As U.S. COVID-19 Cases Break Records, Weekly Deaths Rise 3% | Top News

(Reuters) – The number of new COVID-19 cases in the United States hit another record high last week, rising 18% to more than 575,000, while deaths inched up 3%, according to a Reuters analysis of state and county reports.

The number of new cases reported each week has risen for four straight weeks, with the biggest increases seen in the last two weeks.

Nationally, nearly 5,800 people died of the virus in the seven days ended Nov. 1, bringing the total to over 230,000. Health experts say deaths tend to increase four to six weeks after a surge in infections.

(Open https://tmsnrt.rs/2WTOZDR in an external browser for state-by-state details)

Thirty-four out of 50 states have seen new cases increase for at least two weeks in a row, down from 36 the prior week. They include Florida, Ohio and Michigan — all hotly contested states for Tuesday’s U.S. presidential election. New cases rose 60% in Pennsylvania, another crucial state.

Texas reported the most new cases last week with over 45,600, followed by Illinois, which has half as many people, with over 44,500 new cases.

The United States performed 8.5 million COVID-19 tests last week, of which 6.8% came back positive for the new virus, compared with 6.3% the prior week, according to data from The COVID Tracking Project, a volunteer-run effort to track the outbreak.

South Dakota led the nation with the highest positive test rate at 50%, followed by Iowa at 44% and Wyoming at 43%. A total of 17 states had a positive test rate of over 10%.

The World Health Organization considers rates above 5% concerning because it suggests there are more cases in the community that have not yet been uncovered.

(Writing by Lisa Shumaker; Graphic by Chris Canipe; Editing by Tiffany Wu)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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The Latest: Cases Climb, Protests Break Out in Spain | World News

MADRID — Spain’s total number of COVID-19 infections has climbed to more than 1,240,000, but the government said Monday it won’t be introducing stricter lockdown conditions for now.

Over the weekend, a spate of violent protests in a dozen cities were held in response to a nightly curfew introduced last week in Spain. Mostly young protesters set fire to vehicles and trash cans, blocked roads and threw objects at riot police.

Spain’s Minister for Inclusion, Social Security and Migration, José Luis Escrivá told Antena 3 television Monday that “this kind of behavior is to be expected” as people grow weary of restrictions against the spread of COVID-19.

The Health Ministry reported just over 55,000 new cases in Spain since it last published official figures on Friday. More than 36,000 people have died in Spain since the pandemic began.

Asturias, a region on the north coast, asked the national government to order people in the province to stay at home for two weeks.

The Health Ministry refused, saying it is waiting to see the results of the central government’s latest restrictions, introduced last week. A strict lockdown from March to June brought down the number of cases but hit the economy hard.

HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— America stands at a crossroads the day before Election Day, facing a stark choice between candidates in the midst of historic pandemic

— U.S. hospitals are scrambling to hire more nurses as the coronavirus pandemic surges, leading to stiff competition and increased costs.

— Germany kicks off a partial lockdown, as several European countries tighten restrictions this week

— The BBC says Britain’s Prince William had the virus in April, around the same time as his father Prince Charles

— Follow AP’s coronavirus pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING:

GENEVA — A top World Health Organization scientist focusing on the coronavirus response says there has been no transmission or clusters at the agency’s Geneva headquarters.

Maria Van Kerkhove, the WHO’s technical lead on the COVID-19 pandemic, made the comments to reporters after the U.N. agency’s chief, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, announced that he was starting a self-quarantine after coming into contact with a person who tested positive for the virus.

“I am well and without symptoms, but will self quarantine in the coming days in line with WHO protocols,” Tedros said via video conference from his home during a regular WHO news conference on Monday.

Van Kerkhove said the agency was tracking all cases among staff and carrying out contact tracing to ensure that transmission wasn’t taking place at its Geneva headquarters.

“We haven’t had any transmission take place on the premises, and we have no clusters on the premises,” she said. “But it is something that we’re monitoring every day.”

O’FALLAN, Mo. — Missouri hospital leaders are raising alarms about bed capacity as coronavirus cases continue to spike, with some urging Gov. Mike Parson to issue a statewide mask mandate.

Meanwhile, an eastern

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Cases climb, protests break out in Spain

MADRID — Spain’s total number of COVID-19 infections has climbed to more than 1,240,000, but the government said Monday it won’t be introducing stricter lockdown conditions for now.

Over the weekend, a spate of violent protests in a dozen cities were held in response to a nightly curfew introduced last week in Spain. Mostly young protesters set fire to vehicles and trash cans, blocked roads and threw objects at riot police.

Spain’s Minister for Inclusion, Social Security and Migration, José Luis Escrivá told Antena 3 television Monday that “this kind of behavior is to be expected” as people grow weary of restrictions against the spread of COVID-19.


The Health Ministry reported just over 55,000 new cases in Spain since it last published official figures on Friday. More than 36,000 people have died in Spain since the pandemic began.

Asturias, a region on the north coast, asked the national government to order people in the province to stay at home for two weeks.

The Health Ministry refused, saying it is waiting to see the results of the central government’s latest restrictions, introduced last week. A strict lockdown from March to June brought down the number of cases but hit the economy hard.

___

HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— America stands at a crossroads the day before Election Day, facing a stark choice between candidates in the midst of historic pandemic

— U.S. hospitals are scrambling to hire more nurses as the coronavirus pandemic surges, leading to stiff competition and increased costs.

— Germany kicks off a partial lockdown, as several European countries tighten restrictions this week

— The BBC says Britain’s Prince William had the virus in April, around the same time as his father Prince Charles

___

— Follow AP’s coronavirus pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

___

HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING:

GENEVA — A top World Health Organization scientist focusing on the coronavirus response says there has been no transmission or clusters at the agency’s Geneva headquarters.

Maria Van Kerkhove, the WHO’s technical lead on the COVID-19 pandemic, made the comments to reporters after the U.N. agency’s chief, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, announced that he was starting a self-quarantine after coming into contact with a person who tested positive for the virus.

“I am well and without symptoms, but will self quarantine in the coming days in line with WHO protocols,” Tedros said via video conference from his home during a regular WHO news conference on Monday.

Van Kerkhove said the agency was tracking all cases among staff and carrying out contact tracing to ensure that transmission wasn’t taking place at its Geneva headquarters.

“We haven’t had any transmission take place on the premises, and we have no clusters on the premises,” she said. “But it is something that we’re monitoring every day.”

___

O’FALLAN, Mo. — Missouri hospital leaders are raising alarms about bed capacity as coronavirus cases continue to spike, with some urging Gov. Mike Parson to issue a statewide mask

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Hospital Traces COVID Cluster to Break Room

A COVID-19 cluster involving 15 staff members at Holyoke Medical Center in western Massachusetts probably started in a break room, the hospital’s chief executive said.

“We traced it back to employees eating a meal together in a break room, and obviously when you eat a meal you take your mask off, and they contracted it from one employee who was positive,” Holyoke CEO Spiro Hatiras told Western Mass News.

Hatiras said the hospital has since put capacity limits on break rooms.

The employees who became ill began to show symptoms two weeks ago. Of the 15 who tested positive, 10 worked exclusively in the emergency department, according to reports.

As of Monday, two staff members were cleared to return to work. The rest remain at home, according to the local news outlet. The hospital did not return a MedPage Today request for comment as to their various conditions.

Hatiras warned about “COVID fatigue,” even among hospital employees: “We want to make sure that people interpret the guidelines appropriately. What you find sometimes with this fatigue is that 6 feet sometimes becomes 5 feet, sometimes 4 feet.”

Holyoke Medical Center is located just north of Springfield, the third largest city in Massachusetts. The town of Holyoke recently scaled back to the first of its three-step pandemic reopening, according to a local television report, because the region has been hit by a resurgence of COVID-19 cases.

It is one of a few western Massachusetts communities considered high-risk, according to a state database, with 12.7 average daily cases per 100,000 people and a 2.5% positivity rate as of the end of last week.

Holyoke Medical Center has 1,200 employees and 198 beds, according to its website. It is part of Valley Health Systems but identifies itself as an independent community hospital.

  • Ryan Basen reports for MedPage’s enterprise & investigative team. He has worked as a journalist for more than a decade, earning national and state honors for his investigative work. He often writes about issues concerning the practice and business of medicine. Follow

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Fitness Instructor’s Tips For Working Out After a Break

how to come back from hiatus

I’ve worked out a lot in the past few months. In fact, you could say I was one of those people who fully embraced the at-home gym lifestyle. But as much as I thrived with my running challenges, online workout classes, and experimental workouts, even I needed a break.

Naturally, I encourage and support rest days, but for me this turned into a rest week. And then a rest month. I took so much time off that I found myself a little nervous to rejoin my favorite online workout class. As I’ve decided to dust off my favorite UA HOVR™ Machina Running Shoes ($150) and get to moving again, I’ve found myself a little more resistant than normal.

To help me get over that fear and offer up some tips for anyone like me who may have found themselves in a bit of a workout hiatus, I turned to one of the instructors I tune into most while working out at home, Peloton instructor Selena Samuela.

Samuela, who tackles everything from running to bootcamp, shared with me her top five tips for any athlete — no matter the level — for returning to an active lifestyle after a break.

All about timing

“Take your time and take the time to go back to basics,” said Samuela. In this instance, she emphasized the importance of focusing on form. “If [you’re] lifting, don’t let your ego get in the way,” she said. “It’s an easy way to hurt yourself jumping right back into where you left off. Instead, accept that you will need to build back up to it. That starts with form, good form will get you progressing faster and avoiding injuries.”

Think of the big picture

Be sure to focus on total work time rather than pace if you’re focusing on a cardio workout, explained Samuela. Although I’ve found myself frustrated that I’m not able to get my 5K pace as fast as it was in the spring, the important thing is that I’m getting out there and still able to run for 30 minutes. Like Samuela suggested, sometimes it’s important to focus on the bigger picture of the workout. Details like speed and pace are things you can always build back up.

Make it fun

“Do the things you enjoy the most first,” said Samuela. Whether that’s a certain sport like running, cycling, yoga, or lifting or it’s the social aspect of working out, finding what is fun to you about your workout is essential. If you prefer adding in a little social touch, Samuela suggested working out with a buddy or taking a virtual fitness class with a friend via an online platform like the Peloton App. As someone who has relied upon the fitness community more than ever before, I can attest that recruiting your friends for virtual workouts is a great way to stay accountable and excited for your workout.

Always warm up

According to Samuela, this is something you simply shouldn’t skip. “Make sure your

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Coronavirus cases break records as states around U.S. reel under surge

As the United States set records for the number of new coronavirus cases, states in every part of the country are reeling under the surge.

Two back-to-back daily records for single-day increases in U.S. cases were set on Friday, with 79,303 new cases, and on Thursday with 77,640, according to NBC News’ tally. The previous high of 75,723 was set July 29.

The total number of cases has reached 8.6 million, with over 225,000 deaths.

And the toll is being felt around the country.

  • Among the dead is an 18-year-old who was a student at University of Dayton in Ohio. “I think it is a wake-up call,” said a fellow student of the death of the teen, who had gone home to Illinois in September for remote study.

  • Illinois’ top public health official broke down in tears during a news conference Friday as she reported over 3,800 new coronavirus cases, bringing the state’s total to more than 370,000.

  • Ohio set another single-day case record after reporting 2,518 new cases Friday, bringing its total to 192,948, according to NBC News’ tally. “We can’t let this situation continue to domino out of control,” the governor said this week as the state put out a new ad with a visualization of how the virus spreads.

  • New Mexico has seen its cases double over the past two weeks to more than 40,000. “The threat of this virus remains very real”, the governor reminded residents.

  • South Dakota’s Pine Ridge Indian Reservation was put under a one-week lockdown by the Oglala Sioux Tribe to slow the spread of the virus.

  • Idaho is also experiencing an uptick in cases that is starting to overwhelm hospitals in the state. “Our hospital is not built for a pandemic,” said a pulmonologist at a hospital in Coeur d’Alene.

  • New Jersey’s governor said Saturday he extended a public health emergency in the state for an additional 30 days in light of an “alarming rise in cases,” the highest since May.

  • And the top health official in one of Florida’s most populous counties discouraged parents from hosting birthday parties for their children, no matter the size.

The University of Dayton student died Thursday after a lengthy hospitalization, the school’s president said in a letter to the university community, reported NBC affiliate WDTN in Dayton. The university didn’t say whether the student, who was in his first year, was believed to have contracted the virus at the school or elsewhere. He had left campus on Sept. 13 to study remotely from home.

In Illinois, the state’s top health official, Dr. Ngozi Ezike, became emotional at a news conference where she noted the increase in the case count and that over 9,400 people have died of the virus in the state. “These are people who started with us in 2020 and won’t be with us at the Thanksgiving table.”

“We are seeing the number of people with Covid-19 continue to increase,” Ezike said. “We are seeing the number of individuals in the

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Wales to Enter Two Week ‘Fire Break’ Lockdown to Curb Coronavirus Spread | Health News

Wales will enter a “fire break” lockdown for two weeks, requiring everyone to stay home in order to curb the spread of the coronavirus.

First Minister Mark Drakeford announced on Monday that beginning at 6 p.m. Friday, all non essential businesses, such as retail stores, restaurants and bars, will shut down until Nov. 9.

People will only be allowed to leave their homes for essential reasons, such as to obtain necessary supplies and health services, exercise alone, access childcare and education, attend court and visit banks. The only exception will be made for essential workers and people with jobs that make it impossible to work from home.

Between Oct. 10 and 16, Public Health Wales confirmed 3,870 new cases of the coronavirus. More than 800 people are hospitalized with COVID-19, a number that is 20% higher than just a week ago.

Officials report more than 35,620 cases of the virus in Wales and more than 1,700 people have died.

The rate of infection is currently 1.4, and the seven-day rolling incidence rate for Wales stands at more than 120 cases per 100,000 population, according to the government.

“The aim of a fire break is to reset the clock,” Drakeford said.

Non essential travel within Wales and into and out of Wales will not be allowed during the two-week fire break. Additionally, people are not permitted to visit other households or meet with people they do not live with. Secondary schools, which will be on a break period, will remain closed for an additional week, though primary schools and child care centers will remain open.

Libraries, gyms and places of worship will also be closed.

Cartoons on the Coronavirus

Face coverings continue to be mandatory in indoor public spaces that remain open and on public transportation and in taxis.

If people violate the new rules, they could face a fine up to $78 on the first offense and up to $156 on the second.

“A fire break period is our best chance of regaining control of the virus and avoiding a much longer and much more damaging national lockdown,” Drakeford said. “This is the moment to come together, to play our part in a common endeavour.”

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Cleveland Boil Water Advisory Issued After Water Main Break In Richmond Hill

Following a large transmission water main break on Saturday night in Richmond Hill, Cleveland has issued a boil water advisory for residents in several cities.

The Cleveland Water Department stated that the advisory was issued because disease-causing organisms may have entered the state’s water system in some Northeast suburbs as a result of the water main break.

Residents in Richmond Heights, Gates Mills, Lyndhurst, Highland Heights, South Euclid, Mayfield, and Mayfield Heights should expect to be under the advisory through Monday morning.

Locals are advised to refrain from drinking water without flushing and boiling it first. All tap water that is used for should be flushed out for at least three minutes. Water should be brought to a boil for at least one minute before it is removed from the stove to be cooled. Residents could also drink bottled water until the advisory has been lifted.

Ignoring the advisory could result in waterborne illness, which could include stomach discomfort and nausea. Those with severely compromised immune systems such as the elderly and infants may be at increased risk and should speak to health care providers before consuming water during the advisory.

Although there is a boil water advisory in effect, officials cannot confirm whether the state’s water supply has been tainted following the water main break.

“Cleveland Water has no evidence at this time that the water system is contaminated. The possibility, however, does exist that the water system is contaminated and is issuing this advisory as a precaution,” the press release stated.

A truck drives through floodwaters in Lake Charles, Louisiana on October 10, 2020 following Hurricane Delta A truck drives through floodwaters in Lake Charles, Louisiana on October 10, 2020 following Hurricane Delta Photo: AFP / CHANDAN KHANNA

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