Parents in so-called ‘mom code’ allegedly refuse to get kids tested for COVID-19 to help keep schools open

The so-called “mom code” is allegedly being shared by some parents in Utah.

Health officials are sounding the alarm about a group of parents in Utah who are allegedly pledging to not have their children tested for COVID-19 in order to make infection numbers artificially appear lower.

The alleged push to avoid getting kids tested, dubbed the “mom code,” is seen in messages shared on Facebook urging parents to keep their child at home if they show COVID-19 symptoms, but to not get tested.

The messages are reportedly being shared among parents in Utah’s Davis School District, which oversees more than 73,000 students in Davis County, Utah.

“If there is a quarantine with a sports team or with any of the classrooms, they are encouraging each other not to have their children tested,” said Genevra Prothero, a parent in the school district, who fears community spread if the “mom code” is encouraged. “This is a time where we need to really focus on tracing the virus so we can be able to stop the spread.”

State health officials say it’s unknown how many parents are actually taking part in the alleged “mom code,” but warn that those who do could be contributing to the spread of COVID-19.

PHOTO: Facebook screenshots allegedly show parents discouraging testing for COVID-19.

Facebook screenshots allegedly show parents discouraging testing for COVID-19.

“Testing is a critical element of our response,” health officials told “Good Morning America” in a statement, in part. “Identifying cases …is a key strategy to limiting the spread of disease in our communities.”

Davis County currently has more than 8,000 reported cases of COVID-19. The state of Utah has more than 104,000 cases of COVID-19, according to state health data.

The United States is the worst-affected country, with more than 8.6 million diagnosed cases of COVID-19 and at least 225,230 deaths.

Emilie Daly, a mother of four young children, is running for the school board in Davis County. She told “GMA” that while she is not participating in the reported “mom code,” she can understand why some parents would.

“It’s not mandated to get tested, that’s the thing,” she said. “And so we need to remember that it is a choice and you need to make decisions based off of what you feel.”

The Davis School District did not reply to ABC News’ request for comment. ABC News also reached out to some of the parents allegedly involved in the so-called “mom code” and they also did not reply.

Students in the district are currently attending school on a varied, hybrid model of in-person and remote learning, according to the school district’s website.

The school district’s Board of Education last week released its quarantine protocols for students and staff, noting that in the case of a school outbreak, the classroom or school would enter a “14-day quarantine with students moving to remote learning.”

“The longer

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Newborn Loses Several Organs After North Carolina Hospital Allegedly Inserts Feeding Tube Incorrectly

A mother has filed a lawsuit against a North Carolina hospital for allegedly making a mistake following her newborn baby’s heart surgery, which has left him “fighting for his life.”

Messiah was born with a heart condition in November last year. A few days after his birth, the boy underwent a surgery at the Atrium Health Carolinas Medical Center.

Following the surgery, the child had trouble taking the feeding bottle, and when the mother, Shytilya Springs, informed the hospital, they decided to insert a feeding tube. 

However, the boy’s condition got worse after it was discovered the tube had pierced his intestines and all the nutrition they had supplied to the child through the tube had leaked. This caused the boy to lose several organs.

The mother told WSOC-TV that the boy is “still fighting for his life” and said the hospital is at fault.

Springs has now filed a lawsuit against the hospital and the medical staff. She is suing them because she would need nearly $20 million to look after her son for the rest of his life. Springs also said that as of now, the boy can’t taste food or eat.

“Once you put all the food into his abdomen, you either increase the pressure which compromised blood flow or the chemical reaction between the food products and his intestines caused the tissue breakdown. So, his stomach and intestines became necrotic. Essentially, they died. It became necessary to remove them to save his life,” attorney Charles Monnett said in the lawsuit, the television station reported.

The hospital is yet to comment on the lawsuit. However, they did appear in court and denied all the allegations.

Meanwhile, the Duke University Hospital is trying to determine if the boy could undergo an intestinal transplant. It wasn’t clear if the mother approached the hospital.

“I want him to be better,” Springs told the television station. 

Baby Feet This is a representational image of a baby’s feet. Photo: Pixabay

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