Cuomo, other leaders say federal vaccine plan shortchanges minority areas

The federal plan to roll out a COVID-19 vaccine is woefully inadequate and will shortchange communities of color, said Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo, Attorney General Letitia James and leaders of two prominent national civil rights organizations Sunday.

“COVID has revealed from the very beginning the underlying injustice and inequity in this society,” Cuomo said during a teleconference with reporters where he also gave an update on the state’s ongoing effort to tamp down the coronavirus.

The governor was joined by on the call by James, National Urban League President and Chief Executive Officer Marc Morial and NAACP President and Chief Executive Officer Derrick Johnson.

James pointed out that while the federal government has given pharmaceutical companies billions of dollars to help develop vaccines for COVID-19, very little has been set aside to help states administer the vaccine when it becomes available.

Statistics show COVID-19 infection and death rates have been higher among communities of color for a myriad reasons, including poor access to health care, according the leaders on the call.

The federal plan to distribute vaccine relies on chain pharmacies and other sites where flu shots are currently available.

“You might see big chain pharmacies … every other block in communities in Manhattan but let’s be clear,” James said, “the neighborhoods where more of our communities of color live do now do not have this type of access and that’s the core of the federal plan.”

Morial and Johnson both said the federal government needs to explore the use of other sites for vaccinations, such as schools and community centers.

There were 2,255 new COVID-19 cases reported statewide Saturday including 141 in Nassau and 142 in Suffolk, according to statistics released by the state.

New York’s overall COVID-19 positivity rate is 1.5%, Cuomo said. In the red zones, neighborhoods with high infection rates, the positivity rate is 3.1%.

Across the state, 17 people died from COVID-19, including one person in Nassau and another in Suffolk, Cuomo said. There are 1,125 COVID-19 patients in hospitals statewide including 125 in intensive care units.

Cuomo said only less-densely populated Maine and Vermont have lower COVID-19 rates than New York.

“New Yorkers should be very proud of that,” he said. “We expect an increase in the fall but it’s managing the increase which is what this is all about.”

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As the coronavirus surges, it is reaching into the nation’s last untouched areas

Then came October. Three residents tested positive, knocking Petroleum off zero-case lists, forcing the county’s lone school to close for a week and proving, as Sheriff Bill Cassell put it, that “eventually we were going to get it,” and that the virus “ain’t gone yet.”

That is a lesson people in many other wide-open places have been learning as the coronavirus surges anew. Months after it raced in successive waves along the nation’s coasts and through the Sun Belt, it is reaching deep into its final frontier — the most sparsely populated states and counties, where distance from others has long been part of the appeal and this year had appeared to be a buffer against a deadly communicable disease.

In Montana, which boasts just seven people per square mile, active cases have more than doubled since the start of the month, and officials are warning of crisis-level hospitalization rates and strains on rural health care. In Wyoming, which ranks 49th in population density, the National Guard has been deployed to help with contact tracing. Those two states, along with the low-density states of Idaho, North Dakota and South Dakota, now have some of the nation’s highest per capita caseloads. Even Alaska, the least-crowded state, is logging unprecedented increases, including in rural villages.

“People here make the joke that we’ve been socially isolating since before the state was founded,” said Christine M. Porter, an associate professor of public health at the University of Wyoming. “In terms of the reason this happened now and it didn’t happen before, it was essentially luck-slash-geography. It’s a disease that spreads exponentially once it’s taken root, unless you take severe measures to stop it.”

The bulk of these states’ cases are clustered in their relatively small cities, but infections are fanning out. In Montana, about 55 percent of cases were in population centers by mid-month, down from nearly 80 percent over the summer. And although the caseloads may look low, they loom large for local public health officials and facilities.

Sue Woods directs the Central Montana Health District, a Massachusetts-sized area that includes Petroleum and five other rural counties. The district has about 120 active cases, and Woods is working 10- to 12-hour days, mostly on contact tracing.

“The numbers of cases that we see are so small compared to large population centers, but when you take our population into account, we’re right in the same percentages,” Woods said. “Two of us are doing the bulk of the patient contacts. It is overwhelming.”

Some officials point to the positive side of being hit by the coronavirus later in the pandemic. It gave jurisdictions and health-care facilities the opportunity, they say, to collect personal protective equipment, ramp up testing and learn more about the virus and how to treat covid-19, the disease it causes.

“Up until a few weeks ago, we had been very successful in limiting transmission,” said Alexia Harrist, Wyoming’s state health officer and state epidemiologist. “It did buy us very important time to

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It’s ‘no surprise’ we’re seeing coronavirus surge in Republican areas, ER doctor explains

Despite the fact that there are nearly 8 million cases of coronavirus in the U.S., the pandemic is still heavily politicized in the country. 

President Trump largely eschews mask wearing and falsely claimed during a town hall this week that “85% of the people wearing masks catch” Covid-19 despite becoming infected and sick himself. And amid the president’s behavior on a national stage, Republican-leaning areas of the U.S. are now experiencing a surge in coronavirus cases. 

“To the extent that public health measures have become politicized, it really should be no surprise that we see that the spread of the disease also runs along political lines,” Dr. Steven McDonald, a New York-based emergency medicine physician, said on Yahoo Finance’s The Ticker (video above). “When you have a Republican president telling Republican supporters that mask wearing is not necessary, even after he’s had coronavirus from a maskless event, it’s no surprise that we see surges in Republican areas.”

Data compiled by web developer Dan Goodspeed shows just how badly Republican-leaning areas have been hit in the last four months as compared to Democratic-leaning states:

Coronavirus cases in the U.S. since June. (Dan Goodspeed/New York Times data)
Coronavirus cases in the U.S. since June. (Dan Goodspeed/New York Times data)

‘The rise in the death rate will be soon to follow’

Coronavirus initially spread quickly on the American West coast and the Northeast, with New York City becoming the global epicenter for a time, before transmission declined rapidly after governors implemented statewide mask mandates and stay-at-home orders.

The South experienced its own wave of cases after governors lifted restrictions early into the pandemic, and transmission remains troublingly high in that region. In recent months, coronavirus spread as moved across the Midwest. Now, states in the West including Wyoming, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Idaho are seeing their own spikes in cases amid lax social distancing policies.

“The concern there is that these are geographies that don’t have the same density of hospitals and doctors as you do in the Northeast or the metropolitan South or California,” he said. “New York was completely overwhelmed — but at the same time, we have many many hospitals in the New York City metropolitan area. That’s really not the case where the disease is now surging and so, that means that critical patients have fewer critical beds that they can be slotted to. That makes me very nervous.”

There are over 7.9 million cases in the U.S. (Graphic: David Foster/Yahoo Finance)
There are over 7.9 million cases in the U.S. (Graphic: David Foster/Yahoo Finance)

North Dakota and South Dakota currently have the most confirmed cases per capita among U.S. states, according to data from the New York Times. South Dakota’s governor, Kristi Noem, a Republican and staunch Trump supporter, declined to impose any mask mandate or business restrictions within her state. She’s also attributed the surge in cases to increased testing, although that doesn’t account for the surge in hospitalizations her state is also experiencing. 

“People are acknowledging that the hospitalization rate is increasing,” McDonald said. “First you see the rise in cases, then the rise in hospitalizations, then the

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Here Are 6 Different Areas of Specialization in the Field of Dentistry

Making the decision to study dentistry is commendable. At the right time during your studies, you will need to make a decision about the area in which you desire to specialize. Your area of ​​specialization will depend on where have a keen interest and a clear passion.

There are several areas of specialization in the career of dentistry. Some of these are mentioned below.

  1. General dentistry

You can choose to be a general practitioner in dentistry. These are dentists who are more of family doctors and they attend to uncomplicated conditions in their patients. These include simple cleaning, filling, repairing of cracked teeth, teeth whitening, and other such procedures that have no complications. They also advise their patients on good oral hygiene.

  1. Oral and maxillofacial surgery

The dentists who specialize in this particular area deal mainly with the tissues around the mouth area. This includes the tongue, cheek, gums and soft tissues in the face area. This type of dentist will do surgery for various reasons such as to prepare the gums to hold false teeth. Oral and maxillofacial surgeons also do complicated surgeries like cleft lip surgeries and reconstructive procedures on the jaw.

  1. Orthodontist

This is another area of ​​specialization in dentistry. The main job of this type of dentist is to install braces and correct teeth that are not properly aligned. They also put in mouth guards and headgear to rectify areas where jaw or facial development needs to be corrected. The support that they put in helps the teeth to grow well.

  1. Prosthodontist

These are dentists who specialize in replacing missing or decayed teeth. They deal with appliances like dentures, veneers, crowns, and bridges for cosmetic purposes. They also make sure that the teeth function well and are good for biting. Prosthodontists help to restore the patient's smile and they ensure that the oral prostheses are customized to fit each client well.

  1. Endodontist

These are dentists who specialize in handling the inner sensitive part of the tooth called the pulp. The pulp is protected by the outer enamel but it can become decayed or damaged. There are times when the pulp can be retained if it is not badly decayed. In cases where it is beyond preservation, the endodontist will perform a root canal as treatment.

  1. Periodontist

Those in this area of ​​dentistry mainly specialize in gums. They help to protect the gum against disease and inflammation. However, if an infection of the gum occurs, then they treat the disease. They also put in dental implants and perform skin grafting on the gums for cosmetic purposes.

Being a dentist demands a lot of sacrifice and commitment. You should select an area of ​​specialization that you are passionate about. This will ensure that you do an excellent job of attending to the specific needs of your clients.

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