Compass Health Building Communities of Hope Gala Raises More Than $165,000 to Benefit Child, Youth and Family Behavioral Health Services

The virtual event, held on World Mental Health Day, brought together community members and honored client voices and stories

Compass Health’s Building Communities of Hope Gala raised more than $165,000 in support of the organization’s child, youth and family behavioral health services during a virtual event held on World Mental Health Day, Saturday, October 10, 2020.

Funds exceeded Compass Health’s goals by $15,000, as more than 250 community members gathered virtually to celebrate client voices and stories, even forming socially distant “watch parties” while the event was streamed online. Organizers attribute the support, in part, to a greater recognition of the need for behavioral health resources as the community faces the impacts of COVID-19.

“We know that this year has been demanding in many ways – in fact, the pandemic has exacerbated the medical, educational, economic and social challenges that many of our families face – making community support more crucial than ever,” said Tom Sebastian, president and CEO of Compass Health. “It was thrilling and gratifying to see our community come together, and to watch our team innovate to create a meaningful shared experience while keeping everyone safe through a virtual format.”

One of the evening’s highlights included a video presentation led by Amanda, a Compass Health team member, and her son, who was a client of Compass Health’s WISe youth wraparound services. The video revealed that Amanda was so inspired by the treatment and care that her son received, that she joined the organization as a parent partner with WISe almost two years ago. During the video, Amanda and her son also shared how Compass Health has helped them navigate changes and develop important communication and coping skills.

“It was amazing to see the impact of sharing our story,” Amanda said. “As a parent partner, I know how important it is to destigmatize mental health, and the response to the video has been overwhelming. I’m particularly proud of my son, who really wanted to share with others that they’re not alone, and that Compass Health has been such a positive force in his life.”

Presented in part by Kaiser Permanente, First Interstate Bank, Genoa Healthcare and Integrated Telehealth Solutions, this year’s fundraiser benefits Compass Heath’s child, youth and family services. The primary beneficiaries are Compass Health’s Child and Family Outpatient Programs, Children’s Intensive Services / Wraparound with Intensive Services (WISe), Camp Outside the Box, Camp Mariposa, Child Advocacy Program (CAP), and Compass Health’s Therapeutic Foster Care Program.

The robust list of programs supported by this year’s Gala exemplifies the range of services offered by the 118-year-old organization. With a focus on providing a full spectrum of accessible care, Compass Health’s child, family and youth programs are designed to promote positive changes in behavior, help the child and family learn appropriate coping skills, and improve communication skills including learning to resolve conflict and manage emotions in a healthy manner. In addition to honoring the family voice and choice, clinical services such as the Child Advocacy Program offer

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CV Benefit of Eicosapentaenoic Acid Seen at All eGFR Levels

Daily icosapent ethyl (Vascepa) safely and effectively reduces fatal and nonfatal ischemic events in patients with reduced kidney function, a prespecified analysis of the REDUCE-IT RENAL study shows.

“Some cardiovascular drugs are not as effective in kidney disease patients,” said investigator Deepak Bhatt, MD, MPH, from Brigham and Women’s Hospital Heart and Vascular Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston.

“So we looked at patients according to their eGFR — in particular, patients with an eGFR of less than 60 mL/min per 1.73 m² — because we wanted to make sure the drug was as safe in those patients as it was in others and that they weren’t having any more side effects than others,” he told Medscape Medical News.

Icosapent ethyl, a highly purified prescription formulation of the omega-3 oil eicosapentaenoic acid, has been shown to lower triglycerides and have anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and plaque-stabilizing properties.

In the original phase 3 Reduction of Cardiovascular Events With Icosapent Ethyl – Intervention Trial (REDUCE-IT), 8179 patients with cardiovascular (CV) disease or diabetes and one additional CV risk factor were randomized to treatment with icosapent ethyl 4 g a day or placebo. Patients had to have a fasting triglyceride level between 150 and 500 mg/dL to be eligible for study enrollment, and a low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) level between 41 and 100 mg/dL.

The primary end point was a composite of CV death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, coronary revascularization, and unstable angina. The key secondary end point was a combination of CV death, MI, and stroke.

At a mean follow-up of 4.9 years, there was a 25% relative risk reduction and a 4.8% absolute risk reduction in the primary composite end point in the REDUCE-IT study, as previously reported by Medscape Medical News,

For the REDUCE-IT RENAL study, REDUCE-IT patients were categorized into three prespecified eGFR categories: less than 60 mL/min per 1.73 m²; 60 to less than 90 mL/min per 1.73 m², and at least 90 mL/min per 1.73 m².

In the cohort of 8179 study participants, the median baseline eGFR was 75 mL/min per 1.73 m² (range, 17 to 123 mL/min per 1.73 m²) and the mean LDL was around 70 mg/dL.



Arjun Majithia

CV event rates were higher in patients in the lowest eGFR category — less than 60 mL/min per 1.73 m² — than in the other categories. With icosapent ethyl, reductions in the primary and secondary end points were greater in the lowest category, although relative risk reductions were similar in the three categories, investigator Arjun Majithia, MD, also from Brigham and Women’s Hospital, reported during his presentation at Kidney Week 2020.

Risk for Events With Icosapent Ethyl by Baseline eGFR Category
eGFR (mL/min per 1.73 m²) Relative Risk, % Absolute Risk, % Number Needed to Treat P Value
Primary end point (composite of CV death, nonfatal MI, nonfatal stroke, coronary revascularization, unstable angina)
<60 mL –29 –7.1 14 .0002
60 to <90 –20 –3.8 27 .001
≥90 –30 –4.8 21 .003
Secondary end point (combination of CV death, MI,
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Don’t Give up on COVID-19 Plasma, Experts Say, After Study Finds No Benefit | Top News

LONDON (Reuters) – Researchers called on Friday for more research into using blood from recovered COVID-19 patients – or so-called convalescent plasma – as a potential treatment, after a small trial of hospitalised patients in India found it was of no benefit

The Indian results, published in the BMJ British Medical Journal, found that the plasma, which delivers antibodies from COVID-19 survivors to infected people, did not help hospitalised patients fight off the infection, and failed to reduce death rates or halt progression to severe disease.

The findings are a setback for a potential therapy that U.S. President Donald Trump touted in August as a “historic breakthrough”, and one experts say has been used in some 100,000 patients in the United States already, despite limited evidence on its efficacy.

Scientists not directly involved in the India study, which involved around 460 patients, said its results were disappointing but should not mean doctors give up hope altogether on convalescent plasma.

They said further and larger trials are needed, including in COVID-19 patients with milder disease and those newly infected.

“With just a few hundred patients, (the India trial) is still much too small to give clear results,” said Martin Landray, a professor of medicine and epidemiology at Britain’s Oxford University.

“One could well imagine that the treatment might work particularly well in those earlier in the course of the disease or who have not been able to mount a good antibody response to the virus of their own,” he said. “But such speculation needs to be tested – we can’t just rely on an educated guess.”

While the United States and India have authorised convalescent plasma for emergency use, other countries, including Britain, are collecting donated plasma so that the treatment could be widely rolled out if it is shown to be effective.

The Indian researchers enrolled 464 adults with COVID-19 who were admitted to hospitals across India between April and July. They were randomly split into two groups – with one receiving two transfusions of convalescent plasma alongside best standard care, and the other getting best standard care only.

After seven days, use of convalescent plasma seemed to improve some symptoms, such as shortness of breath and fatigue, and led to higher rates of so-called negative conversion – a sign that the virus is being neutralised by antibodies.

But this did not translate into a reduction in deaths or progression to severe disease by 28 days.

Ian Jones, a Reading University professor of virology, agreed with Landray that plasma may be more likely to work very soon after someone contracts COVID-19.

He urged these and other researchers to continue to conduct trials, and to do so in newly diagnosed patients.

“We still do not have enough treatments for the early stage of disease to prevent severe disease and until this becomes an option, avoiding being infected with the virus remains the key message,” he said.

(Reporting by Kate Kelland; Editing by Peter Graff and Frances Kerry)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters

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‘Modest’ Benefit for Post-MI Flash Glucose Monitoring in T2D

Following a heart attack, there appears to be a “modest” benefit of using flash glucose monitoring over fingerstick testing to monitor blood glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes being treated with insulin or a sulfonylurea, according to investigators of the LIBERATES trial.

The results showed a nonsignificant increase in the time that subjects’ blood glucose was spent in the target range of 3.9-10.00 mmol/L (70-180 mg/dL) 3 months after experiencing an acute coronary syndrome (ACS).
At best, flash monitoring using Abbott’s Freestyle Libre system was associated with an increase in time spent in range (TIR) of 17-28 or 48 minutes per day over self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG), depending on the type of statistical analysis used. There was no difference in glycated hemoglobin A1c levels between the two groups, but there was a trend for less time spent in hypoglycemia in the flash monitoring arm.

Viewers Underwhelmed

“My overall impression is that the effects were less pronounced than anticipated,” Kare Birkeland, MD, PhD, a specialist in internal medicine and endocrinology at Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Norway, observed after the findings were presented at the virtual annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes.

Others who had watched the live session seemed similarly underwhelmed by the findings, with one viewer questioning the value of devoting an hour-and-a-half session to the phase 2 trial.

However, the session chair Simon Heller, BA, MB, BChir, DM, professor of clinical diabetes at the University of Sheffield, and trial coinvestigator, defended the detailed look at the trial’s findings, noting that it was worthwhile to present the data from the trial as it “really helps explain why we do phase 2 and phase 3 trials.”

Strong Rationale for Monitoring Post-MI

There is a strong rationale for ensuring that blood glucose is well controlled in type 2 diabetes patients who have experienced a myocardial infarction, observed Robert Storey, BSc, BM, DM, professor of cardiology at the University of Sheffield. One way to do that potentially is through improved glucose monitoring.

“There’s clearly a close link between diabetes and the risk of MI: Both high and low HbA1c are associated with adverse outcome, and high and low glucose levels following MI are also associated with adverse outcome,” he observed, noting also that hypoglycemia was not given enough attention in post-ACS patients.

“The hypothesis of the LIBERATES study was that a modern glycemic monitoring strategy can optimize blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetes patients following MI with the potential to reduce mortality and morbidity and improve quality of life,” Storey said. “The main research question of LIBERATES says, ‘Do new approaches in glucose monitoring increase the time in range and reduce hypoglycemia?’ ”

Pragmatic Trial Design

LIBERATES was a prospective, multicenter, parallel group, randomized controlled trial, explained the study’s statistician Deborah Stocken, PhD, professor of clinical trials research at the University of Leeds. There was “limited ability to blind the interventions,” so it was an open-label design.

“The patient population in LIBERATES was kept

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Curbing COVID Brought Unexpected Benefit for Asthma Patients | Health News

By Robert Preidt, HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Measures enacted to slow the spread of the new coronavirus also appeared to reduce hospitalizations for asthma, a new study finds.

Researchers compared weekly data on hospitalizations at 272 hospitals in Japan in the first five months of 2020 to the same period in 2017, 2018 and 2019.

Asthma hospitalizations in 2017-19 and 2020 showed similar trends until week eight, but in 2020 hospitalizations began to decline in week nine, the study found.

Hospitalizations for COVID-19 were first recorded during week seven of 2020. Further analysis found a significant decrease in the average number of asthma hospitalizations during weeks nine to 22 of this year compared to 2017-19.

The findings were published Oct. 13 in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice.

“Asthma hospitalizations usually indicate that an individual’s asthma is not currently under control,” corresponding author Dr. Atsushi Miyawaki, of the University of Tokyo, said in a journal news release. “This would suggest that asthma control improved during the pandemic. It illustrates the importance of environmental factors when it comes to treating and managing patients with asthma.”

One possible explanation is that increased hygiene to prevent COVID-19 would also reduce exposure to asthma triggers, according to the researchers. Enhanced precautions — such as frequent cleaning and reduced smoking — by people concerned that COVID-19 may trigger asthma may also have helped reduce triggers.

Other possible explanations include people being more likely to use preventative asthma medications, and community COVID-19 prevention measures helping reduce other respiratory infections, which can cause worsen asthma.

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more on asthma.

Copyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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Sentinel Uptake Wildly Variable, Brain Benefit Hazy

Use of the Sentinel (Boston Scientific) embolic protection device is highly variable and its ability to limit cerebral injury modest at best, a TVT Registry study suggests.

The primary analysis, using an instrumental variable approach, showed no significant reduction in in-hospital or 30-day stroke with the device among more than 120,000 transcatheter aortic valve replacements (TAVRs) performed in the United States since its approval.

“Nevertheless, the secondary propensity-weighted analysis and the confidence interval for the primary analysis are consistent with a possible modest relative risk reduction in stroke of about 20% and a number-needed-to-treat of about 300 to prevent one stroke,” David J. Cohen, MD, University of Missouri Kansas City School of Medicine.

“These findings support clinical equipoise and provide a strong rationale for ongoing large-scale randomized trials to test whether embolic protection devices provide meaningful clinical benefit,” he said during a late-breaking trial session at TCT Connect, the virtual meeting of Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) 2020.

Stroke continues to occur in 2% to 5% of patients undergoing TAVR, however, embolic protection devices (EPDs) have only been tested in small randomized trials using primary imaging endpoints, Cohen observed. “Thus, there remains considerable uncertainty regarding the clinical benefits associated with these devices.”

The study included 123,186 elective or urgent transfemoral TAVR procedures between January 2018 and December 2019 in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons/American College of Cardiology TVT Registry. Of these, 12,409 were performed with an EPD and 110,777 were not. Sites performing less than 20 TAVRs/year and emergent, alternative access, or concurrent mitral/TAVR procedures were excluded.

The proportion of hospitals using EPD rose steadily from 7% in the first quarter of 2018 to 28% in the fourth quarter of 2019. The proportion of patients receiving the device increased from 5% to 13% over the same period.

Usage varied widely, with 66% of hospitals never using an EPD over the study period and only 5% using it more than 50% of the time, Cohen observed. “By Q4 2019, this had increased to 8% but was still an extreme minority of hospitals in the United States.”

In the instrumental variable analysis, the adjusted rate of the primary endpoint of in-hospital stroke was in 1.39% in patients treated with EPD and 1.54% in those with no EPD (relative risk [RR], 0.90; 95% CI, 0.68 – 1.13; P = .41).

Rates were also similar for in-hospital death or stroke (2.4% vs 2.6%), major bleeding (4.0% vs 4.4%), device success (97% vs 97.2%), 30-day stroke (2.0% vs 2.1%), and 30-day mortality (1.9% vs 2.2%).

In the propensity-weighted analysis, which accounted for 30 demographic, clinical, and hospital-level characteristics, however, in-hospital stroke occurred in 1.30% of patients with EPD and 1.58% without (RR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.69 – 0.97; P = .02).

Significant differences were also observed in in-hospital death or stroke (2.1% vs 2.5%) and 30-day stroke (1.9% vs 2.2%) as well as mortality (1.7% vs 2.2%).

Accounting for Patient/Site Differences

EPD was more likely to be used in patients with bicuspid valves (6.8%), and less

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Peloton Set to Benefit from Structural Shift in Fitness Industry, Says 5-Star Analyst

The fitness industry has changed, and Peloton (PTON) stands to reap the benefits. Truist Securities’ Youssef Squali recently surveyed 1,500 consumers to gain insights on exercise habits and related preferences, with the findings only reaffirming the analyst’s confidence in PTON.

Throughout most of the U.S., gyms have reopened, but consumers aren’t hitting the locker room. Still nervous about going back to fitness centers, only 45% of respondents have been to a gym or an exercise class since the onset of the pandemic. Additionally, 33% are visiting the gym less frequently than before COVID-19.

Going forward, most survey participants noted that their longer-term exercise plans will incorporate a larger at-home component. Nearly 60% of gym-goers plan to cancel at least one gym membership as a result of COVID, including 33% who have already done so, while 55% plan to exercise at home more often even if a vaccine is widely-available.

Calling the number of gym-goers that have already canceled at least one membership “striking,” Squali thinks it could “portend greater pressure for gyms ahead.”

Expounding on this, the analyst stated, “This also suggests that the shift towards at-home fitness is likely to continue into 2021 and beyond. We believe many gym-goers, when faced with the reality of not being able to visit their fitness centers for an indefinite amount of time, have experienced and warmed to the benefits of working out from home (convenience, cost, time savings, etc.). We anticipate that this dynamic will outlive COVID.” To this end, Squali sees this trend as a tailwind for PTON.

Of the 1,169 respondents who worked out at least once a month, 54% made a fitness equipment or services related purchase for home use. It should be noted that out of this group, 40% had no plans to make an at-home fitness-related purchase before the pandemic.

“We believe this is a trend that helped drive better than expected earnings these last few quarters for Peloton. This also supports Peloton’s thesis that its serviceable addressable market (SAM) has expanded beyond its initial 14 million estimate to 20 million, as consumers who may not have considered purchasing at-home equipment previously are now a growing base of customers… With a very strong NPS, expanding product line and geographies, and continued brand marketing pushes, we believe that the TAM/SAM opportunities are likely to continue to expand over time,” Squali explained.

What’s more, Peloton was cited as the top brand that consumers would buy. “This speaks to the strength of the Peloton brand among younger, less affluent consumers, and runs contrary to the thesis held by some that that Peloton remains an exclusive brand and therefore targeting a niche segment (see page 3/4 for figures),” in Squali’s opinion.

As bikes are gaining share in the at-home exercise equipment market and PTON’s lower-priced products are attracting major interest, Squali remains on board this fitness train.

Accordingly, Squali reiterated a Buy rating. He also bumped up the price target from $115 to $144. This target puts

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How Does Complementary and Alternative Medicine Benefit Autism Spectrum Disorder?

Autism is a disorder that responds best to treatment that is holistic and addresses all aspects of the condition. Recent research has shown a benefit for what is considered complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) or integrative medicine that focuses on pairing natural treatment approaches with behavioral therapies and treatments. This approach facilitates a more balanced treatment plan as it allows families, like yours, to treat the child with autism as just that – a child affected by autism.

Autism is diagnosed based on criteria from a diagnostic manual of mental disorders however, it is precisely clear that many of these symptoms are medical – not psychological.

Common medical problems in children on the autism spectrum can include:
• Digestive problems: reflux, diarrhea, constipation, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic pain, bloated abdomen
• Seizures
• Allergies, asthma, and eczema
• Food reactions
• Sleep problems
• Infections
• Poor nutrition
• Poor growth

Children with autistic-spectrum disorder have health issues that are very complex. This is the reason that the approach to help these children requires a wide variety of diagnostic tests to scientifically assess the cause of their health issues.

No two individuals experience autism in the same way, and individuals do not respond to the same treatments. This is the reason it is of utmost importance that each child with autism spectrum disorder be evaluated individually.

This is the reason that the approach to help these children requires a wide variety of diagnostic tests to scientifically assess the cause of their health issues. Tests that involve gastrointestinal functioning, allergens: both food and environmental, nutritional needs and toxin levels are paramount to identifying the causes of their symptoms and embarking on a plan to improve health. A plan may involve some or all of the following: dietary changes, use of herbal, homeopathic and nutritional supplements, as well as natural and complimentary medicines as needed to support healing and improve their health and functioning.

Much of this information is not well recognized by most of the medical community and so what is available is found in books or online. This can leave parents feeling frustrated as knowing what to do first, how to prioritize therapies, dietary changes and what supplements to use is subjective without the proper testing.

Diet is an important component for children on the Autism spectrum.

The "Autism Diet" has been around for many years and has helped many children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) improve their health, and functioning. Research shows that 91% of autistic children improved when following the autism diet. According to the Autism Research Institute, nutritional treatments show great success in autism treatment. They suggest an autism diet of avoiding yeast, glutens, casein, and any allergens.

Since 91% of children with autism spectrum disorder improve on the autism diet, this is something that parents can implement without the consult of a doctor or health care professional.

To help implement this diet here is a list of the top 10 foods to eat or avoid according …

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