Michigan Medicine restricts visitors for adult patients as COVID-19 cases climb

ANN ARBOR – Michigan Medicine has updated its visitor policy with tightened restrictions in order to keep patients and staff safe as COVID-19 cases surge around the state.

As of Wednesday, no visitors will be permitted with adult patients in the health system’s hospitals, unless medically necessary.

Exceptions to the new restrictions include end-of-life care, labor and delivery and other scenarios which are listed here.

According to Michigan Medicine, the new policy change includes restrictions already announced:

  • No visitors are allowed with adult emergency department patients, except when medically necessary.
  • At C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital, two visitors are allowed for pediatric patients. But family and other visitors are required to wear a mask (covering their mouth and nose) at all Michigan Medicine properties. This includes in a patient room and throughout the facility. Patients who can tolerate a mask must wear one when a health care worker is present in their room.
  • In clinics, no visitors will be allowed for adult patients unless the patient has a cognitive or physical impairment that requires assistance. One primary caregiver is allowed to accompany each pediatric patient to an appointment, unless an additional aide or assistant is required.

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“COVID-19 transmission rates continue to climb in the community,” Laraine Washer, Michigan Medicine’s medical director of infection prevention and epidemiology said in a statement. “Our top priority is the safety of our patients and staff, and to minimize the spread of disease, we need to take this additional step.

“We know this is difficult for our patients and their families and friends. But we need to continue to keep our Michigan Medicine facilities safe for all of our patients.”

Since the pandemic began in March, Michigan Medicine has been taking steps to keep staff and patients safe, including screening patients for symptoms, cleaning and disinfecting facilities, moving furniture to observe social distancing and following the latest guidelines to minimize infections.

“Limiting the risk of transmission of infection has always been a critical priority at Michigan Medicine,” Washer said in a statement. “And I want to reassure the public that if you need health care for a new problem or for continuing care of a chronic problem, you should not put it off.

“We have teams dedicated to keeping our patients and staff safe in our buildings. It is important to not delay emergency or chronic care.”

Washer urged people to avoid Thanksgiving gatherings this year with those outside your household.

“The best advice to limit risk is to continue to avoid gathering with people outside your household even if it is Thanksgiving,” she said in a statement. “If you are reporting to work, don’t have potlucks or share meals in close proximity with your co-workers: you can’t eat without taking off your mask, and that brief period of not wearing a mask could be enough to open the door to disease spread.

“We need everyone’s help with this. A large surge of

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Your Teachers May Have Been Key to Your Adult Mental Health | Health News

By Cara Murez, HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

MONDAY, Nov. 2, 2020 (Health Day News) — Great teachers can make a big difference in their students’ long-term health, research shows.

Teenagers who had good, supportive relationships with their teachers became healthier adults, according to a new report.

“This research suggests that improving students’ relationships with teachers could have important, positive and long-lasting effects beyond just academic success,” said study author Jinho Kim. He is an assistant professor of health policy and management at Korea University in Seoul.

“It could also have important health implications in the long run,” Kim said in a news release from the American Psychological Association.

For the study, Kim analyzed data from nearly 20,000 participants in a U.S. health study, including 3,400 pairs of siblings. That study followed participants from seventh grade into early adulthood. The teens answered a variety of questions about whether they had experienced trouble getting along with other students or teachers, and whether their friends or teachers cared about them.

In adulthood, the participants were asked about physical and mental health. The study recorded measures of physical health, including blood pressure and body mass index, an estimate of body fat based on height and weight.

The analysis found that participants who had better relationships with teachers and peers also had better physical and mental health in their mid-20s. When Kim looked at pairs of siblings (as a way to control for family background), only the link between student-teacher relationships and adult health remained significant.

Past research had suggested that teens’ peer relationships could be connected to adult health outcomes, possibly because poor relationships can lead to chronic stress, which raises the risk of future health problems, Kim said. It might be that other factors, including different family backgrounds, contributed both to relationship problems in teens and to poor health in adulthood.

Kim recommended that schools invest in training teachers on how to build warm, supportive relationships with students.

“This is not something that most teachers receive much training in,” he said, “but it should be.”

The findings were published online Oct. 29 in the journal School Psychology.

SOURCE: American Psychological Association, news release, Oct. 29, 2020

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