine by Christmas. 

“There is a slim chance,” she said. “I think it’s more likely that it’ll be in early next year.”

That optimism comes with caveats. Bingham said it’s not a one-size-fits-all, or a one-and-done. “So I think we’re going to have to find vaccines that will provide as much protection as possible, and then we’re likely to have to give booster vaccines, much like, again, a flu shot.”  

She said initial recipients will be those who need it most: the elderly, the vulnerable and health care workers.

A vaccine being developed by Oxford University and AstraZeneca continues to be among the frontrunners in the U.K., but it has fallen behind in the United States, where clinical trials remain on pause under FDA orders.

Pfizer has been the most aggressive in its timeline, but the company has said it has no intention of applying for emergency authorization before the end of November, taking itself out of the running in President Trump’s promise a vaccine will be ready before Election Day.

The final stretch of this race may ultimately come down to the regulators.

“As soon as they’ve got the data, they can file with the regulatory authorities around the world. And then there will be a race between the regulatory authorities as to who approves. Who will be quicker? I have no idea,” said Bingham. “What I do know is that I think it’s unlikely that the MHRA will be subject to political pressure and certainly as reported in the press, that may not be always the case in the States.” 

But she added: “I don’t think any amount of political pressure will affect what the FDA actually does and what the vaccine companies do, because there is a very clear commitment to safety and efficacy. And it’s not in anybody’s interest to approve a vaccine that isn’t safe and efficacious and that

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