Nova Scotia fitness business requests exemption to stay open amid COVID-19

The owner of a fitness facility in Halifax has written a letter to the province asking for an exemption to stay open out of concern for his clients.



a desktop computer sitting on top of a chair: Image of OneUp Fitness.


© Global/Ashley Fields
Image of OneUp Fitness.

The owner of OneUp Fitness, Matt Mombourquette, said what sets his facility apart from other commercial gyms is its small size, one-on-one, appointment based-training. Its average demographic is people aged 55 and up.

“A lot of our clients have chronic health conditions, such as osteoporosis, orthopedic pain, we have some clients with Parkinson’s disease, muscular dystrophy,” said Mombourquette.

So when the province announced a second round of lockdown for fitness facilities, Mombourquette said he was concerned for his aging clientele.

Read more: Nova Scotia reports 37 new cases of COVID-19, shuts down bars, gyms

Between the facility’s Halifax and Bedford studios, Mombourquette said, they see roughly 150 clients per week, but fewer than half took up virtual classes when their doors closed in March.

“When they came back and we opened our doors again in June, we could see a lot of deterioration. They shared that they had a lot of physical challenges; they felt weaker, and some of them had some depression,” he said.

This is when he decided to write the letter to see if there was “some wiggle room” that existed for their facility.

On Tuesday, Dr. Robert Strang, chief medial officer of Nova Scotia, said there will be no exceptions to the rule.

“Our goal is to remain very tight for the shortest time possible, and every time we give an exception it creates another opportunity for a breakthrough that might then be the reason why we have to extend,” Strang said.

Trail use has increased during the coronavirus pandemic

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It’s a decision Mombourquette respects but says he’s frustrated by.

“I think everybody understands that exercise does have a big impact on positive immunity and keeping us safe from this current pandemic and potentially future ones,” he said.

One of Mombourquette’s clients is Jason Roth, a 70-year-old Halifax man, who has been coming to OneUp Fitness twice a week for the past 15 years. He tells Global News his health took a hit when the facility’s doors closed in March due to COVID-19.

“In terms of the sense of being in shape and fitness, I would say was about 50 per cent as effective as it had been,” said Roth.

He says he’s been to other, larger gyms and OneUp Fitness is different. He doesn’t believe it should be lumped into the same category.

“I’m not surrounded by a lot of people, equipment is immediately wiped down, people are in and people are out,” he said.

“That distinction between eating establishments and drive thru establishments, I think, would fit as a distinction between OneUp and the average gym.”

Fitness centre owner hoping to stay open amid COVID-19 closures

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Roth said that if an exemption were to be granted, he would gladly

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Dioxane levels rise; Michigan Medicine further restricts visitors; Small Business Saturday in A2

Happy Friday!

I hope you had a nice Thanksgiving, even though it likely looked different this year. Today is Black Friday, and although it’s known for great deals to be had at big-box stores, a lesser-known day is Small Business Saturday. Now more than ever, local businesses need support — especially as the pandemic and cold weather restrict operations.

Need some ideas? Main Street Ann Arbor just released its annual shopping guide. Here’s another guide that highlights businesses that are women- and minority-owned. Meanwhile, this gift guide focuses on local food and drink producers. Sarah has also spent the past several months speaking with local business owners and highlighting them for her Small Business Saturday series. Don’t see your favorite business on the list? Submit it here.

Have a great long weekend.

– Meredith (@meredith_A4)

What’s been happening:

⛔️ Michigan Medicine announced this week that no visitors are allowed for adult patients as COVID-19 cases spike across the state. There are some exceptions to the new policy, which took effect on Wednesday. (A4)

🚰 Recent tests from water samples taken in October in the West Park area reveal a spike in Dioxane levels, concerning local officials. (MLive)

🚶‍♀️ The city of Ann Arbor celebrated the grand opening of the Allen Creek Railroad Berm Project this week virtually. (A4)

🚲 Have a look at the new downtown protected bikeway on First Street. (MLive)

🛤 The long-awaited passenger train service from Ann Arbor to Traverse City — known as A2TC — has put test rides slated for 2021 on hold due to the pandemic. (Detroit Free Press)

🎓 A senior at the University of Michigan became the school’s 29th Rhodes Scholar since the awards were established in 1902. (A4)

💻 Toyota and Cisco have partnered to install free Wi-Fi at public sites in the region, including in Ann Arbor and Ypsilanti. (A4)

Good to know:

🌯 Vegan Kerrytown joint Detroit Street Filling Station expanded into the space next door. The owner said it could become a private dining space or intimate music venue. (A4)

🍪 Have kids ages 8 and up? Love holiday cookies? This local cooking school for kids will be hosting holiday cookie classes online for the whole family. (A4)

🎅 Santa’s Mailbox will return to Main St. this year. From Nov. 28-Dec. 14, write a letter to Santa with a return address and you will receive a response. (A4)

🤝 Tuesday is Giving Tuesday. The annual Rockin’ for the Hungry fund drive by Food Gatherers, ann arbor’s 107one and Kroger will kick off virtually on Tuesday, as will Ann Arbor Summer Festival’s campaign which will feature free performances by Michigan-based artists throughout the day. (A4)

Feature interview of the week:

“We had to pivot to something that is ironic for us, because the whole gist of Literati is that it is a community bookstore that

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Smart Fitness Device Market Research Expansion (2020-2029) Including COVID-19 Pandemic Business Impact | Apple Inc., Xiaomi

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Nov 20, 2020 (WiredRelease via Comtex) —
A consciously conceived and designed business intelligence report titled Global Smart Fitness Device market 2020 by Manufacturers, Type, and Application, Forecast to 2029 by MarketResearch.biz discloses a succinct analysis of the regional spectrum, market size, and revenue forecast about the market. This report sheds light on the vital developments along with other events happening in the global Smart Fitness Device market which is marking on the enlargement and opening doors for outlook growth in the coming years.

This is the latest report, covering the current COVID-19/Corona Virus pandemic impact on the market which has affected every aspect of life globally. This has brought along several changes in market conditions and the Business areas. The rapidly changing market scenario and initial and future assessment of the impact are covered in the Smart Fitness Device market report. 

For All-Inclusive Information: Download a FREE sample copy of Smart Fitness Device Market Report Study 2020-2029 at https://marketresearch.biz/report/smart-fitness-device-market/request-sample

(Our FREE SAMPLE COPY of the report gives a brief introduction to the research report outlook, list of tables and figures, Impact Analysis of COVID-19, TOC, an outlook to key players of the market and comprising key regions.)

Competitive Analysis:

The major companies are exceedingly focused on innovation in Smart Fitness Device production technology to enhance ledge life and efficiency. The best long-term development path for Smart Fitness Device market can be caught by guaranteeing financial pliancy to invest in the optimal strategies and current process improvement.

Key manufacturers are included based on the company profile, sales data and product specifications, etc: Apple Inc., Xiaomi, Garmin Ltd, Jawbone, LG Electronics, Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd, Sony Mobile Communications Inc., MAD Apparel, Inc., Sony Corporation, Nike Inc.

Each manufacturer or Smart Fitness Device market player’s growth rate, gross profit margin, and revenue figures is provided in a tabular, simple format for few years and an individual section on Smart Fitness Device market recent development such as collaboration, mergers, acquisition, and any new service or new product launching in the market is offered.

Smart Fitness Device Market Segmentation Outlook By product, type, and region:

Global smart fitness device market segmentation by product:
Smartwatch
Wristband
Smart clothing
Smart shoes
Bike computers
Others

Global smart fitness device market segmentation by type:
Head-wear
Torso-wear
Hand-wear
Leg-wear
Bike mount

Download Now And Browse Complete Information On The COVID 19 Impact Analysis On Smart Fitness Device Market: https://marketresearch.biz/report/smart-fitness-device-market/covid-19-impact

Regional Analysis:On the idea of geography, the Smart Fitness Device Market report covers statistics for a couple of geographies inclusive of, North America (U.S., Mexico, Canada) South America (Argentina, Brazil) The Middle East & Africa (South Africa, Saudi Arabia) Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, India, Southeast Asia) Europe (U.K., Spain, Italy, Germany, France, Russia)

In addition, The following years considered for this study to forecast the global Smart Fitness Device market size are as follows:

– Actual Year: 2019

– Estimated Year: 2020

– Forecast Year: 2020–2029

Some

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Many UK fitness venues may not survive winter Covid closures, say bosses | Business

Many hundreds of gyms and swimming pools will go out of business this winter if new post-lockdown restrictions being considered for England force them to remain closed, industry leaders have warned.

Huw Edwards, the chief executive of ukactive, said the government was thought to be considering keeping gyms and pools closed as part of a tradeoff for reopening other parts of the economy, such as pubs and restaurants, in December.

The prime minister is due to make a statement on Monday setting out a new system of tiers. The Guardian understands that all the new tiers will allow gyms to remain open, along with non-essential shops, although these exemptions may yet be revisited again if case levels rise steeply.

Pubs and restaurants have demanded a week’s warning of new rules that would kick in after the English lockdown ends on 2 December.

The UK’s 7,000 gyms, pools and leisure centres have sought to be reclassified as essential services vital to public health. The move is being debated by MPs on Monday after a petition attracted more than 600,000 signatures.

Gyms are currently shut in England and parts of Scotland, and are due to close in Northern Ireland on Friday. To further penalise the fitness industry would be a “political choice”, Edwards said as there was “no science” to support the idea that its venues were a source of infection.


Public Health England has also warned that any respite at Christmas would be paid for with tough restrictions afterwards. Shutdowns in January and February would be even more damaging for gyms, as it is their busiest period with Britons undertaking new year fitness regimes.

Edwards said having to shut again in the new year would be another hard blow for businesses. “Missing out on those months would be devastating, and we could end up losing up to 20% of all facilities if there is a sustained period of closure.”

About two-thirds of gyms and leisure centres in England are in private hands, with the 2,116 council-owned sites typically run by charitable trusts on their behalf. While the big chains have been bailed out by deep-pocketed investors, the operators of public facilities, which are often providing services for less affluent communities, are struggling.

Last week, GLL, the UK’s biggest leisure trust, which has more than 270 leisure centres – including the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park venues – on its books, announced that Oasis, the Swindon leisure centre that gave one of the UK’s biggest bands its name, was closing. Other centres, including sites in Preston and Newcastle, have already shut.

Mark Sesnan, the GLL chief executive, said it had used up its £20m rainy-day fund during the first quarantine. The Oasis centre, he said, relied “on getting a lot of people through the door. The business model doesn’t work under social distancing and it doesn’t work when you are shut. The costs are unsustainable.”

Sesnan is worried the government will decide gyms and pools can’t open because it sees the industry as

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Fitness CEO James Gullatte moved from prison to business owner

His name is James Gullatte, but you can call him Boss. His biceps, decorated with tattoos from a past life, bulge out of a cobalt T-shirt that shares his company tagline, Results Do Matter.

In 2004, Gullatte arrived in Columbus with about $100 in his pocket and a laser-sharp focus: to help as many people as possible get fit. Overcoming obstacles from poverty to homelessness and incarceration, today he’s a certified fitness trainer and owner of B.O.S.S. Fitness, a two-room gym just southeast of Downtown, where he has logged over 175,680 training hours with roughly 1,500 clients and has earned over $2 million.

Paint me a picture of you while growing up.

Gullatte: I grew up in Westwood. Growing up in Dayton, you either did two things: worked at GM or ran the streets. I started running the streets around 11 years old. I began to go take care of myself, stealing candy. I was taking it to school, selling two candy bars for a quarter, to make money, to take care of the things I couldn’t get at home.

James Gullatte owns B.O.S.S. Fitness on E. Livingston Avenue.

What do you think made you turn to crime at such a young age?

Gullatte: I remember the first time I got caught stealing. Everybody came over, so it triggered a signal in my mind that if you get in trouble, you get attention. I was a baseball star and I was traveling all over Ohio on all-star teams and made it to the Little League World Series, but no one ever came to the games. I translated getting in trouble with getting attention.

You spent time at a youth detention center in west Columbus. Why do you think you continued your path after you left there at 17?

Gullatte: When I got home, there were people now standing on the streets selling drugs. The community was going downhill. But everybody had money. I began to steal cars.

I had this small goal: I wanted to be able to purchase a kilo of cocaine, which at the time was $24,000, around 1987. It was all about survival. But then the bottom fell out. I became addicted to cocaine. That was part of the reason why my business fell apart, and I ended up with seven children by four different women. I lost everything and became homeless from 21 to 34. Sandwiched in between were 10 years in prison.

Can you point to a time, while incarcerated, when you decided to change your life?

Gullatte: Prison is where I learned how to love me. This picture is still in my head: It was 1995. I had just worked out, and I was feeling good about what I was doing, and it just hit me, it stopped me: I asked myself, “Do you love yourself?” I took a hard look at myself at age 25, while I was sitting inside this cage, and my journey began to change. From that point on, it was about how

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Capacity limitations threaten the survival of Tucson’s small fitness businesses | Business News

MAKING IT WORK

Concerned about whether their businesses can survive under the current capacity limitations, some owners have turned to outdoor classes, which are not limited by ADHS requirements as long as physical distancing is possible.

Soleil Chiquette, the owner of Let’s Sweat, opted to offer only outdoor classes after the second COVID-19 shutdown inhibited gyms and studios from operating in June.

Chiquette knew her customers weren’t comfortable being back inside, so she decided to offer spin and strength classes out on the Let’s Sweat patio, 439 N. Sixth Ave., and at Catalina Park instead. Let’s Sweat’s outdoor classes are popular among their clients, and they have allowed Chiquette to stay above water.

The same can be said for Lucas, the owner of Session Yoga. Lucas owns two studios at 123 S. Eastbourne Ave. and 1135 N. Jefferson Ave. One of her spaces is a strictly indoor studio that offers hot yoga classes, and the other has both indoor and outdoor options.

Lucas has been able to consistently offer outdoor classes, which has helped her keep her studios afloat.

“Luckily, I was able to continue with the outdoor yoga, so that sustained us from not closing permanently. Without that, I don’t think we would have made it,” Lucas said.

Some studio owners have been unable to transition to outdoor classes because they rely on an indoor environment to create a specific atmosphere.

At Tucson Yoga Sol, a hot yoga studio in northwest Tucson, this is the case. Instructors manipulate heaters to facilitate Bikram yoga and hot Pilates classes. The owner, Diane Van Maren, is unsure if she will be able to keep her business up and running if the current restrictions remain in place.

Source Article

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‘Obamacare’ sign-ups begin as millions more are uninsured | St. Louis business news

Hard numbers on how virus-related job losses have affected health coverage are not available because the most reliable government surveys will not be out until next year. Estimates range from 5 million to 10 million newly uninsured people. That’s on top of 26 million uninsured last year, before the pandemic, or about 8% of the U.S. population.

“There is a coverage crisis happening, ” said Stan Dorn, a health policy expert now with Families USA, a liberal advocacy group. “And there are fewer resources available to help, thanks to the Trump cuts.”

Dorn worries that’s “a setup for epic failure,” and many people will remain uninsured even as states across the country are seeing alarming increases in coronavirus cases.

Administration officials say HealthCare.gov is open for business and ready to handle sign-ups online or via its call center. “We’ll be working through the upcoming open enrollment period…to ensure a smooth user experience,” CMS Administrator Seema Verma said.

More than 11 million people currently have coverage through HealthCare.gov and state-run health insurance markets offering subsidized private plans. The health law also covers another 12 million people through its Medicaid expansion, adopted by all but 12 states.

Medicaid enrollment has gone up by nearly 4 million people since March, but it’s still unclear how many laid-off workers are coping after the loss of employer coverage in the coronavirus economy.

Source Article

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Trump Rule Requires Health Plans to Disclose Costs up Front | Business News

By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — Trying to pull back the veil on health care costs to encourage competition, the Trump administration on Thursday finalized a requirement for insurers to tell consumers up front the actual prices for common tests and procedures.

The late-innings policy play comes just days ahead of Election Day as President Donald Trump has been hammered on health care by Democratic challenger Joe Biden for the administration’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic and its unrelenting efforts to overturn “Obamacare,” the 2010 law providing coverage to more than 20 million people.

A related Trump administration price disclosure requirement applying to hospitals is facing a federal lawsuit from the industry, alleging coercion and interference with business practices.

The idea behind the new regulations on insurers is to empower patients to become better consumers of health care, thereby helping to drive down costs.

But the requirements would take effect gradually over a four-year period, and patients face a considerable learning curve to make cost-versus-quality decisions about procedures like knee replacements or hernia repairs. Add to that political uncertainty about the policy’s survival if Trump doesn’t get reelected, and the whole effort is running into skepticism.

Administration officials are adamant the changes will stand, arguing the goal of price transparency transcends political partisanship.

“It will be impossible to walk backwards on this,” Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said. “How do you fight transparency on prices? How do you actually articulate the argument that you should conceal what something costs from the person trying to purchase it?”

Insurance companies contend that the rules will boomerang economically, driving up costs. Hospitals and doctors now accepting discounted rates will press to get paid more once they see what their upper-end competitors are getting.

The new rules are being issued jointly by HHS, the Labor Department and the Treasury, which share jurisdiction over health insurance plans. They would:

— Starting in 2022, require insurers to make available data files on the costs of various procedures, allowing technology companies to design apps that let patients see costs not only under their own plan but other insurers’ plans as well.

— Starting in 2023, require insurers to make available to their policyholders cost-sharing details on 500 specific services, medical equipment and other items, as called for by the government.

— Starting in 2024, require insurers to make cost-sharing information available on all the services and goods they cover.

Patients would use an online shopping tool from their plan to see the negotiated rate between their doctor and the insurer, as well as an out-of-pocket cost estimate for procedures, drugs, durable medical equipment and any other item or service they may need.

The information would be available ahead of time, enabling an informed decision. Currently, most patients find out what they owe after they get back from the hospital and receive their “explanation of benefits” statement.

“We need to keep pricing on the front end, not the back end,” said Seema Verma, head

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The Latest: France Ponders New Restrictions as Cases Soar | Business News

PARIS — France’s government is holding emergency virus meetings Tuesday and warning of possible new lockdowns, as hospitals fill up with new COVID patients and doctors plead for backup.

President Emmanuel Macron is convening top ministers and Prime Minister Jean Castex is meeting with lawmakers, unions and business lobbies as the government weighs its next steps in the fight against surging infections. Interior Minister Gerald Darmanin told France-Inter radio that “we should expect difficult decisions.”

Among possible new measures for the hardest-hit areas are lengthening existing curfews, full confinement on weekends or all week, and closing non-essential businesses.

Doctors describe growing pressure on emergency services and intensive care wards, where COVID patients now take up 54% of beds nationwide.

France is now reporting more than 350 new cases per 100,000 people each week, and nearly 18% of its widespread tests are now coming back positive. It has reported Europe’s third-highest virus death toll, at more than 35,000 lives lost.

HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— The coronavirus is getting worse in states that Trump needs to win the most

— U.S. sees coronavirus deaths rising, just like the experts predicted

— European nations enact sweeping restrictions like curfews to try to slow surging infection rates

— In a year marked by fear and death, Americans wrestle with celebrating a holiday hinged on turning fear and death into fun

— World Series is being played at a neutral site in front of smallest crowds in a century, but Dodgers and Rays are just happy that some fans are there

— Follow AP’s coronavirus pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING:

MOSCOW — Russian authorities on Tuesday have issued a nationwide mask requirement amid a rapid resurgence of the coronavirus outbreak.

Health authorities registered 16,550 new cases and 320 new deaths on Tuesday, the highest daily death toll since the beginning of the pandemic.

Russia’s public health agency, Rospotrebnadzor, ordered all Russians to wear masks in crowded public spaces, on public transport, in taxis, at parking lots and in elevators starting on Wednesday. The agency also recommended regional authorities put a curfew on entertainment events, cafes, restaurants and bars from 11 p.m. to 6 a.m.

Russia has the world’s fourth largest tally of over 1.5 million confirmed coronavirus cases. The government’s coronavirus task force has been reporting over over 15,000 new infections every day since last Sunday, which is much higher than in the spring.

Russia has reported more than 26,000 virus-related deaths.

Despite the sharp spike in daily new infections, Russian authorities have repeatedly dismissed the idea of imposing a second national lockdown or shutting down businesses. Most virus-related restrictions were lifted during the summer.

BRUSSELS — Former Belgian Prime Minister Sophie Wilmes remained hospitalized in intensive care with COVID-19 but her condition is improving, her spokeswoman said Tuesday.

In a message to The Associated Press, Elke Pattyn said Wilmes “is getting better every day” although she will stay in intensive care

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LA Approves More Business Reopenings, Plans for Testing Expansion

LOS ANGELES, CA — As Los Angeles launches a rapid coronavirus testing program, the county approved more business reopenings Friday and continued to report high numbers of new cases — the result of a testing backlog that lead to days of underreporting.

In upcoming weeks, Los Angeles officials hope to have a new weapon in the region’s testing arsonal. Officials hope the use of widespread tests will lead to safer reopenings.

Los Angeles County announced 2,773 new COVID-19 cases Friday, along with 23 more deaths.

The county had reported unusually low daily case numbers earlier this week due to the unspecified technical problems. The issues began to resolve Thursday, when the county announced 3,600 new cases, the largest number since a surge that occurred after the Fourth of July holiday. County officials noted that about 2,000 of the cases reported Thursday were a result of the backlog.

Authorities warned residents to expect more backlogged test results to cause higher numbers of new cases reported in upcoming days.

The 2,773 cases announced by the county, along with 84 reported by Long Beach health officials and 25 by Pasadena, lifted the countywide cumulative total from throughout the pandemic to 296,930.The county also announced 23 coronavirus-related deaths on Friday, raising the death toll to 6,974.

A total of 769 people were hospitalized in the county due to the virus as of Friday, down from 777 on Thursday but up from 758 on Wednesday, 730 on Tuesday, 722 on Monday and 752 on Sunday. Hospitalizations have remained below the 800 mark for several weeks, following post-July Fourth surges that saw more than 2,000 daily hospital cases.

The county on Friday also confirmed two new cases of a rare, coronavirus-related pediatric condition, known as multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children. The two new cases lifted the countywide total to 43, all of whom required hospitalization and half of whom were admitted to intensive care units. There have not been any deaths in the county due to MIS-C.

Two months after Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti announced a coordinated effort to establish wide-scale use of rapid, at-home COVID-19 tests, local health officials are poised to announce details of a pilot program next week that will employ an FDA-approved test and assess the feasibility of its widespread use.

“There’s a lot of work that goes into developing plans and implementing these sorts of studies, and we are very excited about the partnership with the city of L.A. and USC that we have made considerable progress over the last two months,” Dr. Paul Simon, chief science officer for the county Department of Public Health, told reporters in an online briefing Thursday.

“We will be having a press event next week to share an update on where we’re at and hope to begin implementing at least the first phase of these studies very quickly,” he said.

Garcetti announced in August a collaboration with nationwide medical experts, bioscience firms and government leaders in an effort to develop rapid, low-cost

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