Dentist held for south Delhi hit-and-run case – cities

New Delhi:

Police on Tuesday said they have arrested a 42-year-old dentist for allegedly running over a 38-year-old woman when she was crossing the road in south Delhi’s Lado Sarai last month.

The dentist allegedly fled the mishap spot after hitting the woman who worked at a private bank. The Honda City car he was driving has been recovered, police said.

Deputy commissioner of police (south) Atul Kumar Thakur said that around 8.30 pm on November 17, the police control room received a call about an accident at the Lado Sarai traffic signal.

A police team reached the spot and found that the injured woman had been shifted to the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS).

The team reached the hospital and learnt that the woman was declared brought dead. She was identified as Archana Kushwaha, a native of Allahabad in Uttar Pradesh.

Kushwaha worked as a customer associate at a private bank in Gurugram, Haryana, and lived at a paying guest (PG) accommodation in Lado Sarai.

“It was a case of hit-and-run and the suspect fled along with his vehicle. A case of rash and negligent driving causing death was registered and teams were formed to investigate the case,” said a police officer.

Kushwaha’s family members used social media to disseminate information about her death and to seek help from people in getting justice for her.

“I posted details about my sister’s death in the road accident case. The police assured they will find the culprit. On Tuesday, they informed me about his arrest and seizure of the Honda City car that hit my sister,” said Pankaj Kushwah, brother of the woman.

DCP Thakur said CCTV cameras on the route were scanned and police zeroed in on a Honda City car and apprehended its driver, who was identified as Pankaj Sudhakar (42), a resident of Kalkaji Extension in Delhi.

Sudhakar runs a dentist clinic in Saket, Thakur said.“He was speeding at the time of the accident,” Thakur said.

Kushwaha is survived by her parents and four siblings, including two sisters.

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Virginia Coronavirus Case Average Reaches New High In Last Week

VIRGINIA — The seven-day average of new coronavirus cases has reached a new peak in Virginia as cases have been over 1,000 for six straight days.

Because the Virginia Department of Health coronavirus dashboard was down for maintenance for much of Saturday, we’re providing an update on the weekend. The month of October ended with 1,551 new cases on Saturday, and 1,202 were reported on Sunday. Cumulative cases total 182,392.

The seven-day case average is 1,289 and has been increasing in the last week. The highest new case count in October had been 1,844 on Oct. 8, but that was attributed to a backlog of cases from the previous day.

By region, the new cases on Sunday included 373 in the southwest region, 300 in the northern region, 186 in the central region, 180 in the northwest region and 163 in the eastern region. The southwest region also reported 582 new cases on Saturday, marking the highest daily cases to date for the region.

The statewide positive average is up to 5.7 percent with 2,647,659 PCR tests completed to date. Seven-day averages by region are 9.4 percent in the southwest region, 5.6 percent in the northern region, 5.4 percent in the central region, 4.3 percent in the eastern region, and 3.5 percent in the northwest region.

There was just one new death reported on Sunday and 11 on Saturday. Total deaths to date are up to 3,655. When looking at deaths by the date on death certificates, the highest seven-day average remains 40.1 deaths on May 5. Data may be incomplete for the last few weeks, but the average has been half of the May 5 peak or less in recent months.

Cumulative hospitalizations stand at 12,647, while the current patient count is 1,012. By region, that includes 284 in the southwest region, 242 in the northern region, 196 in the central region, 162 in the eastern region, and 128 in the northwest region.

The 1,012 statewide hospitalizations include 98 patients on ventilators and 228 in the intensive care units, according to the Virginia Hospital & Healthcare Association. Ventilator use among all hospital patients stands at 28 percent, and ICU occupancy is at 61 percent occupancy. No hospitals are reporting difficulty obtaining personal protective equipment or other medical supplies in the next 72 hours.

Outbreaks, defined as two or more laboratory-confirmed cases in a setting, account for 28,019 cases to date. There have been 12,608 cases and 1,782 deaths in long-term care facilities. K-12 settings account for 212 cases and no deaths, while colleges and universities have 2,466 outbreak-associated cases and no deaths.

Below are the latest coronavirus data updates for our coverage area from Friday to Sunday:

  • Alexandria: 4,349 cases, 325 hospitalizations, 74 deaths; increase of 46 cases and one hospitalization

  • Arlington County: 4,764 cases, 541 hospitalizations, 154 deaths; increase of 78 cases

  • Fairfax County: 24,233 cases, 2,287 hospitalizations, 605 deaths; increase of 289 cases and nine hospitalizations

  • Fairfax City: 164 cases, 14 hospitalizations, eight deaths;

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At least 31 states set their one-day coronavirus case records in October

October was a month of grim records in the Covid-19 pandemic, and as November begins, experts say the US hasn’t seen the worst of it yet.



a person in a blue room: Medical staff members work in the COVID-19 intensive care unit (ICU) at the United Memorial Medical Center (UMMC) on October 31, 2020 in Houston, Texas. According to reports, Texas has reached over 916,000 cases, including over 18,000 deaths. (Photo by Go Nakamura/Getty Images)


© Go Nakamura/Getty Images
Medical staff members work in the COVID-19 intensive care unit (ICU) at the United Memorial Medical Center (UMMC) on October 31, 2020 in Houston, Texas. According to reports, Texas has reached over 916,000 cases, including over 18,000 deaths. (Photo by Go Nakamura/Getty Images)

From Alaska to Maine, at least 31 states across the US reported at least one record-high day of new coronavirus cases in the past month, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. And 15 reported their highest one-day tallies of Covid-19 deaths.

The country’s seven-day average of new daily cases was 78,380 Saturday — a number that has risen 128.2% since a post-summer-surge low on September 12. With any potential vaccine still a ways off from possible distribution, and the colder months threatening to increase spread, experts emphasize more people need to regularly take precautions to stem the rise anytime soon.

“It’s the way we protect our neighbors and our communities. And we need to avoid crowds. We have to socially distance. You can’t go to a mass gathering now. We need to lower our viral footprint,” Dr. Jonathan Reiner, professor of medicine at George Washington University, told CNN on Saturday.

October was unprecedented for several recorded metrics associated with the pandemic.

Of the country’s seven highest daily tallies of new cases, six were in October. The highest — 99,321 recorded on Friday — was the most recorded in one day for any one nation so far.

The number of US Covid-19 patients in hospitals on Saturday, October’s last day, was 47,374 — 65.6% higher than it was on September 20, when it was at a low following the summer surge.

And Reiner said there is no sign that the number of daily cases will drop soon.

“We won’t peak until we change our behaviors. And our behaviors that principally need to change are our lack of masking all over the country,” he said.

The country has recorded more than 9.1 million infections and 230,548 deaths during the pandemic, according to JHU.

A spike in deaths could come, experts say

Hospitals could become overwhelmed as the number of coronavirus cases continues to climb, Dr. Christopher Murray, director of the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), told CNN’s Anderson Cooper on Friday.

In El Paso, Texas, where hospitals are struggling to keep up with the number of Covid-19 patients, officials are preparing to add a third mobile morgue unit in anticipation of a spike in deaths.

“If that doesn’t put our situation into perspective I don’t know what will,” County Judge Ricardo Samaniego wrote on Facebook.

The number of hospitalizations is the best measure of how the nation is faring in the coronavirus pandemic, Murray said.

“They are a leading indicator ahead of deaths,” he said.

Murray and his colleagues at IHME are

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Australia has no local case 1st time in months

CANBERRA, Australia — Australia has recorded no new locally transmitted coronavirus infection for the first time in five months.

In Melbourne, the capital of Victoria state, which had the highest number of cases in the country, residents were enjoying the first weekend of cafes, restaurants and pubs reopening to walk-in customers.

The city only has one mystery case without a known source. There are 61 active cases left across the state, down from 70 on Saturday.

State Deputy Premier James Merlino hailed Sunday’s zero figures as “another great day for Victoria,” but urged caution ahead of Australia’s most-prestigious horse race on Tuesday, the Melbourne Cup, known as the “race that stops a nation.” Australians traditionally gather in bars or in private homes to watch the event, a public holiday.

The race attracts crowds of more than 100,000 at Melbourne’s Flemington race course, but this year it will held without fans because of restrictions on public gatherings.


Chief Health Officer Brett Sutton urged Victorians to enjoy the Cup but to continue obeying guidance on mask-wearing and social distancing.

“The great majority of Melburnians know what do to,” Sutton said. “There will be a few who may be a bit liberal in their behavior.”

Sutton said the new wave of infections in Europe showed how quickly the coronavirus can reassert itself.

“What Europe is going through now is a consequence of not being able to get to this point where you can stay on top of very low numbers,” he said. “What we have created is very precious and we need to hold onto it tightly.”

Western Australia state on Sunday recorded one new case of COVID-19, a woman who returned from overseas and is in hotel quarantine.

___

HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— Halloween in the pandemic: Costumes and candy, at a distance

— England to enter new lockdown; UK virus cases pass 1 million

— Minority US contact tracers build trust in diverse cities

— Efraín Valles guided world leaders, pop stars and a princess on exclusive tours through the land of the Incas. He now makes ice cream to survive amid the pandemic.

— The government of the Netherlands will halt its multibillion euro coronavirus bailout to national carrier KLM amid a standoff with a pilot’s union about terms of the rescue package.

— Austria has announced a partial shutdown that will see restaurants and bars closed for four weeks, cultural, sports and leisure activities canceled, and residents asked to stay home after 8 p.m.

___

Follow AP’s coronavirus pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

___

HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING:

SANTA FE, N.M. — Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham on Saturday said the spread of coronavirus is out of control in New Mexico as she urged residents to stay home and avoid gathering with others to celebrate Halloween.

“Please — do your part to protect yourself and your fellow New Mexicans by celebrating a COVID-SAFE Halloween,” the Democratic governor’s office said in a

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Singapore MMA show test case for return of sports fans

Singapore’s pilot initiative to carry out rapid coronavirus testing to allow fans into a One Championship MMA show could show the way for other countries to host sports events during the pandemic, organisers said.

Sports have been slowly resuming worldwide after a months-long shutdown, but many events have gone ahead with no spectators, to reduce infection risks.

Up to 250 mask-wearing fans on Friday will attend the mixed martial arts card, “One: Inside the Matrix”, at an indoor stadium — the city state’s first sports event with an audience for months.

The screenings are part of a government pilot programme under which people will be tested for Covid-19 before large-scale gatherings, and comes as Singapore prepares to further ease restrictions as its outbreak slows.

Fans will have to get negative results in antigen tests, which can identify at least 80 percent of infected people and provide results in about 15 minutes.

“This is a first for Singapore and if we are successful, will pave the way for others to follow as we safely return to some normalcy,” said Teh Hua Fung, group president of One Championship, Asia’s biggest MMA promotion.

“They can’t be isolating, waiting (a long time) for the results beforehand.”

Spectators will also sit apart from one another to reduce the risk of infection, and no food and drinks will be on sale, with fans instead given goody bags.

“People are dying to watch, even if they have to socially distance,” Teh said. 

“It’s going to be a different experience… But it’s a start.”

Ninety-eight people, including 42 athletes, have been flown into the city state for the event featuring six fights. Fifteen fights will also be pre-recorded for release at a later date.

Two men from the United States and Russia assisting the fighters tested positive for the virus on Tuesday, but the results were determined to be from previous infections, organisers said.

They were tested again on Thursday, and will only be allowed to participate if the latest tests show negative results.

One Championship was unable to hold matches for almost four months because of the pandemic, but it resumed in China in June and staged its first international event in Singapore this month, without fans.

mba/sr/am/leg

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How they went 200 days without a locally transmitted case

As much of the world struggles to contain new waves of the Covid-19 pandemic, Taiwan just marked its 200th consecutive day without a locally transmitted case of the disease.



A woman holds a Taiwanese flag to cover her face as as she joins others at a rally to mark Taiwan's National Day, in the Tsim Sha Tsui district in Hong Kong on October 10, 2019. - Taiwan's National Day, also called called Double-Ten in a reference to the nationalist Republic of China set up by Sun Yat Sen on October 10, 1911, ending centuries of Chinese dynastic rule. (Photo by Philip FONG / AFP) (Photo by PHILIP FONG/AFP via Getty Images)


© PHILIP FONG/AFP/AFP via Getty Images
A woman holds a Taiwanese flag to cover her face as as she joins others at a rally to mark Taiwan’s National Day, in the Tsim Sha Tsui district in Hong Kong on October 10, 2019. – Taiwan’s National Day, also called called Double-Ten in a reference to the nationalist Republic of China set up by Sun Yat Sen on October 10, 1911, ending centuries of Chinese dynastic rule. (Photo by Philip FONG / AFP) (Photo by PHILIP FONG/AFP via Getty Images)

Taipei’s response to the coronavirus pandemic has been one of the world’s most effective. The island of 23 million people last reported a locally transmitted case on April 12, which was Easter Sunday. As of Thursday, it had confirmed 553 cases — only 55 of which were local transmissions. Seven deaths have been recorded.

Easter was an important milestone in the United States because President Donald Trump had said a month earlier he wanted the country “opened up and just raring to go” by the holiday.

At that point, 1.7 million people had been infected and 110,000 had been killed by the virus — globally. On Friday, those figures were nearing 45 million cases and more than 1.1 million deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University.

Taiwan’s landmark achievement comes in a week when France and Germany are enacting new lockdowns and the United States identified a record 88,000-plus cases in a day. The state of Florida, which has a similar population size to Taiwan, with approximately 21 million people, identified 4,188 cases on Wednesday alone.

Taiwan has never had to enact strict lockdowns. Nor did it resort to drastic restrictions on civil freedoms, like in mainland China.

Instead, Taiwan’s response focused on speed. Taiwanese authorities began screening passengers on direct flights from Wuhan, where the virus was first identified, on December 31, 2019 — back when the virus was mostly the subject of rumors and limited reporting.

Taiwan confirmed its first reported case of the novel coronavirus on January 21 and then banned Wuhan residents from traveling to the island. All passengers arriving from mainland China, Hong Kong and Macao were required to undergo screening.

All this happened before Wuhan itself went into lockdown on January 23. By March, Taiwan banned all foreign nationals from entering the island, apart from diplomats, residents and those with special entry visas.

But Taiwan has advantages its counterparts in the West do not.

One is geography — Taiwan is an island, so it’s easier for officials to control entry and exit through its borders.

Taiwan also had experience on its side. After suffering through the deadly outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2003, Taiwan worked to build up its capacity to deal with a pandemic, Taiwanese Foreign Minister Joseph Wu said in an interview

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Santa Cruz County Enters Orange Tier; Latest COVID-19 Case Count

SANTA CRUZ COUNTY, CA — More services can now increase indoor capacity after Santa Cruz County moved into the less-restrictive orange tier Monday.

The orange tier is the second-lowest tier in the state four-tiered, color-coded risk system and indicates a “moderate” COVID-19 risk level. Santa Cruz County is seeing reduced COVID-19 transmission levels, but cases are expected to increase into the winter months, the county said in a statement. Nationally, cases have already begun to rise.

The news came hours after county officials announced plans to ramp up testing for the coronavirus and said that an outbreak at a Watsonville skilled nursing facility appears to have subsided.

The following reopenings are now allowed in Santa Cruz County, with safety restrictions:

  • Restaurants (half-capacity indoors)

  • Worship houses (half-capacity indoors)

  • Gyms and fitness centers (25 percent capacity or 100 people indoors; whichever is fewer)

  • Movie theaters (half-capacity indoors)

  • Museums (half-capacity indoors)

  • Retail (full capacity indoors)

  • Bars, breweries and distilleries (outdoor operations only)

  • Wineries (25 percent capacity or 100 people indoors; whichever is fewer)

  • Amusement parks (outdoors only and 25 percent capacity or 100 people; whichever is fewer)

  • Family entertainment Centers (25 percent capacity)

  • Non-essential Offices (indoors with modifications)

  • Live-audience sports (outdoors, regional visitors only; 20 percent capacity)

Residents are asked to continue wearing face coverings, practicing social distancing, staying home when sick and avoiding large group gatherings.

County Health Officer Dr. Gail Newel said during a Tuesday morning press conference that an outbreak at Watsonville Post Acute Center — one of seven skilled nursing facilities in the county — appears to have stabilized. No patients are currently infected and there have been no recent new infections, she said.

There were 74 residents of the center when the outbreak first began in mid-September, and 50 residents and 21 staff tested positive for COVID-19, she said. Fifteen deaths have been linked to the outbreak.

Newel said the center has followed all precautions and remained in consultation with county and state officials. The center is not accepting new patients.

“It’s a tragedy, but its probably unavoidable that this happened,” she said.

Mimi Hall, county Health Services Agency Director, announced plans to expand testing capacity in Santa Cruz County. Widespread testing is key to staying in a lesser tier, she said.

The county is seeking to add a testing site in Mid- to North County that can provide 165 tests per day, she said. Officials have also put in a request to the state health department officials to provide resources that would allow the county to double testing capacity at a Watsonville site and provide 330 tests there per day, for four days.

The University of California, Santa Cruz lab has expanded its efforts to regularly test on-campus students and staff, Hall said. The university continues to serve as a backup lab for the county and health system partners.

Newel urged residents to seek COVID-19 testing as soon as they start noticing associated symptoms and get a flu shot. People are more susceptible to COVID-19

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Positive Coronavirus Case At Clark’s Trunk Or Treat

CLARK, NJ — A person who attended Clark’s Trunk or Treat event has tested positive for the coronavirus, the Clark Health Department stated.

The event was held on Saturday at the Clark Municipal Building.

The Clark Health Department is warning anyone who went to the event to monitor for COVID-19 symptoms, fever, chills, muscle aches/pains, cough, sore throat, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, wheezing, abdominal pain, and diarrhea to name a few.

Anyone with questions or concerns should speak with their primary care physician or pediatrician.

“If you are feeling ill, stay home from school, work and limit exposure with other people,” Clark Health Officer Nancy Raymond said. “Continue to practice social distancing, good hand hygiene, sanitize high hand contact surfaces and wear face coverings that cover your nose, mouth and chin.”

Those who are being tested for the COVID-19 virus, must stay home until they receive their result.
Those who may test positive will be contacted by the Clark Health Department for further guidance and contact tracing.

As of Friday, the Clark Health Department reports a total of 337 COVID-19 cases in Clark with 333 closed and 4 cases pending.

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This article originally appeared on the Clark-Garwood Patch

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Having more than 5 coronavirus symptoms may predict long-COVID case

  • Patients who experience more than five COVID-19 symptoms during their first week of illness are more likely to have a long-term case, according to a new study.
  • Certain symptoms in particular — fatigue, headache, difficulty breathing, a hoarse voice, and muscle or body aches — were also found to be early signs that a patient might not recover quickly.
  • Age, gender, and BMI could play a role as well, according to the study.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

For a select group of coronavirus patients known as “long-haulers,” the onset of symptoms is the beginning of an extended battle. Many COVID-19 patients develop weeks- or months-long illnesses that researchers now call “long-COVID.”  

These individuals are difficult to study, since not all received a proper diagnosis initially due to testing shortages or the abnormal nature of their symptoms. Some may simply not report lingering ailments, making them difficult for researchers to track.

But a spate of preliminary studies are beginning to pinpoint the early signs that a patient won’t recover right away.

A recent study from King’s College London, which is still awaiting peer review, examined more than 4,000 coronavirus patients across Sweden, the UK, and the US by asking them to record their symptoms in an app. About 20% said they still weren’t feeling better after four weeks — the threshold at which the researchers mark a case of long-COVID. By eight weeks, around 190 patients reported lingering symptoms. And by 12 weeks, nearly 100 patients said they hadn’t recovered yet.

Patients who experienced more than five symptoms during the first week of their illness were significantly more likely to develop long-COVID, the study found. That was true across sex and age groups.

The researchers also identified five symptoms that predicted a case of long-COVID more than others: fatigue, headache, difficulty breathing, a hoarse voice, and muscle or body aches. This could offer clues about targets for future COVID-19 treatments.

“It’s important we use the knowledge we have gained from the first wave in the pandemic to reduce the long-term impact of the second,” Dr. Claire Steves, the study’s senior author, said in a statement. “Thanks to the diligent logging of our contributors so far, this research could already pave the way for preventative and treatment strategies for long-COVID.”

Nearly 98% of patients with long-COVID in the study reported fatigue, while 91% reported a headache.  

“We know that fatigue is a huge component, so I’m really glad that their research captured that,” Natalie Lambert, an associate professor of medicine at Indiana University who wasn’t involved in the study, told Business Insider.

Lambert is also looking at patterns of symptoms among long-COVID patients. All of the roughly 1,500 long-haulers she surveyed in July said they’d experienced fatigue at some point in their illness. Roughly two-thirds said they had experienced muscle or body aches. The same amount said they had difficulty breathing, and around 58% said they had developed a headache.

The results of the King’s College study, Lambert said,

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H.K. Eases Some Rules; India Case Growth Slows: Virus Update

(Bloomberg) — Hong Kong will ease some social distancing rules and announced plans for mandatory testing of people with symptoms and specific groups as India’s daily infections fell below 40,000 for the first time in more than three months.

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Eli Lilly & Co. said a U.S.-run clinical trial of its experimental antibody therapy will end while AstraZeneca Plc’s vaccine candidate produced a robust immune response in elderly people. New research from the U.K. suggests antibody responses may diminish over time.

The latest surge in U.S. coronavirus cases sent the S&P 500 Index to its biggest drop in a month. An infection spike that started with younger Americans is now moving to older communities.

Key Developments:

Global Tracker: Cases top 43.4 million; deaths exceed 1.15 millionU.S. ‘surge’ virus testing targets asymptomatic peopleCovid Fear Is Back and Driving Markets Again: John AuthersP&G’s new Lysol competitor wins EPA approval to fight virusAmericans see record flu shot demand in first season with CovidU.S. recovery’s surprise strength linked to aid, quick reopeningVaccine Tracker: Vaccine trials restart, providing hope

Subscribe to a daily update on the virus from Bloomberg’s Prognosis team here. Click CVID on the terminal for global data on coronavirus cases and deaths.



chart, histogram: Seven-day average of U.S. death toll is at 800 again


© Bloomberg
Seven-day average of U.S. death toll is at 800 again

Hong Kong to Relax Some Social Distancing, Bars to Stay Open Later (2:52 p.m. HK)

Hong Kong will allow more people to sit at the same table in bars and restaurants as well as letting them stay open later.

From Friday, restaurants will be allowed to stay open until 2 a.m. with six people permitted at a table, up from four, Secretary for Food and Health Sophia Chan told a briefing on Tuesday. Bars also will be open later with the limit on patrons doubling to four per table.

Hong Kong also eased its rule mandating face masks for people exercising at indoor venues but a four-person limit on public gatherings will stay for another week.

Earlier, Chief Executive Carrie Lam said the city would re-open public beaches as the Asian financial starts legislative work on mandatory Covid-19 testing for specific groups including people with symptoms.

Bulgaria Posts Record High New Cases, Deaths (2:08 p.m. HK)

Bulgaria reported record numbers of new cases, deaths and patients in intensive care, putting fresh pressure on the country’s health-care system.

The Balkan country reported 2,243 daily coronavirus cases, the first time new infections topped 2,000, as well as 42 deaths. The numbers come as Prime Minister Boyko Borissov is recovering at home after testing positive for Covid-19.

Dubai in Talks on London Air-Travel Agreement to Boost Demand (12:15 p.m. HK)

A plan to open up air travel between Dubai and London is ready and could be implemented once approved by the respective governments, according to the head of the emirate’s airport operator.

Testing and quarantine requirements have been agreed by hubs and airlines, Paul Griffiths, chief executive officer of Dubai Airports, said in an interview. Whether they move forward lies

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