OKC Dentist Working With On-Site Lab to Bring Patients Best in Cosmetic Dentistry

OKLAHOMA CITY, Dec. 2, 2020 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ — Providing the highest quality, longest lasting and most honest dentistry available has been a commitment of OKC dentist Dr. Chris Saxon’s since he began practicing dentistry. He is keeping this commitment by providing his patients with an on-site dental lab. This allows Dr. Saxon and his team at Saxon Dentistry to work hand in hand with the lab specialists to ensure an outstanding level of quality and service.

The Saxon Dentistry Difference

In most practices, the standard procedure is to outsource your dental lab needs. These typically include dentures, dental crowns, porcelain veneers, implant restorations and more. While convenient and often less expensive for dentists, quality and precision are often compromised. With Saxon Dentistry, this is kept on-site, ensuring greater quality control, accuracy of fit and most importantly, higher patient satisfaction.

When patients embark on full smile makeovers, dental implants, porcelain veneers and even a single crown, they are putting a lot of trust in their dentist. This trust is not taken lightly at Saxon Dentistry. The on-site lab utilizes top tier dental materials, advanced technology and employs skilled, meticulous technicians. Combining this with Dr. Saxon’s expertise allows for predictable, high quality outcomes.

When teaming up with the on-site dental lab specialist, Dr. Saxon can bring them directly into the room with the patient and together listen to the patient’s concerns. Without an on-site lab, dentists have to relay information to their labs via phone call or email. Details get lost in translation, and details matter greatly when customizing a smile for patients. Sometimes the most minor adjustment can have the biggest impact.

Smile Makeovers OKC

Dr. Saxon has a particular passion for making dentistry beautiful and natural. His keen eye for detail can make any dental restoration, from a single cracked tooth repair to dental veneers to full mouth dental implants, blend seamlessly into a smile. This has made him a highly sought after OKC cosmetic dentist and implant dentist.

“When dentistry is done to the highest level, no one should be able to detect that you’ve had dental work completed.”

He believes in meeting patients exactly where they are in life, understanding their goals and setting forth the appropriate treatment from there. There is no one size fits all dentistry in his office. Personalized care is not only necessary; it’s what every patient deserves that walks through a dentist’s door.

Get to Know Oklahoma City Native, Dr. Chris Saxon

Dr. Saxon is a native of Oklahoma City and a graduate of Putnam City North high school. He received his doctorate from the University of Oklahoma College Of Dentistry. He takes between 100-150 hours of continuing education every year, far exceeding the Oklahoma Board of Dentistry’s requirements.

Dr. Saxon is committed to giving back to the local community. One way he does this is by being an Oklahoma Mission of Mercy participant. Dr. Saxon is an avid golfer, cyclist and kite boarder, but his greatest joy comes from spending time with

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Helping Alzheimer’s Patients Bring Back Memories

People of all ages have moments when it feels like we’re on the edge of recalling something but can’t quite do it—where we parked our car or left our phone, for example, or what name goes with that familiar face. It’s extremely frustrating in the moment, but for most of us, we can usually remember if we try. For patients with Alzheimer’s, Huntington’s and many other dementia-causing diseases, however, memory loss is much more profound.

Given the steady rise in the numbers of Alzheimer’s patients, in particular, the research community and pharmaceutical companies agree that the development of treatment strategies is critical, now more than ever. Yet despite decades of research, we are still trying to understand why these patients can’t remember—and trying to find some way we might be able to help.

But we may be closer to an answer.

A well-known feature of early Alzheimer’s is a difficulty remembering recent events. We’ve always assumed that there are two possible explanations: one is that these patients can’t store new information properly in the brain; the other is that their ability to recall stored information has been weakened. But maybe there’s another way to think about it. Consider a public library in which each book represents a memory. If the library doesn’t have the book you want, you’re out of luck. This would be like asking Alzheimer’s patients to remember something that hasn’t been stored in their brain in the first place.

Even if the library has the book, though, you still need several pieces of information to locate it—what floor it’s on, what rack, what row on the rack. If you were missing some of that information, you wouldn’t find it either. That corresponds to the second assumption about why people with Alzheimer’s can’t remember. Although most research has focused on ways of improving memory storage in Alzheimer’s, this has not led to led to treatments capable of improving recall.

On the other hand, scientific evidence in support of the “weakened memory recall” idea in Alzheimer’s has been difficult to obtain, which is why this possibility has received considerably less attention. But in a Nature paper published in 2016, our team investigated both memory storage and memory recall processes in an animal model of early Alzheimer’s disease. In clinical research, there is no simple method to distinguish between memory storage versus recall deficits in Alzheimer’s patients, because standard cognitive tests rely on the patient’s ability to verbally describe previous events.

To circumvent this issue, I developed an approach that allowed us to activate the neurons that store memory information, referred to as memory engrams, through optogenetics—that is, introducing a gene that is light sensitive into the memory engram cells of “Alzheimer’s” mice, then delivering blue light pulses to activate them—and measuring memory recall strength directly. To our surprise, we found comparable numbers of engram cells in normal healthy animals and Alzheimer’s animals, suggesting that the initial memory storage process is intact. Targeting the recall process in Alzheimer’s animals led

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