Disc Medicine to Present at the Virtual 62nd American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting

CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Dec. 2, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Disc Medicine, a biotechnology company dedicated to the discovery and development of novel therapeutic candidates for serious and debilitating hematologic diseases, today announced that preclinical data from two pipeline programs that modulate the hepcidin pathway will be presented at the 62nd American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting & Exposition, which will be held virtually December 5-8, 2020.

Details of the presentations are as follows:

Abstract Number: 1690
Title: DISC-a, the First in a Novel Class of Potent and Selective Matriptase-2 Inhibitors for the Treatment of Hematologic Disorders Characterized By Low Hepcidin
Date: Sunday, December 6, 2020, 7:00 AM-3:30 PM EST
Session: 102. Regulation of Iron Metabolism: Poster II
Presenter: Vu Hong, PhD, Director and Project Leader

Abstract Number: 2599
Title: DISC-0974, a Novel, First-in-Class, Anti-Hemojuvelin Monoclonal Antibody Decreases Hepcidin and Increases Transferrin Saturation in a Non-Human Primate Model of Cytokine (IL-6) Induced Hypoferremia
Date: Monday, December 7, 2020, 7:00 AM-3:30 PM EST
Session: 102. Regulation of Iron Metabolism: Poster III
Presenter: Maria Beconi, PhD, SVP of Translational Research and Development

Full abstracts are currently available through the ASH conference website: www.hematology.org/Annual-Meeting/Abstracts/.

About Disc Medicine
Disc Medicine is a hematology company harnessing new insights in hepcidin biology to address ineffective red blood cell production (erythropoiesis) in hematologic diseases. Currently focused on the hepcidin pathway, the master regulator of iron metabolism, Disc is developing a portfolio of first-in-class therapeutic candidates to transform the treatment of hematologic diseases. For more information, visit www.discmedicine.com.

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7 Native American Inventions That Revolutionized Medicine And Public Health

November is National American Indian Heritage Month, a time of recognition for the substantial contributions the first Americans made to the establishment and growth of the U.S. But, the month and remembrance, like many Native influences, still frequently go unrecognized in our day-to-day lives. Whether it’s the invention of vital infrastructure such as cable suspension bridges or sport for fun like lacrosse, so much of what exists in modern culture today is a direct result of what was created before newcomers occupied these lands.

And the world’s health ecosystem, ranging from preventative measures to administration of medicine is no different, owing much of its practices and innovations to those ancestral peoples and healers.

Here are seven inventions used every day in medicine and public health that we owe to Native Americans. And in most cases, couldn’t live without today:

1. Syringes

In 1853 a Scottish doctor named Alexander Wood was credited for the creation of the first hypodermic syringe, but a much earlier tool existed. Before colonization, Indigenous peoples had created a method using a sharpened hollowed-out bird bone connected to an animal bladder that could hold and inject fluids into the body. These earliest syringes were used to do everything from inject medicine to irrigate wounds. There are also cases in which these tools were even used to clean ears and serve as enemas.     

2. Pain Relievers

Native American healers led the way in pain relief. For example, willow bark (the bark of a tree) is widely known to have been ingested as an anti-inflammatory and pain reliever. In fact, it contains a chemical called salicin, which is a confirmed anti-inflammatory that when consumed generates salicylic acid – the active ingredient in modern-day aspirin tablets. In addition to many ingestible pain relievers, topical ointments were also frequently used for wounds, cuts and bruises. Two well-documented pain relievers include capsaicin (a chemical still referenced today that is derived from peppers) and jimson weed as a topical analgesic.

3. Oral Birth Control

Oral birth control was introduced to the United States in the 1960’s as a means of preventing pregnancy. But something with a similar purpose existed in indigenous cultures long before. Plant-based practices such as ingesting herbs dogbane and stoneseed were used for at least two centuries earlier than western pharmaceuticals to prevent unwanted pregnancy. And while they are not as effective as current oral contraception, there are studies suggesting stoneseed in particular has contraceptive properties.

4. Sun Screen

North American Indians have medicinal purposes for more than 2,500 plant species – and that is just what’s currently known between existing practices. But, for hundreds of years many Native cultures had a common skin application that involved mixing ground plants with water to create products that protected skin from the sun. Sunflower oil, wallflower and sap from

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Producer Franco Porporino (‘American Chopper’) Launches COVID Certification Program For Non-Scripted TV

American Chopper executive producer Franco Porporino (coordinating producer, Regular Heroes) is starting a business called COVID Film Certification to educate production crews and talent on set as Hollywood resumes production.

He’s calling it a one-stop shop for non-scripted television, the area he knowns best. It offers – alone or in combination — industry-specific safety exams for production personnel, crew and talent on CDC guidelines and other best practices on set; compliance officer training; EPA approved PPE; consulting services by experienced showrunners to create customized budgets; and nurses who can also be trained as compliance officers.

“Many producers are facing significant hurdles in light of all the complications and challenges posed by COVID-19. Production companies need to get back to work but must do so in a way that prioritizes health and safety for all personnel,” Porporino said.

He started to explore the idea after hearing colleagues complain about expensive consultancies and inexperienced compliance people that were ripping productions off and possibly putting them in danger.

The COVID Film Certification program features training modules that include online exams covering industry specific COVID-19 protocols and best practices for all pre-production and post-production personnel. They get a certificate valid for a year if they pass, although Porporino said the company is not aligned with any official organization.

“I am hearing production companies are getting price gouged. People are selling them [costly] PPE and consulting fees. Or one colleague said they sent her a compliance officer who was her former PA. I heard from multiple people in the business that they are getting … people who are going on set playing with their phones,” said Porporino.

He worked closely on the concept with a friend Lori Rothschild Ansaldi, producer and CEO of Big City TV, who is on his advisory board.

“Big City TV, along with my partners at the Content Group, were not satisfied with simply ‘meeting protocols’ for our shows,” Ansaldi said. “Our goal is to always go above and beyond for our clients and talent to ensure that we create and maintain safe and healthy work environments.” She’ll be using the tests for crew and talent across Big City’s portfolio of projects.

Each exam costs $99. Porporino said he’s currently contracted with three productions that he can’t name because they haven’t been announced yet.

The program has partnered with a VIPrivate Care, a healthcare company based in New York, to provide medical personnel and testing and with another company for PPE.

The advisory board also includes Ra Kumar of United Talent Agency, Lucilla D’Agostino of Big Fish Entertainment, Hans Schiff, formerly a partner at Creative Arts Agency, Darin Frank, a partner in the entertainment law firm of Sloane, Offer, Weber and Dern, and NYU Professor Peter Rajsingh.

Porporino it so happens also owns Fresco Da Franco, an Italian restaurant in Montclair, New Jersey, which was a whole other headache with COVID. Trying to reopen there gave him some ideas.

COVID Film Certification is 72.5% funded by Porporino and 27.5% by

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American Brain Tumor Association Awards 11 Research Grants to Advance Brain Tumor Research

American Brain Tumor Association Awards 11 Research Grants to Advance Brain Tumor Research

PR Newswire

CHICAGO, Oct. 30, 2020

CHICAGO, Oct. 30, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — As the nation’s first nonprofit organization committed to funding brain tumor research and providing education and information across all tumor types, the American Brain Tumor Association (ABTA) persists in its mission, announcing today the investment of $368,000 towards 11 new research grants to foster innovation in diagnosis and treatment of brain tumors in adults and children.

American Brain Tumor Association
American Brain Tumor Association

The ABTA’s grant program plays an integral role in advancing the understanding and treatment of brain tumors. Dedicated to investing in early-stage investigators who have unique perspectives to drive the future of brain tumor science and treatment, the ABTA provides research grants to medical students, post-doctoral fellows, and early-career faculty. This investment is even more critical with the COVID-19 pandemic shifting research priorities and impacting government funding for brain tumor research.

“We are excited to continue our legacy of supporting innovative research and early-career researchers, especially during this challenging time. With almost $33 million invested to date, the ABTA is committed to funding the research that will one day lead to cures,” said Nicole Willmarth, Ph.D., chief mission officer, ABTA.

With the Southeastern Brain Tumor Foundation (SBTF) investing more than $100,000 to support three research projects, the ongoing partnership between the ABTA and SBTF exemplifies the strengths of the ABTA’s rigorous grant selection process and accelerates the research investments of both organizations.

“The vast potential of the new projects we fund and the incredible efforts by the researchers, renews my optimism that better treatments are on the horizon. Our collaborations with organizations, like SBTF, amplify our ability to achieve our common goal of improving outcomes for brain tumor patients,” said Nicole Willmarth.

This year’s slate of research investigates critical areas in neuro-oncology research including experimental therapeutics, the role of the immune system and immunotherapies, as well as factors that modify gene function in brain tumor cells.

The ABTA congratulates the 2020 grant recipients listed below. To learn more about the grant recipients and their research projects, visit https://www.abta.org/research/research-funding-impact/.

Basic Research Fellowships are two-year, $100,000 grants awarded to post-doctoral fellows who are mentored by established and nationally-recognized experts in the neuro-oncology field.

  • Emily Darrow, Ph.D., St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

  • Tyler Miller, M.D., Ph.D., Massachusetts General Hospital

Discovery Grants are one-year, $50,000 grants supporting cutting-edge, innovative approaches that have the potential to change current diagnostic or treatment standards of care for either adult or pediatric brain tumors.

  • Munjal Acharya, Ph.D., University of California, Irvine

  • Lan Hoang-Minh, Ph.D., University of Florida

  • Gary Kohanbash, Ph.D., Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh

Medical Student Summer Fellowships are $3,000 grants awarded to medical students to conduct brain tumor research projects under the guidance of neuro-oncology experts. Through these grants, the ABTA seeks to encourage physician-scientists to enter and remain in the brain tumor field.

  • Hasan Alrefai, B.S., University of Alabama at

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American College of Emergency Physicians Elects Dr. Mark Rosenberg as President

WASHINGTON, Oct. 25, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) is pleased to announce that Mark Rosenberg, DO, MBA, FACEP, has been elected president during its annual meeting, ACEP20, the world’s largest emergency medicine conference.

Mark Rosenberg, DO, MBA, FACEP, president, American College of Emergency Physicians
Mark Rosenberg, DO, MBA, FACEP, president, American College of Emergency Physicians

Through his leadership role Dr. Rosenberg will focus on pandemic readiness—including the ongoing battle against COVID-19—improving health equity, and the expansion of telehealth. Reflecting on his upcoming presidency and the future direction of the college, Dr. Rosenberg said:

“Our lives are forever changed by the COVID-19 pandemic, as a country and medical specialty. The fight against this virus has revealed the commitment and courage of emergency physicians like few other events in our lifetime. The nation has witnessed what ACEP members have known all along: emergency physicians provide incredible value to our patients and health care system.

Now, under my leadership, we will create a stronger framework for the future that focuses on improving patient access to care and empowers and protects emergency physicians’ ability to do their job.

The pandemic also adds urgency to efforts to eliminate health disparities and improve health equity in this country. Many people rely on emergency physicians because we are the best or only option for care. We are often first to confront the consequences of gaps in care and barriers to access, so it is imperative that we seize the opportunity to factor prominently into the solutions. Emergency physicians must make sure that patients of all backgrounds have more opportunities to access treatment they need.

Further, it is time to use telehealth to extend the footprint of emergency medicine beyond hospital walls. Emergency physicians are finding new ways to deliver appropriate medical attention to patients when, and where, it is necessary. We must encourage a favorable regulatory environment that welcomes more comprehensive and better-connected care.

ACEP members are leading efforts to fight the opioid epidemic, improve mental health care, and enhance the way we treat our older and most vulnerable patients, among many other initiatives to confront the nation’s most pressing health care challenges. It is the honor of a lifetime to lead ACEP as we forge the future of our specialty and build on the remarkable value of emergency medicine to make a difference in millions of patients’ lives.”  

During his one-year tenure as ACEP president, Dr. Rosenberg will move from chair to chair emeritus of emergency medicine at St. Joseph’s Health in Paterson and Wayne, New Jersey, where he is known as the innovator behind the nation’s first Alternative to Opioids (ALTO) program.

Dr. Rosenberg was first elected to the ACEP board of directors in 2015 and has served on the board of directors of the Emergency Medicine Foundation, and on the National Pain Management Task Force of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. In addition to ALTO, Dr. Rosenberg has long been a champion for advances in palliative and geriatric care, including the ACEP

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660 crosses going up at an American Legion post near Howell

HOWELL, Mich. (AP) — When U.S. Army veteran Jon Luker returned from serving in the Panama Canal Zone during the Vietnam War era he struggled with his mental health.

“I was just walking around confused and not motivated to get involved in anything, but I didn’t understand the source of my confusion, why I was tired all the time and why I couldn’t get sleep,” Luker told the Livingston Daily.

Luker, 69, said his own experience overcoming an existential crisis inspired him to take over coordinating a veterans suicide awareness project originally founded by the Veterans Refuge Network.


Hundreds of crosses have already been installed outside the American Legion post in Howell Township to bring awareness to veteran suicide.

Everyday this month at 10 a.m., veterans, groups and individuals visit the American Legion Devereaux Post 141 to place more crosses and sometimes share personal stories.

Each day 22 new crosses are installed. The number is based on a 2013 U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs study that estimates about 22 veterans committed suicide each day between 1999 and 2010.

A 2019 report from the VA estimates the average number of veteran suicide deaths per day equaled or exceeded 16 between 2005 and 2017.

Luker said it is difficult to know the real number of veterans who die from suicide each day. He said he suspects the deaths are under reported.

By the end of this month, there will be 660 crosses outside the American Legion, signifying 22 suicides a day for 30 days.

Luker said there are several reasons some veterans do not receive help, including stigma surrounding mental health.

“It’s a little hard on your ego to consider yourself as someone who cannot function, especially when you’ve been in the military and you are supposed to be able to do anything,” he said. He added that some veterans are afraid of losing jobs that require them to maintain security clearances.

“The VA is underfunded. … I think many veterans think, if I get this service, then someone else won’t who needs it more,” he said.

He also said he thinks the VA’s mental health services are subpar.

Brighton businessman John Conely said his uncle Bud Conely took his own life at the age of 40, around the time John was born in 1962. John and his aunt, Evelyn Conely-Montgomery, Bud’s sister, dedicated one of the crosses to him by writing his name on it.

“He was a POW from the Battle of the Bulge,” during WWII, John Conely said. Bud Conely returned to the U.S. weighing about 95 pounds. “He recovered and stayed in the army, working as a Nazi POW guard in Michigan and Ohio. He was quite a hero.”

“It’s closer to home than we know,” Conely said. “We as citizens are responsible for taking care of veterans and knowing what we can do to help them.”

Bobby Bright, the American Legion post’s finance officer who served in Iraq, said the problem is widespread.

“Everybody knows someone,” Bright

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Resurgent Virus Rages Across the American Heartland


New reported cases by day in the United States

March

April

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

New cases

7-day average

Source: New York Times database of reports from state and local health agencies

See maps and charts showing Covid-19 cases around the country »

The latest coronavirus surge is raging across the American heartland, most acutely in the Midwest and Mountain West.

This harrowing third surge, which led to a U.S. single-day record of more than 85,000 new cases Friday, is happening less than two weeks from Election Day, which will mark the end of a campaign dominated by the pandemic and President Trump’s much-criticized response to it.

As of Friday evening, 15 states have added more cases in the past week than in any other seven-day stretch of the pandemic: Wisconsin, a battleground in the presidential election, Colorado, Kentucky, Illinois, Wyoming, Idaho, Utah, South Dakota, Montana, Arkansas, Alaska, Tennessee, Ohio, Indiana and North Dakota. And four states have added more deaths this week than in previous weeks: Wisconsin, Kentucky, South Dakota and Oklahoma.

North Dakota leads the nation in coronavirus cases per capita. Illinois is averaging more than 4,100 new cases per day, up 85 percent from the average two weeks ago. And Pennsylvania, another battleground state, on Friday reported a record of 2,258 cases.

The virus will be front of mind for voters in several key states: in Ohio, where more people are hospitalized than at any other time during the pandemic, and especially Wisconsin, home to seven of the country’s 10 metro areas with the highest numbers of recent cases. On Friday, the Wisconsin Supreme Court blocked Gov. Tony Evers’ emergency order restricting the size of indoor gatherings to 25 percent capacity on Friday.

Experts worry that the growing numbers in need of hospital care will only get worse if cases continue to mount, especially in rural areas where medical facilities could be quickly overwhelmed.

Credit…Hannah Mckay/Reuters

Citing a rise in hospitalizations across the state, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment announced a strengthening of coronavirus restrictions in certain counties, capping gatherings at 10 people from no more than two separate households. For the third straight day, Colorado announced a new single-day cases record on Friday.

Overnight, nearly 2,500 people were hospitalized in Illinois, the state’s top public health official, Dr. Ngozi Ezike, said in a news conference Friday afternoon. The mayor of Chicago, Lori E. Lightfoot, announced a curfew on nonessential businesses beginning at 10 p.m. on Friday.

In the latest presidential debate on Thursday night, President Trump asserted that the virus was “going away” as he defended his management of the pandemic. Former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., the Democratic nominee, attacked Mr. Trump’s handling, calling for much more aggressive federal action for the “dark winter” ahead.

President Trump and many supporters blame restrictions on business activity, often

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Program Nationally Recognized for Bringing American Indian Students to Careers in Science and Medicine

Media Contacts

Julie Kiefer

Associate Director, Science Communications, University of Utah Health
Email: [email protected]
Phone: 801-587-1293

Oct 21, 2020 10:00 PM

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NARI 2019

A University of Utah Health Department of Pediatrics program that supports academic, career, and personal development of American Indian / Alaska Native (AI/AN) undergraduates from across the country has received recognition from the National Indian Health Board. The National Impact Award honors individuals and organizations whose work has made an impact on AI/AN health care on a national level. The Native American Research Internship (NARI) program was one of six recipients to receive the prestigious honor this year.

This award elevates the visibility of American Indian health care issues in the state of Utah and across the country,” says Scott Willie, NARI alumni and program coordinator. “NARI represents a small piece in the circle that has significantly increased the awareness of the need for more AI/AN researchers and health care providers. This award signifies the hope and prayers that our ancestors had for the future health and wellness of our communities.

Launched in 2010, NARI was built on the guiding principal that eliminating health disparities hinges on recruitment, education, and training of the most talented scientists in the US. The program accomplishes this goal by providing hands-on research experience with University of Utah faculty and intensive mentoring to American Indian students who are interested in health science careers. The National Institutes of Health-funded program brings students to the U from around the country for 10 weeks each summer.

““The fires ignited here can bring light to our tribes for generations.”

Unique to the program is the mentoring support provided to students as many navigate the world of biomedical research for the first time. Students meet with academic mentors about research in addition to mentors from the larger regional AI/AN community, who help them integrate their identity inside and outside of the research environment. In weekly talking circles, interns learn from one another as they discuss challenges and shared experiences. NARI students credit the personalized approach for making all the difference.

“…Even more important than the networking this program has provided is the great job it has done in fostering and strengthening our self-identity as future physicians,” one participant said in a survey. “The fires ignited here can bring light to our tribes for generation.

alt="
Gloria Slattum, PhD, Maija Holsti, MD, Scott Willie

In its ten years, NARI has been a resounding success, with 128 participants representing 46 different tribal nations and 57 colleges and universities completing the internship. Of those, none have dropped out of college; so far, 53% have gone on to either medical or graduate school and 28% are employed in biomedical research. In addition, all students surveyed last year reported improvements in research skills, oral and written presentations, and knowledge of health disparities within AI/AN communities.

“I am most proud of the resilience, perseverance, and wonderful accomplishments of our NARI students,” says Maija Holsti, M.D., NARI director. “The NARI program hopes to continue to

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National Study Reveals The Current Fitness Habits Of The American Gymgoer

BOSTON, Oct. 20, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The International Health, Racquet & Sportsclub Association (IHRSA) released first-of-its kind data from a new national survey* of Americans with gym memberships that addresses their physical and mental state throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. The full results from the study, which was conducted in collaboration with leading international insights company Kelton Global, a Material Company, are published in “The COVID Era Fitness Consumer” IHRSA report and delve into how Americans feel about the pandemic overall, what effects it has had on their overall health and fitness, how the virus has shaped their personal wellness outlooks, their overall comfort levels returning to the gym and more.

As gyms closed due to COVID-19 in March, members were forced to change up their routines. While some got creative with at-home workouts, others struggled to find a comparable fitness solution. The study overwhelmingly found that gymgoers look forward to returning to their gym — and at least one aspect of physically being in their gym (95 percent), plus the routines and sense of community they associate with it — as they push to reach their personal fitness goals. In fact, when asked what they missed most, the only thing Americans miss more than going to the gym (59 percent) is visiting their loved ones (65 percent) – more so than going to concerts or games (55 percent), bars or restaurants (51 percent) or even seeing movies in theaters (46 percent).

Not only do gym members feel positively about returning to the gym — many feel ready and motivated to do so – they look forward to enjoying the physical and mental benefits of working out at their gym again, from building strength and their immune system to releasing mood-boosting endorphins. Notably, exactly half (50 percent) of gym members express dissatisfaction with at-home fitness efforts and changes

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Dr. Augusto Sola, Masimo VP of Medical Affairs for Neonatology, Honored by the American Academy of Pediatrics with Pioneer Award

Dr. Sola Pioneered New Protocol Using Masimo SET® Pulse Oximetry That Dramatically Reduced Blindness and Eye Damage in Neonates

Masimo (NASDAQ: MASI) announced today that Augusto Sola, MD, Vice President of Medical Affairs for Neonatology at Masimo, has been awarded the 2020 Pioneer Award, Section of Neonatal Perinatal Medicine, by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). The honor recognizes the groundbreaking achievements and contributions Dr. Sola has made, using his Masimo SET®-based protocol, to improve the health and well-being of newborn infants.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201019005215/en/

Dr. Augusto Sola (Photo: Business Wire)

Dr. Sola’s impressive career in neonatology has improved the lives of countless newborns in the U.S., Latin America, and across the world. Dr. Sola’s innovative research on oxygen administration and monitoring oxygen saturation in preterm infants has played a key role in reducing the rate of neonatal blindness (retinopathy of prematurity) and our understanding of the impact of various neonatal practices on the developing brain. Dr. Sola has published 130 original articles in peer-reviewed journals, 390 review articles, and 5 neonatology textbooks, as well as delivered more than 3,500 lectures to research and clinical groups around the world. Dr. Sola also founded the Ibero-American Society of Neonatology (SIBEN), dedicated to continuous quality improvement in neonatal care throughout the Americas.

Dr. Sola received his MD at Buenos Aires University School of Medicine and completed his Pediatric Residency and Chief Pediatric Residency at the University of Massachusetts, followed by a Neonatal Fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco. In neonatal practice since 1974, Dr. Sola has been Professor of Pediatrics at Buenos Aires University Medical School, the University of California, San Francisco, the University of California, Los Angeles, and Emory University. In addition to his position at Masimo, Dr. Sola continues to work directly with critically ill newborns.

Dr. Sola’s seminal work was done in 1998 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. The results, published in 2003 by Drs. Sola, Wright, and Chow, showed that using a new protocol with Masimo SET®, clinicians reduced ROP to nearly zero over five years.1 Dr. Sola and colleagues later showed at Emory that the protocol’s success depended on SET® technology, as the same protocol with a competing pulse oximeter did not reduce ROP.2 Dr. Sola’s work on the reduction of ROP through oxygen saturation targeting has now become the standard of care.3-5

Dr. Sergio Golombek, MD, MPH, Professor of Pediatrics at New York Medical College, Neonatologist, Ex-President of SIBEN, and AAP member, commented, “In 1952, a Chicago newspaper wrote: ‘The best friend a baby ever had,’ referring to pediatrician Isaac A. Abt, MD, FAAP (1867-1955), founder of the AAP and its first president in 1930. He was known as a leading clinician, academic, advocate, promoter, writer, and leader. I think this has been overcome by Dr. Sola, who is, in my opinion, the best friend of a baby and his or her parents

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