Fauci rips White House coronavirus approach

Dr. Anthony FauciAnthony FauciRegeneron halts trial of COVID-19 antibody drug in sickest hospitalized patients The Hill’s 12:30 Report – Presented by Facebook – Pollsters stir debate over Trump numbers Donald Trump Jr. claims US coronavirus death rate at ‘almost nothing’ MORE, the nation’s leading disease expert, took aim at the White House’s handling of the coronavirus outbreak as the country has seen a spike in cases as it approaches winter, saying “it’s not a good situation.”

“We’re in for a whole lot of hurt. It’s not a good situation,” Fauci, a member of the White House coronavirus task force, told The Washington Post in an interview this weekend. Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said “all the stars are aligned in the wrong place as you go into the fall and winter season, with people congregating at home indoors.”

“You could not possibly be positioned more poorly,” he continued.

In a broad interview with the paper, Fauci warned of the country reaching a point where it could see over 100,000 coronavirus cases recorded daily if it does not reverse course quickly when it comes to public health practices. His comments came shortly after the country recorded a surge in COVID-19 infections last week, as multiple states have been reporting record number of cases in recent weeks. 

Fauci said in the interview that Democratic presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenPoll: Trump leads Biden by 7 points in Iowa Biden campaign cancels event in Texas after pro-Trump cars surrounded its bus Obama shooting three pointer while campaigning for Biden goes viral MORE’s campaign “is taking it seriously from a public health perspective,” while President TrumpDonald John TrumpPoll: Trump leads Biden by 7 points in Iowa Biden campaign cancels event in Texas after pro-Trump cars surrounded its bus Obama shooting three pointer while campaigning for Biden goes viral MORE is “looking at it from a different perspective” by focusing on “the economy and reopening the country.”

He also said that the coronavirus task force has been having fewer meetings, despite rising cases in the country and that “the public health aspect of the task force has diminished greatly.”

Fauci told the paper that the president not as accessible to him and White House coronavirus response coordinator Deborah BirxDeborah BirxThe Hill’s 12:30 Report – Presented by Facebook – Pollsters stir debate over Trump numbers The Hill’s Morning Report – Presented by Facebook – Trump, Biden set for weekend swing state sprint Kushner told Woodward in April Trump was ‘getting the country back from the doctors’ MORE as he once was. Fauci said the last time he and the president spoke was around the start of October. 

“The last time I spoke to the president was not about any policy; it was when he was recovering in Walter Reed, he called me up,” Fauci told the paper.

“All of a sudden, they didn’t like what the message was because it wasn’t what they wanted to

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Dr. Anthony Fauci unleashes on White House coronavirus approach days before election

As President Donald Trump fights his way through the final days of the presidential campaign denying the pandemic — by lashing out at doctors, disputing science and slashing the press for highlighting rising coronavirus case counts — the long-running rift between the White House and Dr. Anthony Fauci burst into the open Saturday night.



Anthony S. Fauci wearing a suit and tie: WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 17: (L-R) U.S. President Donald Trump, joined by members of the Coronavirus Task Force, speaks as National Institute Of Allergy And Infectious Diseases Director Dr. Anthony Fauci looks on during a press conference about the coronavirus outbreak in the press briefing room at the White House on March 17, 2020 in Washington, DC. The Trump administration is considering an $850 billion stimulus package to counter the economic fallout as the coronavirus spreads. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)


© Drew Angerer/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC – MARCH 17: (L-R) U.S. President Donald Trump, joined by members of the Coronavirus Task Force, speaks as National Institute Of Allergy And Infectious Diseases Director Dr. Anthony Fauci looks on during a press conference about the coronavirus outbreak in the press briefing room at the White House on March 17, 2020 in Washington, DC. The Trump administration is considering an $850 billion stimulus package to counter the economic fallout as the coronavirus spreads. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

For months as Trump undercut his own medical experts, sidelined scientists and refused to take basic steps to control the virus while mocking former Vice President Joe Biden for wearing a mask, the nation’s top infectious disease specialist held his tongue and took the President’s attacks in stride as he continued to plead with the American people to socially distance and wear masks.

But Fauci’s restraint appeared to have evaporated in a Washington Post interview that was published Saturday night, in which he called out the White House for allowing its strategy for fighting the virus to be shaped in part by a neuroradiologist with no training in the field of infectious disease and said he appreciated chief of staff Mark Meadows’ honesty when he admitted to CNN’s Jake Tapper during a recent interview that the administration has given up controlling the spread of the virus.

At a time when Trump is downplaying the rising cases in the vast majority of states, dangerously holding huge rallies with few masks and no social distancing, and lodging the false and outlandish claim that doctors are exaggerating the number of Covid deaths for profit, Fauci told the Post that the nation is “in for a whole lot of hurt.”

“All the stars are aligned in the wrong place” as the country heads indoors in colder weather, Fauci told the newspaper in an interview late Friday — a day when the US set a global record for the most daily cases and the nation surpassed 229,000 deaths. “You could not possibly be positioned more poorly.”

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Fauci, who is widely trusted by the public after a lengthy career serving under six presidents from both parties, said Meadows was being candid in the interview last weekend where he told Tapper it was not possible to control the virus. Fauci has adopted the polar opposite strategy by repeatedly telling Americans that they can change the trajectory of the virus and save lives if they adhere to mask use, social distancing protocols and other safety precautions.

“I tip my hat to him for admitting the strategy,” Fauci told the Post of Meadows’

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How one summer camp’s freewheeling approach led to 118 cases

Here’s what not to do at summer camp.



a person sitting at a table with a cake: Nursing assistant Monica Brodsky, left, and nurse Taylor Mathisen work at a drive-thru testing site for COVID-19 in the parking lot at UW Health Administrative Office Building in Middleton, Wis., Monday, Oct. 5, 2020. A surge of coronavirus cases in Wisconsin and the Dakotas is forcing a scramble for hospital beds and raising political tensions, as the Upper Midwest and Plains emerge as one of the nation's most troubling hotspots. (Amber Arnold/Wisconsin State Journal via AP)


© AMBER ARNOLD/AP
Nursing assistant Monica Brodsky, left, and nurse Taylor Mathisen work at a drive-thru testing site for COVID-19 in the parking lot at UW Health Administrative Office Building in Middleton, Wis., Monday, Oct. 5, 2020. A surge of coronavirus cases in Wisconsin and the Dakotas is forcing a scramble for hospital beds and raising political tensions, as the Upper Midwest and Plains emerge as one of the nation’s most troubling hotspots. (Amber Arnold/Wisconsin State Journal via AP)

A single Covid-19 positive camper set off a chain of infection that reached more than three-quarters of students, counselors and staffers at a faith-based retreat in Wisconsin over the summer, health officials reported Thursday.

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Camp organizers had tried to prevent just such a superspreading by requiring proof of immunity — an effort that failed completely, Wisconsin health officials reported in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s weekly health report, the MMWR.

The 152 high school-aged boys from 21 states and territories and foreign countries, counselors and staff were asked to produce negative Covid-19 tests or proof they had been infected and recovered; to self-quarantine at home for a week before traveling to the camp; and to wear masks while traveling.

Once there, the camp organizers seemed to feel free to let the boys loose.

“At the retreat, students and counselors were not required to wear masks or social distance, and students mixed freely. Classes were held in outdoor pavilions with approximately 20 students per class seated less than 6 feet apart at tables,” the team, led by Ian Pray of the Wisconsin Department of Health Services, wrote.

“Beds in dormitory rooms and yurts were tightly spaced with three to four sets of bunks each, shared bathrooms, and shared common areas.”

By the second week of the camp, 24 students were displaying symptoms, and two had tested positive for Covid-19. Still, camp staff did little to contain the spread.

“These students were given masks, but contact tracing was not done and the students were not isolated,” the researchers wrote.

After the second positive test result, the Wisconsin Department of Health Services stepped in. It was almost too late to stop the virus, however.

“At least one confirmed case occurred in every dormitory room and yurt,” the researchers wrote. In all, 118 people tested positive — 78% of campers and staff. This was likely an underestimate, the researchers said, because testing was done well after the outbreak started.

Only one of the four staff members got sick — they all had individual sleeping quarters.

Of interest, almost all the infected campers had symptoms, and those who had been infected before they came to camp showed no evidence of becoming infected a second time.

“This outbreak investigation documented rapid spread of SARS-CoV-2, likely from a single student, among adolescents and young adults in a congregate setting,” Pray’s team concluded.

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San Francisco’s go-slow approach toward reopening amid the pandemic is paying off

SAN FRANCISCO CA - OCT. 22, 2020. Musicians play at Golden Gate Park in San Francisco on Thursday, Aug. 22, 2020. San Francisco has done an excellent job following public health guidance and made a huge leap from the coronavirus orange tier to the less restrictive yellow tier, providing a pathway for more businesses and activities to reopen. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)
Musicians play at Golden Gate Park in San Francisco on Aug. 22. The city is moving to the least restrictive yellow tier under the state’s coronavirus reopening guidelines. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)

Much of San Francisco looked like a ghost town during late April. All but essential services were closed. Few roamed the streets. The mood seemed as grim as the gray skies overhead.

Now life has returned. Restaurants and stores are open. Clad in masks, pedestrians last week clutched bags from stores where they had just shopped. Diners sat at tables outside restaurants and cafes. People strolled along the bay on the Embarcadero, and a huge Ferris wheel opened for business at Golden Gate Park.

After cautiously approaching the pandemic for months, with a go-slow attitude toward reopening, San Francisco has become the first urban center in California to enter the least restrictive tier for reopening. Risk of infection, according to the state’s color-coded tiers, is considered minimal, even though San Francisco is the second-densest city in the country after New York.

“We have, at least so far, done everything right,” said Dr. Robert Wachter, professor and chair of the Department of Medicine at UC San Francisco.

City officials still are not declaring victory. Characteristically, they warn, the virus still lurks around the corner. And as they have before, they will follow local metrics rather than reopen just becomes the state allows it.

A salesperson wears a mask in City Lights Books in the North Beach area of San Francisco on Aug. 22.
A salesperson wears a mask in City Lights Books in the North Beach neighborhood of San Francisco. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)

Experts credit San Francisco’s success to a long partnership between public health officers and universities, most notably during the AIDS crisis. San Francisco is not monolithic, but its residents largely followed health guidelines. Unlike other counties, which may have dozens of mayors and city councils, San Francisco is also a city with only one mayor and a Board of Supervisors, and both have largely deferred to the judgment of health officials.

The tech industry, which has a prominent presence in San Francisco, played a role too. Companies ordered their employees to work from home two weeks before San Francisco and other Bay Area counties shut down, Wachter said. That not only kept more people off the streets but signaled to the rest of the region that industry giants were taking the threat of the coronavirus seriously.

San Francisco followed the “hammer and dance” approach, made famous by San Francisco author Tomas Pueyo on the website Medium, Wachter said. The city hit the hammer by shutting down early in the pandemic. The dance has been more complicated. The city has reopened slowly, making adjustments when cases rose and backtracking when necessary.

Of the 20 most populous cities in the U.S., San Francisco has the lowest death rate per capita from COVID-19. If the entire country had followed the city’s approach, Wachter said, there would be 50,000 dead from the pandemic instead of more than 220,000.

To be sure, San Francisco

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Homeopathy As Alternative Medicine – Holistic Approach to Treatment

Homeopathy is an alternative medicine system pioneered and developed by a German physician, Samuel Hahnemann, around the end of the 18th century. It is a science of acknowledging the wholeness of a person, not just the ailments or problems- but the mind, body, spirit, soul and psychology of a person affected when there is illness present. The science does not alienate the disease from the person; rather the focus is laid on the origin, progress, impacts, and effects of the sickness on the individual. Homeopathic medicines, or 'remedies' being very different from the allopathic or over the counter ones, stimulate the body's self-regulating mechanisms to initiate the healing process.

This philosophy believes that when a person is attacked by illness, it not only affects his physical body but the totality of him, ie the whole person is sick: body, mind, and spirit. The body manifests symptoms of illness but it is not the origin of the illness. The origin of illness usually lies in an imbalance of forces residing within an individual. The symptoms expressed by the body, mind, and spirit are the manifestation of that imbalance. When an appropriate homeopathic remedy is provided to match the symptoms of illness, the balance of the vital living forces is maintained. When the healing begins, the symptoms begin to disappear.

Homeopathy has been formed on the powerful and central blocks of principles that are its founding platform. These principles have proved their substance, sustaining for over 200 years, treating sickness of most kinds.

The first principle of homeopathy is likes cure likes – Homoeo means similar, and pathos means suffering, this is the code on which the theory was named on. It states that a substance that can create an illness in a healthy person can be used to obtain a healing response in someone presenting with a similar disease. Every person shows symptoms of the illness in the form of changes in the body / mind / spirit. Some of these symptoms are common to that particular illness, others maybe the attributes of that person. A homeopathic practitioner would match the symptoms of the remedy to the symptoms of the person, with special focus to those symptoms which are unique to the individual.

The second principle of homeopathy is The Single Remedy – According to this only one homeopathic remedy should be given at one time. It saves one from accounting for the working of several medicines at one time. Not just that, it also allows one to ascertain the complete effect of the given medicine. It safeguards from the unpredictability and ambiguity of practices and remedies of alternative medicine.

The third principle of homeopathy is the Minimum Dosage – The principle that only 'the minimum dose' should be employed is based upon the understanding that the Minimum single dose stimulus of the medicine triggers the intrinsic healing response. Following this principle, we give only enough medicine to initiate this healing response. This response then carries on, driven by the body's …

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