Women’s Sexual Medicine Expert, Dr. Adrienne Lara, Joins Exclusive Haute Beauty Network

Dr. Adrienne Lara joins exclusive Haute Beauty Network as a Women’s Sexual Medicine expert representing the Los Angeles market.

OXNARD, Calif. (PRWEB) December 01, 2020

At Celebrating Women Center in Oxnard, California, Dr. Adrienne Lara, MD, wants her patients to know that she went to medical school for you. She believes good patient care is collaborative and involves both the patient and doctor working together as a team to get to the same goal — patient wellness. Dr. Lara takes the time to listen to her patients to better understand who they are, so she’s not treating symptoms, but the whole patient, including their mind, body, and spirit.

Voted favorite MedSpa by the Ventura County Reporter and Best Med Spa Readers’ Choice County Star 2018, Celebrating Women Center offers a number of health and wellness treatments focused on regenerative medicine that allows patients’ natural beauty to shine through, including micro-needling, platelet-rich plasma (PRP), and vaginal rejuvenation with advanced medical treatments such as laser therapy and surgical procedures.

After beginning her career in health care as a nurse, Dr. Lara then went to medical school at Boston University School of Medicine and completed her internship and residency program in obstetrics and gynecology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, which is part of Harvard Medical School.

Dr. Lara takes great pride in her community and believes as a doctor it’s her role to teach and share her knowledge so that her patients understand that they have options. Her integrity and authenticity when it comes to health care are why she’s so loved by all who see her.

Dr. Lara is fluent in English and Spanish to serve patients from a variety of backgrounds.

Learn more about Dr. Adrienne Lara by visiting: https://hauteliving.com/hautebeauty/member/dr-adrienne-lara/

ABOUT HAUTE BEAUTY NETWORK:

Haute Beauty is affiliated with the luxury lifestyle publication Haute Living. As a section of Haute Living magazine, Haute Beauty covers the latest advancements in beauty and wellness, providing readers with expert advice on aesthetic and reconstructive treatments through its network of acclaimed doctors and beauty experts.

For more about Haute Beauty, visit https://hauteliving.com/hautebeauty/

For the original version on PRWeb visit: https://www.prweb.com/releases/women_s_sexual_medicine_expert_dr_adrienne_lara_joins_exclusive_haute_beauty_network/prweb17528982.htm

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Love Island’s Molly-Mae Hague leaves dentist as quest for natural beauty continues

Molly-Mae Hague was spotted leaving the dentist on Friday as she continued on her quest for more natural beauty.

The 21-year-old former Love Island star looked sensational as she wrapped up in an elegant designer outfit shortly after her appointment at Ruh Dental in Manchester.

The blonde bomshell – who is dating her Love Island beau Tommy Fury – opted for a chic cream overcoat and an enormous Balenciaga scarf to keep her warm against the blustery weather.

She also finished her look off with a pair of chunky statement trainers and light blue denim jeans.

Molly completed the outfit with a black leather bag as she walked away from the cosmetic dentist office.

Molly-Mae Hague was spotted leaving a dentist clinic in Manchester

The reality star slicked her hair back into a gorgeous French plait and added a slick of natural make up to finish off her ensemble.

It has been speculated in the past that Molly-Mae may have had veneers fitted to achieve her pearly whites, however it is unclear whether she had any procedures during her visit this week.

Molly’s latest trip to the dentist came shortly after the star revealed she was trying to ‘reverse’ some of her dramatic beauty procedures.

The reality star looked sensational in her winter outfit

Molly paired a smart cream coat with a fluffy Balenciaga scarf

Last month, the television star revealed she that had filler dissolved in her lips after admitting she may have gone ‘too far’.

Molly also captured the entire process on video and shared the details with her loyal YouTube following.

The Love Island star has since revealed to fans that she does ‘not miss’ her old lips, and was touched by all the messages she had received from fans.

Molly-Mae recently had her lip fillers removed

“You guys have been so nice about my new lips, you can’t really see because I’ve got so much lip liner on,” she said on social media.

“But yeah, I’m just trying to get use to them.

She continued: “I do not miss my lumpy, bumpy horrible filler!

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Why We Need to Stop Linking Beauty and Success With ‘Fair’ Skin

From depictions of ‘suitable’ marriage partners in Netflix series Indian Matchmaking to the on-going popularity of skin-lightening creams, colourism remains rife in certain communities. Here, writer Ayesha Muttucumaru details her complicated relationship with the word ‘fair’ – and why calling out shade bias is vital.



From Indian Matchmaking to the popularity of skin lightening creams, colourism is still rife. Here's why we need to about skin lightening creams


© Provided by Women’s Health UK
From Indian Matchmaking to the popularity of skin lightening creams, colourism is still rife. Here’s why we need to about skin lightening creams

They dropped the F-Bomb.’ From the moment my mum and I started watching Indian Matchmaking on Netflix, we felt it would only be a matter of time until the word that makes us wince like no other was uttered. The term in question? No, not a four lettered expletive, but something far more insidious. ‘Fair.’



a woman smiling for the camera: The author


The author

As you might know, the docu-series follows ‘Mumbai’s top matchmaker,’ Sima Taparia, as she helps a range of single people in India and the US, with the help of their families, find their future wife or husband. The format has proven divisive. Criticisms levied by certain members of the Indian diaspora on Twitter include that some of the show’s participants engage in caste-discrimintion, mostly using euphemistic terms (‘from a good family’, ‘similar backgrounds’), as well as colourism (a prejudice or discrimination towards those with dark skin that usually occurs within the same ethnic group).

The latter is seen when some participants request a match with ‘fair’ skin. As well as affecting those with darker complexions in south Asian communities, it should be noted that attitudes such as these can lead people down a dangerous road to anti-Blackness.

These statements, some said, go unchallenged by Taparia, which could lead to the normalisation or affirmation of such views. (Speaking to The Cut, Smriti Mundhra, the show’s executive producer, said that she welcomes critique: ‘We’re now at a point where we can actually hold representation to a higher standard and push for better and more nuanced stories. I want to be held accountable. Push me so I can push too.’)

Why the word ‘fair’ is problematic

As to why the word ‘fair’ is an issue? Short story: it is not just seen as a way to denote someone’s appearance, but a character trait, having become synonymous with a person’s place in society, their chances of professional success, status and self-worth. The connotations go far beyond the superficial.

Sounds archaic, right? However, seeing one US-based show contestant casually list: ‘not too dark’ and ‘fair skin’ as a preferred ‘want’ in a potential parter was a stark reminder that colourism seems to be very much alive and kicking, even in my millennial generation.

The history of colourism in south Asian communities

Colonialism and the caste system are two of the reasons attributed to enduring colourist attitudes, as is the way skin colour is portrayed in the film industry, the media and by beauty brands. One notable example is the ‘fairness’ cream Fair & Lovely whose advertisements in India have historically implied that

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On International Pronouns Day, transgender women talk inner strength, outer beauty

Wednesday marked the third annual International Pronouns Day, which is meant to educate and raise awareness about the importance of respecting personal pronouns.

This day, and the push to make asking and using other people’s personal pronouns commonplace, spotlights an issue that particularly affects the transgender and gender nonconforming communities, experts have said.

Two transgender women and a Northwell Health surgeon spoke at a livestreamed event organized by the hospital on Wednesday about some of the issues facing the transgender community.

Rubi Lacroix, 25, of Babylon, who grew up in Gramercy Park, and Demi Washington, 28, a South Carolina native who now lives in Brooklyn, underwent facial feminization surgery and spoke about their experiences alongside Dr. James Bradley.

The operations last seven hours or so as chins and jaws are softened, noses and brows re-sculpted and hairlines lowered, experts said.

“I have a softer face now,” Washington said. “It is easier for people to see me as a woman.”

Said Lacroix, on her way to becoming an X-ray technician and then a nurse: “It was really tough; I had to do this.”

About one half of transgender boys attempted suicide in their teens; for girls the rate was nearly one-third and for nonbinary individuals, whose identities fall outside of the gender binary, the figure was just under 42%, an October 2018 American Academy of Pediatrics study found.

“This is not about hair and makeup … this is a life-changing procedure not easily recovered from,” Washington said.

During the recovery, said Washington, “There is a lot of time to think about what it means to have the exterior features of a woman. This doesn’t erase anybody’s strife — now, all of a sudden you’re thoroughly deemed a sexual being. Now I’m reduced to the exterior, the woman you happen to see.”

“You have to be very strong to (handle) the transitions,” Washington added.

Crimes against transgender individuals appear to be on the rise by some measures, though they likely are quite undercounted because people are wary of how they will be treated — and some are not out.

Two years ago, 10 hate crimes against transgender individuals or their property were reported in New York State, down from 14 in 2017, Division of Criminal Justice Services statistics show. There were 18 such hate crimes in 2016, and one in 2014 and 2015.

For nonbinary individuals, who may prefer to be addressed with plural pronouns instead of as “he” or “she,” there were four hate crimes reported in 2018, zero in 2017, and five in 2016. Two were tracked in 2015, three in 2014.

Like many transgender individuals, Lacroix knew early on that her body did not match who she was on the inside.

“I think this is the best decision I ever made in my life,” she said. “Now, people

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Bride-To-Be Dies During Liposuction Surgery On Arms At Unlicensed Beauty Salon

A woman died after undergoing a liposuction surgery at an unlicensed beauty salon in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, on Saturday.

The woman, identified as 23-year-old Coco Siew Zhi Shing, was planning to get a liposuction surgery on her arms in preparation for her 2021 wedding with her fiancé in South Africa. While browsing the internet, the deceased found the beauty salon and decided to get the procedure done.

On Saturday afternoon, Shing arrived at the clinic along with a friend. She was administered with anesthesia and taken for the surgery. Half an hour later, the woman’s friend noticed that the surgeon was facing some difficulty during the surgery.

She immediately called an ambulance. On the way to the hospital, the medical staff realized that Shing’s heart had stopped and attempted to revive her. However, she was pronounced dead at the hospital.

Speaking to World of Buzz, Shing’s brother said he rushed to the hospital after being notified about the incident by her friend. However, she had died by the time he arrived at the hospital. The unidentified brother went on to say that the person in charge of the beauty clinic came to the hospital almost three hours after the woman died and also confessed that they did not have the license to perform any liposuction procedure.

“Under our repeated questioning, the person in charge of the beauty salon revealed that they did not have an aesthetic clinic license. They were only operating under an ordinary beauty salon license and the doctor who performed the surgery on my sister did not have a professional aesthetic medical license,” he told the outlet.

He told China Press that the surgeon hadn’t admitted to her mistake and was yet to apologize.

A police case has been filed and the investigators are waiting for the autopsy results to determine the cause of death.

Malaysian Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (MSPRS) issued a warning, asking people to do a background check before deciding to undergo the procedure. 

“They may disguise themselves as ‘medical doctors’ or use fancy medical terms to entice their clients to do the procedures. They often offer a remarkably lower price compared to a licensed medical clinic/hospital. Higher complication rates and even death have been reported in these unlicensed practices. It is crucial to check on the invasiveness, risk involved, premise license, and service provider qualification before undergoing any aesthetic procedure. If in doubt, please contact the relevant authorities for confirmation,” the organization said in a statement. 

Meanwhile, Shing’s friend, Ke Xin, took to Facebook to pay tribute to her.

“We met each other when we were 13 years old in Zun Kong Independent High School. At that time, you were very tall and was always the talk of the whole school no matter where you went. When you decided to get married next year, I was really happy and excited for you. I told myself that this important person in my life is about to embark on a new journey and

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