SPORTS MEDICINE: Drew Brees poster boy for wreck of a football season | John Doherty

Name: Walter Payton

Best decade: 1970s

Nickname: Sweetness

Position: Running back

Seasons played with Bears: 13

Career Highlights: Walter Payton might be regarded as the greatest Chicago Bear of all time and one of the best to ever play, according to fans and media. 

Payton’s professional origin began in 1975 when the Bears selected him in the first round of the NFL Draft. He was the fourth overall pick.

The Bears hadn’t had a winning season or a great running back since Gale Sayers retired in 1972. Payton was a gift the Bears needed from the football gods. 

However, his rookie season showed otherwise. He finished with 679 yards and seven touchdowns, but led the league in yards per kickoff return.

Payton was ready to improve for the following season. 

In 1976, Payton rushed for 1,390 yards and scored 13 touchdowns. He played in the 1977 Pro Bowl and won the MVP award for the game. 

Payton’s early years of improving never stopped. In his 1977 season, Payton rushed for 1,852 yards and scored 16 touchdowns. He was the league’s leading scorer that season. 

On October 7, 1984 Payton broke the NFL’s career rushing record. 

In 1985 — the best year in the history of Chicago football — Payton rushed for more than 1,500 yards and helped the Bears get to Super Bowl XX. 

Mike Ditka, who coached the winning Super Bowl team, said that one of the biggest regrets he made in his life was not letting Payton score a touchdown in the game, using quarterback Jim McMahon and defensive tackle William Perry to run the ball instead.

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Qatar- Sidra Medicine saves life of young Kuwaiti boy with intractable epilepsy

(MENAFN – Gulf Times) * QF entity performs complex epilepsy surgery for first time on an international patient

Sidra Medicine, a Qatar Foundation (QF) entity, has performed a complex epilepsy surgery for the first time on an international patient.

Salem is a 10-year-old boy from Kuwait who used to suffer from at least 15-30 seizures a day. Each seizure could last from a few seconds to up to four minutes, increasing the danger to his physical health.

Salem was transferred to Sidra Medicine in Qatar, after his family in Kuwait sought a second expert opinion with the hospital’s renowned specialist treatment programme for children with intractable epilepsy.

Salem’s father, Dr Abdulrahman Abdullah, said: ‘Due to the nature of Salem’s epilepsy, we had to have someone monitoring him all the time as he would have an uncontrollable seizure any minute, with the added risk of hurting himself. And while he was on a good therapy programme, including anti-epileptic medications, in Kuwait, we had reached a stage where he was no longer responding to conventional treatment or medication.

‘Our decision to bring my son Salem to Sidra Medicine was based on several recommendations within the international and regional pediatric medical faculty. The specialist and advanced therapies that Sidra Medicine offers competes with centres of excellence that are in the US or Europe. My family and I are extremely impressed with the care our son received here, Salem’s father continued.

Dr Husam Kayyali, acting division chief of Neurology at Sidra Medicine, said: ‘Salem’s case was brought to our attention when his father reached out to our international office about saving his son’s life. Intractable epilepsy can be a heavy burden, especially on children as they need constant monitoring and care. Studies have shown that only 3-4% of patients with intractable epilepsy would respond to treatment with antiepileptic medications. Cutting-edge advanced therapies such as epilepsy surgery might be the only answer in such cases. After a thorough evaluation of Salem’s case at Sidra Medicine, we decided to proceed with epilepsy surgery.

Salem was cared for at Sidra Medicine by a multidisciplinary team of experts from neurology, neurophysiology, radiology, nuclear medicine, neuro-psychology and neurosurgery. He was also extensively supported by a wider team from occupational health, physical therapy, rehabilitative medicine and ophthalmology to ensure a comprehensive pre- and post-operative care programme, a press statement noted.

Sidra Medicine is “one of very few children’s hospitals in the Middle East” to have dedicated paediatric experts overseeing the entire spectrum of care for children with complex diseases or health challenges, including epilepsy, the statement points out.

‘Salem’s treatment programme at Sidra Medicine started with a thorough assessment and investigations at the Epilepsy Monitoring Unit with Video-Electroencephalographic monitoring and advanced neuroimaging such as high-resolution Brain MRI imaging and (positron emission tomography) PET scans. It was determined that Salem had suffered a stroke when he was a fetus inside his mother. This explained how he started getting refractory epileptic seizures when he turned five, which had progressively damaged the left

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Sidra Medicine saves life of young Kuwaiti boy with intractable epilepsy

* QF entity performs complex epilepsy surgery for first time on an international patient

Sidra Medicine, a Qatar Foundation (QF) entity, has performed a complex epilepsy surgery for the first time on an international patient.

Salem is a 10-year-old boy from Kuwait who used to suffer from at least 15-30 seizures a day. Each seizure could last from a few seconds to up to four minutes, increasing the danger to his physical health.

Salem was transferred to Sidra Medicine in Qatar, after his family in Kuwait sought a second expert opinion with the hospital’s renowned specialist treatment programme for children with intractable epilepsy.

Salem’s father, Dr Abdulrahman Abdullah, said: “Due to the nature of Salem’s epilepsy, we had to have someone monitoring him all the time as he would have an uncontrollable seizure any minute, with the added risk of hurting himself. And while he was on a good therapy programme, including anti-epileptic medications, in Kuwait, we had reached a stage where he was no longer responding to conventional treatment or medication.”

“Our decision to bring my son Salem to Sidra Medicine was based on several recommendations within the international and regional pediatric medical faculty. The specialist and advanced therapies that Sidra Medicine offers competes with centres of excellence that are in the US or Europe. My family and I are extremely impressed with the care our son received here,” Salem’s father continued.

Dr Husam Kayyali, acting division chief of Neurology at Sidra Medicine, said: “Salem’s case was brought to our attention when his father reached out to our international office about saving his son’s life. Intractable epilepsy can be a heavy burden, especially on children as they need constant monitoring and care. Studies have shown that only 3-4% of patients with intractable epilepsy would respond to treatment with antiepileptic medications. Cutting-edge advanced therapies such as epilepsy surgery might be the only answer in such cases. After a thorough evaluation of Salem’s case at Sidra Medicine, we decided to proceed with epilepsy surgery.”

Salem was cared for at Sidra Medicine by a multidisciplinary team of experts from neurology, neurophysiology, radiology, nuclear medicine, neuro-psychology and neurosurgery. He was also extensively supported by a wider team from occupational health, physical therapy, rehabilitative medicine and ophthalmology to ensure a comprehensive pre- and post-operative care programme, a press statement noted.

Sidra Medicine is “one of very few children’s hospitals in the Middle East” to have dedicated paediatric experts overseeing the entire spectrum of care for children with complex diseases or health challenges, including epilepsy, the statement points out.

“Salem’s treatment programme at Sidra Medicine started with a thorough assessment and investigations at the Epilepsy Monitoring Unit with Video-Electroencephalographic monitoring and advanced neuroimaging such as high-resolution Brain MRI imaging and (positron emission tomography) PET scans. It was determined that Salem had suffered a stroke when he was a fetus inside his mother. This explained how he started getting refractory epileptic seizures when he turned five, which had progressively damaged the left side of his brain,”

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2-year-old boy with rare disease dresses up as his doctor for Halloween

Dr. William Tse said he was “honored” by the costume.

Many 2-year-old boys want to dress up as Superman or Spiderman for Halloween, but Jonah Bump decided to dress up as a different type of superhero – his doctor.

Jonah was diagnosed with a rare immune deficiency disorder, severe combined immunodeficiency disease, when he was very young. Because of this, Dr. William Tse, the director of pediatric stem cell transplantation at Norton Children’s Cancer Institute in Louisville, Kentucky, performed a stem cell transplant on Jonah when he was just 7 months old.

Because he did not have a functioning immune system, Jonah needed to be isolated in a room at the hospital. His mother, Laurie Bump, says for the most part Tse and hospital staff were the only people they were allowed to see.

“The doctors and nurses became like extended family to us,” Bump said. “Dr. Tse went out of his way to do things for me just out of kindness. Our family has a soft spot for Dr. Tse because of everything he’s done for us and the way he cares about Jonah and our family.”

Dr. Tse says Jonah was one of his very first patients when he started working at the hospital in Louisville two and a half years ago. After Jonah’s surgery, he continues to see the toddler every three to six months to check up on him.

“Every time I see him I’m amazed by well he’s doing,” Tse said. “I feel proud. I feel happy and grateful that together (with his family) we can help Jonah to become a healthy child.”

Bump says she recently bought her son a doctor kit to play with, and when Halloween came around, she thought it’d be the perfect idea to have her son dress up as someone who means so much to their family.

“It seemed like a good fit,” Bump said. “Everyone in our family has been Jonah’s patient and because of what Dr. Tse means to us we decided to combine the two.”

Bump dressed up Jonah exactly like Tse, including a white coat and Tse’s signature blue Oxford shirt he wears underneath the coat. They even replicated Tse’s hospital name tag to say “Tse Jr.”

When the costume was complete, she texted the picture to one of Tse’s transplant nurses and asked her to relay it to him. When Tse saw it, he said he was honored.

“He was like a mini-me,” Tse said. “I was touched. I was so surprised and I didn’t expect it. The costume looked like me down to the very last detail.”

Tse jokes that in 20 years he

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13-year-old boy becomes Missouri’s youngest COVID-19 death

An eighth-grade student in Missouri who died over the weekend after contracting COVID-19 is reportedly the state’s youngest death from the coronavirus outbreak.

NBC affiliate KMOV reported that Peyton Baumgarth, a Franklin County resident, is now the first person under the age of 18 to die from COVID-19 in the state.

“We extend our heartfelt sympathy to the family,” an email to students and parents from the staff of Washington Middle School read, according to KMOV. “The family also asks that we all remember to wear masks, wash hands frequently and follow guidelines. COVID-19 is real and they want to remind students and parents to take these precautions in and outside of school.”

“Because we know this will impact our school community emotionally, we encourage you to be especially sensitive and prepare to offer support to your child during this difficult time,” it reportedly continued.

Nearly 17,000 Missouri residents under the age of 18 have contracted coronavirus so far, according to KMOV. The state has recorded just over 192,000 total infections since the pandemic began, including nearly 3,000 on Friday, a record for the state.

Just over 3,000 Missourians have died from complications resulting from the virus.

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Race Against Time for Boy Battling Rare, Alzheimer’s-like Illness | Health News

By Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

MONDAY, Nov. 2, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Connor Dobbyn is an energetic and loving 12-year-old, but he’s fading away every second.

Connor has Sanfilippo syndrome, a genetic brain disorder in children that experts compare to Alzheimer’s disease.

The boy already has lost some of what he’s learned in his short time on Earth, and every day he loses a little more.

“We’re on borrowed time. They don’t live through their teens,” said his mom, Marisa DiChiacchio, who lives with Connor in West Chester, Pa. “We have six years left, at most.”

Here’s the good news: Researchers think they’ve found a cure for Connor’s type of Sanfilippo, a therapy that replaces the bad gene in his body with a healthy working version.

But they need millions of dollars in funding to test this potential cure. Connor’s parents have set up a GoFundMe page with a goal of $3 million for a clinical trial that could save their son’s life.

“The research is done. It’s like right there, but they need the money to fund the clinical trial,” DiChiacchio explained.

Kids with Sanfilippo syndrome suffer from the build-up of a long-chain sugar molecule called heparan sulfate, which is normally used by the body to build cartilage, connective tissues, nerve tissues and skin, according to the Nemours Foundation.

These kids have a defect in one of the genes that make enzymes needed to break down heparan sulfate. Without those enzymes, heparan sulfate “builds up everywhere in the body and the brain,” explained Cara O’Neill, chief science officer and co-founder of the Cure Sanfilippo Foundation.

As the substance clogs the brain and body, kids begin experiencing the sort of mental and physical decline associated with dementia in seniors. Kids lose knowledge and skills they’ve gained, develop seizures, experience hearing and vision loss, find it difficult to walk and move, and even struggle to chew and swallow food, O’Neill said.

“These kids become nonverbal. They lose their ability to walk and talk. They’re in wheelchairs and in strollers. Almost all of them develop seizures and different movement disorders,” DiChiacchio said. “There’s literally no cure at this point. These kids are dying.”

Sanfilippo syndrome is relatively rare, occurring in about 1 out of every 70,000 children, O’Neill said.

“We think it’s underdiagnosed because it’s usually masked as autism,” said Glenn O’Neill, president and co-founder of the Cure Sanfilippo Foundation. “Kids exhibit the typical symptoms of autism early in life while parents are trying to figure out what’s going on. But then things actually begin actually going backwards, in the wrong direction.”

That’s what happened with Connor. He’d been struggling with developmental delays since he was 1 year old, and at age 5 he received a diagnosis of autism, DiChiacchio said.

But during a psychological evaluation in the third grade, educators were stunned to find a drastic decline in Connor’s IQ, his mom said.

“It was like a bomb went off,” DiChiacchio said. “His average IQ in kindergarten was 100, and

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Chrissy Teigen Breaks Her Silence Following the Tragic Loss of Her Baby Boy

Earlier this month, Chrissy Teigen and her husband, John Legend, shared the devastating news that they’d lost their baby boy, Jack, at around 20 weeks due to complications with his placenta. Throughout her pregnancy Chrissy had been posting regular updates online, detailing the complications she was unfortunately facing.



Chrissy Teigen posing for the camera: Chrissy Teigen has broken her silence following the tragic loss of her baby boy, Jack, in a new moving blog post. She addresses those who questioned her photos


© Daniele Venturelli – Getty Images
Chrissy Teigen has broken her silence following the tragic loss of her baby boy, Jack, in a new moving blog post. She addresses those who questioned her photos

When Jack tragically passed, the brave couple also chose to share their grief with the world alongside a series of intimate photos, taken while in hospital. Baby loss awareness charity, Tommy’s, said this can be an important part of the grieving process for parents (in response to trolls leaving cruel messages on Chrissy’s social media accounts). Following that, Chrissy has been relatively quiet online, bar telling fans she and John are ‘quiet but okay’.

Now, the model, cookbook author and presenter has spoken in greater depth about what she’s been going through in a moving blog post. It begins with her thanking everybody for their kind words during this intensely difficult time, and for sharing their own stories too. She adds that notes beginning with ‘You don’t have to respond to this’ were helpful, as she felt quite overwhelmed (but appreciative) of the support.



graphical user interface, text, application: Chrissy's Brave Blog about Losing Her Baby Boy


Chrissy’s Brave Blog about Losing Her Baby Boy

Speaking about the moment she was told by doctors that her third child would not survive to full term, Chrissy wrote on Medium: ‘After a couple nights at the hospital, my doctor told me exactly what I knew was coming — it was time to say goodbye. He [Jack] just wouldn’t survive this, and if it went on any longer, I might not either. We had tried bags and bags of blood transfusions, every single one going right through me like we hadn’t done anything at all. Late one night, I was told it would be time to let go in the morning.’

Addressing the people who (bafflingly) went out of their way to write nasty messages underneath her personal photos, Chrissy said that John was reluctant to capture their pain at first, but that she knew she ‘needed to know of this moment forever, the same way I needed to remember us kissing at the end of the aisle, the same way I needed to remember our tears of joy after Luna and Miles. And I absolutely knew I needed to share this story.’



a close up of a person talking on a cell phone: Chrissy's Brave Blog about Losing Her Baby Boy


© Chrissy Teigen – Instagram
Chrissy’s Brave Blog about Losing Her Baby Boy

Showing an amazing amount of strength, she added, ‘I cannot express how little I care that you hate the photos. How little I care that it’s something you wouldn’t have done. I lived it, I chose to do it, and more than anything, these photos aren’t for anyone but the people who have lived this or are curious enough to wonder what something like this is like.

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AHA News: Boy With ‘Half a Heart’ Gets Lifesaving Transplant | Health News

(HealthDay)

American Heart Association News

THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2020 (American Heart Association News) — Wendy Wees suffered a miscarriage during her first pregnancy with husband, Jason Protiva, so they were overjoyed when they passed the nine-week mark of her second pregnancy.

At her 20-week appointment, the couple found out they were having a boy. The doctor noticed something else on the sonogram. Their unborn son had a serious heart defect.

Further tests determined he would be born with essentially half a heart. He had hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), a condition where the heart’s left side is underdeveloped. Doctors said he would need three surgeries before age 5, the first performed days after birth.

The couple decided to name their boy “something really strong and meaningful” and chose Abel Falcon. They also chose to focus on the positive, happy they had insurance and there was something they could do for Abel.

“We were trying to think the best and started looking at all the survivors and how this one woman is 30 years old with HLHS,” Wendy said. “We knew that transplant was the end game, but those three surgeries are supposed to allow that to not be necessary until later on in life.”

Abel arrived with normal color, not the blue or grey skin tone they were told he might appear. Before his first surgery at 6 days old, each of his parents were able to hold him skin-to-skin.

“That’s when it all really hit us,” Wendy said. “This is serious. If he survives, it’s going to be a miracle.”

The couple took Abel home after 29 days. They spent a month monitoring his oxygen saturation levels, taking his temperature, recording his feedings, weighing his diapers and administering several oral medications.

“He didn’t sleep well, but he was a baby. And he fussed, but he was a baby. We didn’t think there was anything wrong with him,” Wendy said. “But when we went back for his one-month checkup, they told us he was in heart failure.”

Doctors readmitted Abel to the hospital, but he was too small and weak to endure the next surgery. All the family could do was wait. They camped out on an upper floor and took shifts staying with Abel.

One night, Jason had 3-month-old Abel dancing in his bed. Jason dozed off thinking all was well.

“I woke up to him really laboring to breathe and called the nurse in, and within minutes he coded,” Jason said. “The doctor came in and started doing chest compressions, and it was just chaos.”

They continued CPR for 15 minutes before Abel’s heart surgeon, who had just finished an operation, came in. With no operating rooms available, he placed Abel on maximum life support right there in his hospital room.

The family was told Abel would have to come off the heart-lung machine before he could be listed for a transplant. It took eight days, but Abel was finally weaned off. Almost a month later, he received

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Parents of Boy with Brain Disorder That’s ‘100 Percent Fatal’ Raise Money for Gene Therapy Clinical Trial

gofundme Connor

The parents of a boy with a rare, fatal brain disorder are raising money so he can participate in a gene therapy trial that has potential to stop the disease.

Marisa DiChiacchio and Mike Dobbyn’s 12-year-old son Connor has Sanfilippo Syndrome Type C, which is a rare degenerative brain disorder that is “like Alzheimer’s, but in children,” according to a GoFundMe campaign created earlier this month.

According to the campaign, the syndrome is “100 percent fatal” and has no cure.

“As the degeneration rapidly progresses, Connor will stop walking, stop talking, stop being able to feed himself,” the GoFundMe campaign says. “He’ll develop movement disorders and seizures, suffer severe dementia, endure a lot of pain and suffering, and then he’ll die.”

But Connor’s family is raising money for the Cure Sanfilippo Foundation and a gene therapy clinical trial that needs funding at UT Southwestern in Dallas, Texas.

gofundme Marisa DiChiacchio, Mike Dobbyn and their sons Keenan and Connor

RELATED: Louisiana Couple Welcomes Second Set of Identical Twins: ‘God Has a Real Funny Sense of Humor’

“Research for this gene therapy has shown in pre-clinical models that it can stop the disease,” the campaign says. “This clinical trial is the crucial step of determining whether earlier research is able to show the same therapeutic benefits in children.”

“It was like a bomb was dropped on us in the geneticist office,” Connor’s dad told CBS Philadelphia of the moment they learned of his diagnosis. “I just remember it was a life-shortening condition, the geneticist actually told us at the time, ‘Don’t Google this yet because we don’t have a 100 percent conviction on this diagnosis yet.’ “

gofundme Marisa DiChiacchio, Mike Dobbyn, Connor

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“We knew Connor obviously was special and loved and adored by so many people, but sometimes you just don’t realize until something devastating like this comes out,” Connor’s mother added. “And just everybody comes out of the woodwork trying to help and wanting to help. So he’s like our local community rock star.”

As of Wednesday, the campaign had raised $172,210 of its $3,000,000 goal. 

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