Morale sags among British health workers, and other news from around the world.

As Britain is hit by a second wave of coronavirus infections and deaths, the country’s doctors and nurses are bracing for what is expected to be a deluge of new patients over the next six months. But this time, they say, the wave is coming without the same sense of caution among a coronavirus-weary public, nor with a clear government strategy to contain the virus and address rapidly filling intensive care units.

Politicians across the political spectrum in Britain largely accepted the need for the country’s first lockdown in the spring, and doctors limped through the crisis, fueled by adrenaline and the hope that the government could keep an eventual resurgence of cases from inundating the health service again.

That hope has not been realized. With 367 deaths and 22,885 confirmed cases on Tuesday alone, Britain has a second wave of infections that could test its overextended health service even more severely than the first did.

A decision by England’s health service to restore normal services has meant that there are fewer unoccupied hospital beds now than there were in the spring, and fewer doctors available to redeploy to coronavirus wards.

Making matters worse, hospitals are already receiving the usual wintertime stream of patients with influenza and other illnesses that can fill them above 95 percent of capacity even in a normal year.

“The first time around, it’s almost like a once-in-a-lifetime kind of medical challenge,” said Paul Whitaker, a respiratory doctor in Bradford, in northern England, where the number of coronavirus patients has returned to its early May peak.

“At the time, it felt like the thing to do, because it was unavoidable and we had to do our bit,” said Tom Lawton, an intensive care doctor in Bradford. “It was that kind of Blitz spirit. Whereas this time, it feels like this could have been avoided, and clearly it has been avoided in a number of countries.”

In other developments around the world:

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Brushing Teeth Is As Important as Washing Hands to Prevent Covid-19, Says British Dentist



Brushing Teeth Is As Important as Washing Hands to Prevent Covid-19, Says British Dentist


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Brushing Teeth Is As Important as Washing Hands to Prevent Covid-19, Says British Dentist

It seems face masks, hand sanitisers, and social distancing are not enough to prevent the spread of coronavirus according to a British dentist.

Dentistry Professor Martin Addy of the University of Bristol has called for toothbrushing to be considered equally important as hand washing. In an interview to British daily The Telegraph, professor explained that toothpaste contains the same detergents as those found in soap and hand wash soaps, which could help prevent the coronavirus from making itself into your mouth.

A report by Mirror quoted The Telegraph who interviewed the professor saying that the antimicrobial action of toothpaste in the mouth stays for three to five hours and, thereby would reduce the viral load in saliva or infection by viruses entering the mouth.

He further suggested that people should brush their teeth before going out and should increase the number of times they were brushing their teeth. He said the timing of tooth brushing should be focused when a person is about to go out of their homes into a public place.

The British professor is quite serious when it comes to brushing the teeth.

In April this year he even wrote a letter published in the British Dental Journal questioning the dental community why the profession has not been promoting oral hygiene, through toothbrushing, as a preventive approach to coronavirus.

As the World Health Organisation, governments across the world urged citizens to wash their hands frequently Professor Addy said that the general recommendation to toothbrush with toothpaste for two minutes twice a day should be reinforced by the dental profession, the media and the government and its advisors.

He said that it should not be assumed that such oral hygiene practices are already the norm, especially for those individuals who coincidentally are most at risk of contracting Covid-19.

Even though there has been no research which proves how exactly tooth brushing prevents the virus it should be followed as a part of basic hygiene nonetheless.

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Watch Gymnasts Try Challenges From U.S. and British Military Fitness Tests

British Olympic gymnast Nile Wilson is taking a challenge that YouTubers and athletes alike love to try: military physical fitness tests. There’s an entire genre of fit guys testing their mettle with the physical trials members of the forces must pass—from British bodybuilder Obi Vincent trying the Marine Corps Fitness Test, MattDoesFitness attempting the U.S. Air Force’s Physical Fitness Test, and Olympic runners Nick Symmonds and Ryan Hall taking on the Marine Corps Fitness Test.



a man jumping in the air: British Olympic gymnast Nile Wilson tries out moves from military fitness tests in a gymnasium, including pullups, situps, pushups, and an assault course.


© Nile Wilson – YouTube
British Olympic gymnast Nile Wilson tries out moves from military fitness tests in a gymnasium, including pullups, situps, pushups, and an assault course.



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But Wilson isn’t interested in one specific military outfit’s protocol. For his challenge, Wilson plans to take on a custom challenge comprised of pullups, pushups and situps, all common events in the genre. To fit the theme, Wilson and his friends don faux-camouflage fatigues and wear dog tags (the face paint they apply might just be a step to far).

Wilson sets out a goal number of reps for each exercise:

Chinups: 23

Situps: 70

Pushups: 40

“We’ll see how far we can push the boundaries today,” says Wilson.

Wilson gets to his chinups, and he knocks out 25 reps without dropping.

Next up is situps, which he plans to do for 2 minutes. But he comes up short with only 66.

“Ahhhhh!” he says as he struggles through his last reps. “We’re putting ourselves through hell and high water.”

Finally, he hits the pushups, which will be until he fatigues.

“I’ll be really happy with 87,” he says.

He grabs a yoga block to put under his chest to tap for each rep. He gets to it, and he manages to get to 61 pushups before collapsing. He’s not close to his goal, but it’s a solid effort nonetheless.

In place of the 1.5 mile run standard with military fitness tests, Wilson decides to do an assault course in the gymnasium instead. The challenge uses the gymnastics rings, crawling underneath gym mats, scaling a wall, flips on a trampoline, walking across balance beams, and uneven bars. He completes it in 1:25. That might be more like a military obstacle course than a fitness test—but we’ll give him credit for the effort.

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